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Educational Support Professionals Orientation. Thursday, August 29, 2006 8:30-3:00. Education Support Professionals (ESP’s) . Who are ESP’s? Can they read our minds? Usually! Along with many other talents and skills. Education Support Professionals (ESP’s) . Who are you??

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Educational Support Professionals Orientation


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    1. Educational Support Professionals Orientation Thursday, August 29, 2006 8:30-3:00

    2. Education Support Professionals (ESP’s) • Who are ESP’s? Can they read our minds? Usually! Along with many other talents and skills.

    3. Education Support Professionals (ESP’s) Who are you?? • You perform the day-to-day activities of teaching students while under the supervision of a teacher, including individuals who may or may not be certified but must have completed at least two years of formal education preparation for teaching or the equivalent in experience or training.

    4. Education Support Professionals (ESP’s) BUT WHAT DO YOU DO?? • Help individual students during teacher-led lessons or related tutorials • Gather and prepare lesson materials • Guide reinforcement and enrichment activities • Use their bilingual skills and bicultural knowledge to promote the educational development of students with limited proficiency in English • Assists in the instruction of students using more than one language for teaching content • Assists in the instruction of students in a special education program using more than one language for teaching content

    5. Education Support Professionals (ESP’s) BUT WHAT DO YOU DO?? • Track absenteeism and work with families to promote regular student attendance • Work in school libraries, computer labs, nursing stations, and work experience programs • Contributes to a safe, courteous, and productive school climate by supervising students in the lunchroom, in hallways, and on playgrounds • Monitors the conduct of students in classrooms, detention halls, lunch rooms, playground, hallways, and places where alternatives to classroom instruction are provided (e.g., test sites) • Before and after school hours help students with homework, lead them in special interest clubs, and coach informal sports teams • Supplement the main program's resources to help educationally disadvantaged students reach high academic standards

    6. Education Support Professionals (ESP’s) BUT WHAT DO YOU DO?? • Nurture the emerging social and cognitive competence of students. • Mentor, cajole, and help youngsters learn to say no to destructive impulses and yes to educational opportunity • Contribute to adult education or family literacy programs associated with parent involvement initiatives • Provides academic instruction (e.g., in English, mathematics, a foreign language) to students requiring additional assistance outside of the classroom • Assists in the maintenance and operation of a library by aiding in the selection, ordering, cataloging, processing, and circulation of all media • Assists in the maintenance and operation of a media center by serving as a specialist in the organization and use of all teaching and learning resources, including hardware, content material, and services • Assists a teacher with routine activities associated with teaching (i.e., those activities requiring minor decisions regarding students, such as conducting rote exercises, operating equipment, and clerking)

    7. TEAMING • Students, teachers, staff, parents, families, schools, districts and communities need YOU! (ESP’s). Teaming only occurs when all players are playing. • Communication • Information • Coaching • Support • Mental and Physical Endurance

    8. TEAMING • Your team can only win when the student succeeds holistically: academic, social, emotional, physical, spiritual.

    9. Special Education Services • Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) offers a wide range of Special Education programs and services. Students who qualify for special education services receive an educational program and support services based on their individual needs, with an Individual Education Plan (IEP) developed for each student. Programs and services are provided to students beginning at birth through completion of a secondary education program or age 21. Special education is also available for students attending nonpublic schools.

    10. Special Education Services Provided at All Schools • Special Education Resource ProgramSpecial Education Resource Teachers (SERTs) provide direct and indirect services to students in every school in the areas of academic, emotional/behavioral, motor, social skills, functional and adaptive skills and/or vocational skills for up to half of a students day. Schools develop their own models to meet the individual needs of students. Models range from pull out (small group instruction) to collaborative models, teaming with regular education staff, special education staff and other support services. Parents and staff develop an Individual Education Plan for each student, based on his or her learning needs.

    11. Special Education Services Provided at All Schools • Assistive Technology/Augmentative CommunicationServes students with disabilities who require assistive devices and services to benefit from special education. Services include evaluations to determine technology needs; purchasing/leasing of equipment; selecting, customizing and repairing equipment; and training students, family and staff on use of equipment.

    12. Special Education Services Provided at All Schools • Audiology ServicesServes students who are hearing impaired at the students assigned school (public or nonpublic), pre-kindergarten community site, or home (birth to three program). The Audiology Test Suite, which is used for hearing evaluations, is located at Dowling School. Services include evaluation, consultation, monitoring adaptations, accommodations, FM amplification systems, IEP development and training. 

    13. Special Education Services Provided at All Schools • Developmental Adapted Physical Education (DAPE)Serves students with disabilities who cannot safely or successfully participate in the regular physical education program. Students are identified as having a disability as defined by state criteria.

    14. Special Education Services Provided at All Schools • Occupational & Physical Therapy (OT/PT)Occupational therapy addresses the functional needs of a student; adapted behavior and play; and sensory, motor, postural, and emotional development. Physical therapy addresses the promotion of optimal human health and function through the application of scientific principles to prevent, identify, assess, correct, or alleviate acute or prolonged movement dysfunction related to the educational setting.

