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GAS ontology: an ontology for collaboration among ubiquitous computing devices. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies (May 2005) Presented By Eleni Christopoulou, Achilles Kameas Research Academic Computer Technology Institute Design of Ambient Intelligent Systems Group, Greece

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GAS ontology: an ontology for collaboration among ubiquitous computing devices


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    1. GAS ontology: an ontology for collaboration among ubiquitous computing devices International Journal of Human-Computer Studies (May 2005) Presented By Eleni Christopoulou, Achilles Kameas Research Academic Computer Technology Institute Design of Ambient Intelligent Systems Group, Greece Summerized By Jaeseok Myung

    2. Introduction • eGadget Project • A research project funded by EU IST/FET • The goal of this project is to deliver an architectural framework that supports the composition of ubiquitous computing systems • GAS (Gadgetware Architectural Style) • A key issue in the project is the heterogeneity of the devices • GAS Ontology • Represents basic concepts and their inter-relations • A common language • Semantic interoperability among the heterogeneous devices • Should be flexible and extensible • so that new concepts can be added and represented Center for E-Business Technology

    3. Basic Concepts • eGadgets (eGts) • Everyday physical objects enhanced with sensing, acting, processing and communication abilities • Building blocks to form GadgetWorlds • Plugs • Software classes that make visible the eGt capabilities to people and to other eGts • Synapses • Associations between two plugs • eGadgetWorlds • Dynamic, distinguishable, and functional configurations of associated eGts, which communicate and/or collaborate in order to realized a collective behaviour. Center for E-Business Technology

    4. The Notion of eGadgetWorlds • Constructing eGadgetWorlds Center for E-Business Technology

    5. Need for GAS Ontology • Conceptualization of eGadgetWorlds • Provide a new world view constituted of the set of basic terms, their definitions and their inter-relations which are defined by the GAS • Semantic Interoperability among eGadgets • The eGts have to use the same language and a common vocabulary • Although each may implement a different mechanism to interpret them • Dynamic Nature of eGadgetWorlds • Synapses between eGts can be created and removed dynamically • We need formal rules in order to handle some changes and failures • Semantic Service Discovery • We can use the semantic description of the eGts’ capabilities • so that we can discover all the relevant services Center for E-Business Technology

    6. GAS Ontology Design • Ontology Layers • GAS Core Ontology(GAS-CO) • GAS Higher Ontology(GAS-HO) • The GAS-CO provides eGts with the necessary common language that we need in order to describe their acquired knowledge represented by the GAS-HO Center for E-Business Technology

    7. GAS Core Ontology • As a Common Language • All eGts must have same GAS-CO to communicate each other • Cannot be changed either from the manufacturer or from an user • Should contain only the necessary information in order to be small Center for E-Business Technology

    8. GAS Higher Ontology • Describes instances of the classes defined from the GAS-CO • Represents the private knowledge of each eGadget • The size can be ‘unlimited’ and depending on eGt’s memory • Can be changed dynamically • GAS-HO-static • eGt’s plugs, services • GAS-HO-volatile • Synapses Center for E-Business Technology

    9. GAS Ontology Development • GAS ontology is written in DAML+OIL • Protégé-2000 is selected as an ontology development tool Center for E-Business Technology

    10. Summary • The ontologies can help us to address some key issues of ubiquitous computing environments • Knowledge representation • Semantic interoperability • Service discovery • The GAS Ontology • Describes the semantics of the basic concepts and their relations • Provides a common language for the communication and collaboration among the heterogeneous devices • Supports the service discovery mechanism Center for E-Business Technology

    11. Paper Evaluation • Strong Points • Provide a new world view (eGadgetWorlds) • Provide a new way for layering ontologies • general and domain-specific vs. common and private • Weak Points • Too simple example • Explanation is poor • for the architecture • for the development tools and languages Center for E-Business Technology

    12. Discussion • GAS vs. CONON vs. SOUPA • As a candidate for representing real-world contexts • Who can make a standard ontology? • How the standard ontology is maintained? Center for E-Business Technology