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Lakia M. Scott University of North Carolina at Charlotte Advancing Literacy: Literacy & Learning for All April 18, 2013 # teachersavvy. Using Speech- & Tech-Savvy Tools to Increase Student Literacy Outcomes across the Content Areas. This presentation will discuss:

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Lakia M. Scott

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Advancing Literacy: Literacy & Learning for All

April 18, 2013

#teachersavvy

Using Speech- & Tech-Savvy Tools to Increase Student Literacy Outcomes across the Content Areas

introduction

This presentation will discuss:

    • Code-switching as an intervention in addressing the academic reading and writing needs of urban African American learners
    • Historical text of language constructs to measure urban African American student achievement
    • The need for code-switching strategies to become a routine practice in urban classrooms
    • This presentation addresses the need to integrate technology practices
Introduction
what is the urban dialect

Dialect Shifting

    • Addition of syllables, and/or pronunciations in oral/written contexts (Champion et al., 2010)
  • Code-Switching
    • Interplay between multiple languages (Clyne, 1987; Genesse, 1989)
  • Activity Two: SLM
What is the Urban Dialect?
historical language constructs

Language Discourse

    • Standard American English (SAE) (Champion et al., 2002; Connor & Craig, 2006; Conner et al, 2003)
    • African American Vernacular English (AAVE) (Craig, Thompson, Washington, & Potter, 2003; Oetting & McDonald, 2001; Rickford & Rickford, 2000)
Historical Language Constructs…
how does it relates to achievement

National statistics regarding African American literacy achievement

  • Comparison within ethnic groups  problematic (Hopkins, 2008)
  • Policy, teacher preparation programs, other factors that attribute to student performance (Champion, Rosa-Lugo, Rivers, & McCabe, 2010; Kornhaber, 2004; Utley, 2002)
  • Teaching the 21st century urban learner (Dalton & Grisham, 2001; Jetnikoff, 2009; Moore-Hart, 2004)
How Does it Relates to Achievement?
african american female reading achievement

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 1971, 1975, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1999, 2004 and 2008 Long-Term Trend Reading Assessments.

African American Female Reading Achievement
african american male reading achievement

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 1971, 1975, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1999, 2004 and 2008 Long-Term Trend Reading Assessments.

African American Male Reading Achievement
theory practice

Gramsci’s analysis (Lemert, 2010)

    • Cultural hegemony
    • Ideological domination
      • ‘Acting White’ = doing well
      • ‘Acting Black’ = failing well
  • Changing Perceptions
  • Reference Texts
    • GLB: Dreamkeepers
    • H: Star Teachers
    • K: Master Teachers
    • K: Global Teachers
Theory & Practice
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Technology & Literacy in RESEARCH & ACTION:

    • Twitter  time to get to work
    • #hashtagsand @sending messages
    • Activity Three: I Read – You TWEET

Moore-Hart (2004/2005) discussed how to shape curriculum to represent classroom diversity for early grade level students by using electronic contexts to promote reading and writing literacy. Modeling to students how to use technology to find related information helped to reinforce their cultural identities and also allowed the students to work in small groups to learn about other cultures. The study discussed how the wide variety of information available via the internet helped to increase the reading skills of students and the associated classroom activities assisted in developing writing skills. Students documented their findings and summaries in learning logs and visual maps using images found online. Implications from this research were: (1) hypermedia and multimedia should be a common practice for young learners; (2) this practice will further develop a diverse learning setting with a wide range of resources; and (3) teachers must follow a process approach to learning by providing meaningful contexts that emerge from the students’ cultural and personal experiences (Moore-Hart, 2004/2005).

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Technology & Literacy in RESEARCH & ACTION:

  • Jetnikoff (2009) encouraged the emersion between literacy and technology, but also addressed the anxieties that some educators may face when considering this approach. As a younger generation may be more versed at navigated through the world wide web and in the usage of recent social media sites, instructors must not be ‘technophobic’ about embracing these strategies in the classroom. Instead, Jetnikoff (2009) suggests that instructors become digital travelers by exploring podcasts, blogs, vodcasts, and digital stories with their students. The reluctance to teach new technologies is lessened when digital natives (students who are highly advanced with these applications) are also seen as mediators during instruction. Furthermore, the integration of digital storytelling and social networks help to create literary responses to readings on the students’ terms.
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Technology & Literacy in RESEARCH & ACTION:

Tarasiuk (2010) increased literacy instruction by using technology as the medium between the teacher and students. In middle school English courses (grades sixth through eighth), she found that students had lost interest in traditional instructional practices of reading a text and then writing reports and/or forming collaborative study groups. After surveying students about their interests in reading and also observing the students in a computer lab setting, Tarasiuk (2010) realized that students were more engaged and attentive to social media sites and also participated in language constructs when emailing, instant messaging, and participating in reading blogs. She also noticed that students had increased their levels of reading by looking at news stories, fashion and celebrity blogs, sports sites, and even online novels. Using Wikis and digital book talks, her students began to increase their participate in reading and writing projects and were more apt to continuing the conversation outside of classroom time. From this instructional transition, Tarasiuk (2010) evidences that she did more facilitation of learning and allowed students to become more comprehensive in understanding the texts. Also noted, students became peer-teachers to others who weren’t as advanced to the various technology methods used in the classes. Overall, the integration of technology allowed students to become more involved in reading, writing, and communicating using multiple digital tools and resources.

implications for urban educators

Immediate integration of code-switching practices as part of professional development for urban school educators

  • Use discussion boards, chat rooms, blogging, and digital study boards to encourage student reading and writing.
  • Encourage multimedia searches and usage to help express student views
  • Be creative with assignments via podcasts, vlogs, and presentation tools
  • Encourage e-learning devices as part of instruction
Implications for Urban Educators
implications for administrators

Re-evaluate forms of assessment for culturally diverse school populations

  • Encourage professional development centered around appropriating language structures in the classroom
  • Mandate that teachers become more accountable for their cultural climates in the classroom
  • Discuss and take action on hidden curriculums that exist in the schools/districts.
  • Attain funding for e-learning devices
Implications for Administrators
implications for policy makers

Consider curriculum reform specific to the demographic needs of school populations; not generalizable to the district

  • Revisit policies centered around standardized assessments; no two children are the same
  • Mandate professional development opportunities for districts to become more culturally responsive; linguistic needs of students
  • Research the value in e-learning devices and overall technological accessibility for urban school populations
Implications for Policy Makers
conclusion

Integration  impact on urban learners and literacy ratings

  • Increased motivation in academia
  • Affirmation of cultural/generational identities through technology
  • Redirecting the focus away from deficit model interpretations, but centered on engagement
Conclusion