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Contemporary Security Management Chapter 10 Managing Guard Operations PowerPoint Presentation
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Contemporary Security Management Chapter 10 Managing Guard Operations

Contemporary Security Management Chapter 10 Managing Guard Operations

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Contemporary Security Management Chapter 10 Managing Guard Operations

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  1. Contemporary Security Management Chapter 10 Managing Guard Operations Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  2. Selection Process • Ohio Security Guard Requirements • Ohio mandates that all security guards be registered but not licensed with the state. However the company that employs the security guard must be licensed with the state. • Typically companies do mandate the security guards applying for employment meet the following criteria. • Applicant must be at least 18 years of age • High School Diploma or G.E.D. • No diagnosed mental illness • No felonies or criminal convections • Pass a drug screening test • US citizen or registered resident alien • Armed Security Guards may require firearm training Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  3. Training in Ohio • If you want to work as a security guard or private investigator in the State of Ohio, you must be licensed by the Ohio Department of Public Safety's Homeland Security division. • You must send in an application to the Homeland Security Division, along with an additional application and proof of firearms training if you are planning to carry a weapon on the job. • No mandatory training other than weapons training. Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  4. Training 142 • Every state has their own training requirements. • Some have mandatory training while others have very limited training or none at all. • In some states, where training is mandated, employers are allowed to defer training for a set period of time. Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  5. Training 143 • Training can be administered in three ways: • Classroom is the most expensive • OJT (On-the-job) reinforces classroom instruction • Online is relatively new and can be very cost effective as well as time effective Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  6. Needs Assessment aka Risk Assessment 144 • A needs assessment will answer three important questions: • What assets need to be protected? • What knowledge and skills will security officers need to posses in order to provide effective protection of the assets requiring protection? • What physical safeguards are needed to complement guard operations. Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  7. Assets 144 • Protection of assets is based on three factors: • The importance of the asset to the business. • The dollar value of the asset. • Replacement of the asset should it be stolen, damage, or destroyed. • “Critical assets” are those that meet all three of the above criteria. • If removed from the operation of a business, a single critical asset could have a catastrophic effect, even kill the business. Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  8. CSO’s Priority Task List • Three step process: • Form a priority list after a needs assessment has been concluded. • Determine if the guard force, physical safeguards, and written instructions are adequate. • Eliminate vulnerabilities exposed by the needs assessment. Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  9. Some TerminologyThreat, Vulnerability, Risk • Asset – People, property, and information.  People may include employees and customers along with other invited persons such as contractors or guests.  Property assets consist of both tangible and intangible items that can be assigned a value.  Intangible assets include reputation and proprietary information.  Information may include databases, software code, critical company records, and many other intangible items. • An asset is what we’re trying to protect. Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  10. Some TerminologyThreat, Vulnerability, Risk • Threat – Anything that can exploit a vulnerability, intentionally or accidentally, and obtain, damage, or destroy an asset. • A threat is what we’re trying to protect against. • Vulnerability – Weaknesses or gaps in a security program that can be exploited by threats to gain unauthorized access to an asset. • A vulnerability is a weakness or gap in our protection efforts. Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  11. Some TerminologyThreat, Vulnerability, Risk • Risk – The potential for loss, damage or destruction of an asset as a result of a threat exploiting a vulnerability. • Risk is the intersection of assets, threats, and vulnerabilities. • A + T + V = R • That is, Asset + Threat + Vulnerability = Risk. Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  12. Some TerminologyThreat, Vulnerability, Risk • Risk is a function of threats exploiting vulnerabilities to obtain, damage or destroy assets. Thus, threats (actual, conceptual, or inherent) may exist, but if there are no vulnerabilities then there is little/no risk. Similarly, you can have a vulnerability, but if you have no threat, then you have little/no risk. • Accurately assessing threats and identifying vulnerabilities is critical to understanding the risk to assets.  Understanding the difference between threats, vulnerabilities, and risk is the first step. Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  13. Proprietary versus Contract Security 146 • Proprietary security: in house • Contractual security: rent-a-cop • Proprietary: • Recruiting, selecting, and hiring are handled in-house. • Loyal • Contractual: • Quality performance delivered consistently. • Prompt responsiveness to concerns expressed by the customer. • A completive payroll rate. Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  14. Bid Solicitation 148 • The bid solicitation defines specifications and determines the pay rate of security officers. • Rule of thumb: • An officer should receive about 65% of the rate paid to the contract firm. The other 35% represents fringe benefits, the contract firm’s operating costs, and profit. Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  15. Service Level Agreements • Service Level Agreements (SLA) • SLAs define terms susceptible to • interpretation • clearly spell out the scope and nature of work to be performed • the skills required of people assigned to the work • the methods for assessing the quality of output • specifies steps to be followed if either party believes the terms of the SLA have not been met Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations

  16. Liability 155 • Respondeat superior aka vicarious liability • An old legal maxim meaning “let the master answer.” • Under this concept an employer is liable in certain instances for the wrongful act of the employee. • The employer is responsible for hiring the employee. • Even though a contract has assigned to the provider clearly stated responsibilities, courts have frequently held that the customer is fully or partly liable. Chapter 10 - Managing Guard Operations