OCCUPATIONAL ANIMAL EXPOSURE - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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OCCUPATIONAL ANIMAL EXPOSURE
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OCCUPATIONAL ANIMAL EXPOSURE

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  1. OCCUPATIONAL ANIMAL EXPOSURE

  2. WHAT IS ZOONOSIS These diseases cause infections that spread between animals and people. Every year, tens of thousands of Americans will get sick from diseases spread between animals and people.

  3. ZOONOTIC DISEASES

  4. There are 5 main routes of disease transmission: • Aerosol- occurs when droplets are passed through the air from an infected animal and are breathed in by a person. • Vector- occurs when an insect acquires a pathogen from one animal and transmits it to a person. TRANSMISSION ROUTES OF ZOONTIC DISEASES

  5. Oral- occurs when ingesting food or water contaminated with a pathogen.Direct Contact- requires the presence of a pathogen in the environment or within an infected animal. Fomite- is an inanimate (non-living) object that can carry a pathogen from an animal to a person. Example, chains, brushes, needles, clothing, and bedding. TRANSMISSION ROUTES OF ZOONTIC DISEASES- cont.

  6. OCCUPATIONAL ANIMAL EXPOSURE

  7. INDIRECT ANIMAL EXPOSURE Staff members who have indirect but close proximity exposure to animals need to be provided with the appropriate awareness training. Coming into contact with areas where animals live and roam, or objects or surfaces that have been contaminated with germs can put you at risk. Examples include aquarium tank water, pet habitats, chicken coops, plants, and soil as well as pet food and water dishes.

  8. DIRECT ANIMAL EXPOSURE Persons working with animals are at more of a risk for zoonotic disease transmission than people who do not work with animals. Zoonotic agents are infectious agents that can be transmitted from animals to humans or from humans to animals. Zoonoses can cause minor or serious illness. In some cases, the organism involved infect people, but they do not become ill. Other zoonoses can be very dangerous to people, especially anyone with an immune system weakened by age, illness or pregnancy. Animals may shed a variety of bacterial species that can cause illness in people, i.e, coming into contact with saliva, blood, urine, mucous, feces, or other body fluids of infected animals. Examples include bites, scratches, petting or touching animals.

  9. ANIMALS EXPOSURE- Do’s

  10. ANIMALS EXPOSURE- Don’ts

  11. EMPLOYEES WITH ALLERGIES

  12. MINIMIZING YOUR RISK The most effective way to control and prevent allergies is to minimize exposure to allergens. If you work with animals in a laboratory setting, the following practices may help reduce your exposure to animal allergens:

  13. ALLERGY SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS Rhinitis (runny nose and sneezing similar to hay fever) Conjunctivitis (irritation and tearing of the eyes) Asthma, and/or dermatitis (skin reactions). Allergic reactions are implicated if symptoms are reduced or stop after leaving the workplace.

  14. INJURY REPORTING Report suspected allergic reactions or zoonotic illnesses to your Supervisor or Principal Investigator and submit a First Report of Injury. All First Reports of Injury must be submitted online through Origami and can be found on the Human Resources website. http://hr.tamucc.edu/Time_Leave/Workers_Comp.html