    15. Special Education Services Provided at All Schools • Services for Students with Vision DisabilitiesServices are available at all schools for eligible students identified as having a visual disability and who are in need of special education.

    16. Special Education Services Provided at All Schools • School Psychological ServicesAll students are eligible for referral to the school psychologist. Psychological services include:  helping families understand how children learn; consultation regarding academic skills; emotional and behavioral needs, and mental health needs; intervention development, monitoring and evaluation; providing social skills instruction; participation in special education evaluations.  Services are usually provided following staff, parent or school team referral. 

    17. Special Education Services Provided at All Schools • Social Work ServicesAll students are eligible for referral to the social worker. Social work services include: case management services; indirect and direct social work services for students with disabilities; crisis intervention for students and families; consultation with staff regarding social, emotional, and behavioral needs of students; monitoring of procedural safeguards; facilitating parental involvement in educational planning; monitoring students with chronic attendance problems not due to chronic health problems, and students at risk of dropping out; implementing and monitoring behavior management plans; mobilizing and coordinating community and school resources; provision of activities within the school system that benefit students with disabilities and promote their full integration into the mainstream environment.

    18. Special Education Services Provided at All Schools • Speech-Language ServicesServes students with communication disabilities including: oral language, articulation, voice, stuttering and augmentative communication. Service includes direct intervention from an educational speech/language pathologist in the regular or special education classroom, direct intervention outside of classroom, and indirect or consultative service.

    19. Programs And Services in Early Childhood Special Education • Serves students from birth to kindergarten identified as having a Developmental Delay (DD) or other disability. Eligibility is determined through screening at (612) 668-0860, and observation and evaluation through Minneapolis Public Schools. ECSE services are offered through community and home-based, intervention groups, half-days at a school (center-based) and weekly and monthly home visits. Offered at:  Andersen Open, Armatage, Bethune, Broadway, Bryn Mawr, Howe, Jefferson, Longfellow, Morris Park, Park View, Pillsbury, Seward, and St. Annes.

    20. Programs and Services for Academic Learning Disabilities • Coordinated Learning For Academic And Social Success (C.L.A.S.S.) ProgramServes students in grades K-8 who have severe learning and/or language delays which do not allow them to participate in a majority of mainstream classes despite extensive academic interventions. Instruction is offered as necessary in the areas of reading, written expression, mathematics and social skills, with students participating in classes that are appropriate for their age and skill level. Students participate in mainstream classes that are appropriate for their age and skill level. Offered at: • Armatage, Cooper, Kenwood, Lucy Laney, Lyndale, Marcy, North Star, Sheridan • Anthony, Field, Folwell, Franklin, Northeast, Olson, Sanford, Sullivan, W. Harry Davis Academy, Webster

    21. Programs and Services for Academic Learning Disabilities • Life Skills ProgramLife Skills is a cross-categorical program for high school aged students, grades 9-12, whose needs require more intensive special education services than can be provided in federal settings I or II. Students receive more than 60 percent of their school day in special education programming. Whenever appropriate, students also receive instruction in the general education curriculum. Students may have vocational/transition services delivered off campus at a supervised job site. Generally, students in this program are significantly discrepant from peers academically, having failed to make satisfactory progress despite intensive intervention in federal setting I or II programs. Often, these students' academic skills are at the third grade level or below in multiple areas. While Life Skills programs are tailored to meet individual student needs, they generally include a focus on basic academic skills with a shift toward more functional programming and preparing students for independent living and working. • Locations: Henry, North, Roosevelt, South, Southwest

    22. Programs and Services for Students With Emotional and Behavior Disabilities • Special Program for Adolescent Needs (SPAN)Serves students in middle and high school who have emotional and/or behavioral disabilities that adversely affect their progress in the regular education setting despite intensive interventions. Students are in self-contained classrooms on a full or part-time basis. The program provides highly structured individual and small group instruction in academic and social skills necessary for school success. Students attend mainstream classes as appropriate. Offered at middle school:  Middle School (grades 6-8):Andersen Open, Anwatin, Barton, Franklin, Jordan Park High School: Henry, Lehman, Washburn.

    23. Programs and Services for Students With Emotional and Behavior Disabilities • Special Program for Elementary Needs (SPEN)Serves students in elementary school who have significant emotional and/or behavioral problems which adversely affect their academic and social progress, despite intensive interventions. Students are in self-contained classrooms on a full or part-time basis. The program provides highly structured individual and small group instruction in academic and social skills necessary for school success. Students attend mainstream classes as appropriate. Offered at: Bryn Mawr, Dowling, Hall, Northrop, Sheridan, Waite Park

    24. Programs and Services for Students With Emotional and Behavior Disabilities • Self Contained Schools: Harrison,  Minneapolis Crawford and Morris ParkServes students in a self-contained setting with significant emotional, behavior and mental health needs that adversely affect their academic and social progress. Minneapolis students have usually received intensive special education services in SPEN or SPAN programs prior to being placed at Harrison or Crawford or Morris Park schools. Students receive intensive individual academic and behavior management support. High school students also receive career counseling, vocational services and assistance in transitioning to the community.

    25. Programs and Services for Students With Emotional and Behavior Disabilities • Hospital AgenciesServes students placed by the county, courts, or others for care and treatment. These programs provide residential treatment, day treatment and emergency shelter services. A students educational program is provided in coordination with the medical treatment or care plan. These programs are provided at: Childrens Residential Treatment Center, Hennepin County Juvenile Detention Center, Riverside Medical Center, Shriners Hospital, University of Minnesota Hospital, University Day Community Center, and St. Josephs.

    26. Programs and Services for Students With Cognitive/ Neurological/Physical Disabilities • Autism ProgramServes students who have been identified as having autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Neurobiological classrooms serve students who have one of the Autism Spectrum Disorders or other neurobiological disorders including ADHD, Tourettes, OCD, Bi-Polar, etc. Program components include highly structured, individualized programming; intensive communication and language training; social skills training; use of natural environments for instruction; positive behavioral programming; and inclusion with mainstream peers and activities. GRADE LEVELSITES Age 0-3 Home-based Age 3-5 Longfellow, Bethune Elementary, Andersen Elementary (K-5), Bancroft (K-5), Cityview (K-8), Jenny Lind (K-5), Kenny (K-5), Lyndale (K-5), Ramsey (K-8), Whittier (K-5) Middle: Anthony (6-8), Olson (6-8) High School: Edison, Roosevelt, South, Southwest.

    27. Programs and Services for Students With Cognitive/ Neurological/Physical Disabilities • Deaf/Hard of Hearing ProgramServes students with severe to profound hearing loss. The majority of students are served in self-contained classrooms and use manual language as their primary means of communication. Resource services are also available for students with moderate to severe hearing losses who are integrated into general education classes at Sullivan. The Deaf/Hard of Hearing Program is housed at Sullivan; itinerant services are offered at all Minneapolis schools.

    28. Programs and Services for Students With Cognitive/ Neurological/Physical Disabilities • Developmental Cognitive Delay (DCD) ProgramServes students with mild to severe mental disabilities whose needs cannot be met in regular classrooms even with support from special education resource teachers (SERTs). Programs serve a large range of students needs, depending on the severity of their disability and type of program needed.  Services are provided in a variety of settings including general and special education classrooms, community environments, and job training sites.  Services include academic skills, functional and adaptive skills, intellectual functioning, social skills and vocational skills. • Locations: Elementary Schools: Bancroft, Bethune, Dowling, Hiawatha, Jefferson, Lake Harriet Upper, Lake Harriet Lower, Lincoln, Pillsbury Middle Schools: Anthony, Anwatin, Folwell, Northeast, Sanford High Schools: Edison, North, Roosevelt, Washburn

    29. Programs and Services for Students With Cognitive/ Neurological/Physical Disabilities • Physical & Other Health Disabilities ProgramServes students who are identified as Physically Impaired (PI), Other Health Disabilities (OHD), or Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).  Students are served at their school of attendance or at accessible sites with a more comprehensive service model. District consultants provide assistance in planning, evaluation, and developing appropriate programs for all POHI students. 

    30. Programs and Services for Students With Cognitive/ Neurological/Physical Disabilities • Physically Impaired ProgramServes students who are identified as Physically Impaired (PI) and are in need of more intensive services.  Offered at Anwatin, Dowling, North, South, Webster, and W. Harry Davis.

    31. CRAWFORD SCHOOL • Program Description: Crawford classrooms are highly structured special education classrooms that provide individualized instruction to a small group of 8 students.  A highly structured proactive approach to teaching appropriate social and classroom behavior is employed in the school.  Behavior management techniques are based on behavioral principles that are supported by research.

    32. NEW HARRISON EDUCATION CENTER • Program Description: New Harrison classrooms are highly structured special education classrooms that provide individualized instruction to a small group of 8 students.  A highly structured proactive approach to teaching appropriate social and classroom behavior is employed in the school.  Behavior management techniques are based on behavioral principles that are supported by research.

    33. TRANSITION PLUS SERVICES • Program Description: Transition Plus Services is a community-based program for secondary students with disabilities ages 18 to 21. The mission of the program is to provide individually designed instruction and service coordination to address transition needs of students as they move from school to community, home, and work environments.

    34. Minneapolis Special Education Student Counts 12/01/05 • ASD 431 • DCD Mi/Mod. 252 • DCD Sev/Prof. 115 • D/HH 114 • Developmental Delay 631 • EBD 936 • OHI 349 • PI 55

    35. Minneapolis Special Education Student Counts 12/01/05Continued • Sev. Mult. Imp. 43 • SNAP 1924 • SLD 476 • Speech/Lang. 685 • TBI 24 • Visual Imp. 18 TOTAL: 6053 Total unofficial enrollment: 38680

    36. QUESTIONS