77103 programming for interactive media n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
77103 Programming for Interactive Media PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
77103 Programming for Interactive Media

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 12
Download Presentation

77103 Programming for Interactive Media - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

0 Views
Download Presentation

77103 Programming for Interactive Media

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. 77103 Programming for Interactive Media Lectorial 2.01a – Welcome & Overview after this session you should be able to explain the expectations for this module identify your module tutors for PIM explain what different sessions you will attend describe what a computer program is describe what a programming language is Paul Warren - pim 2.01a

  2. Aims of the Module • to introduce the concepts of high-level programming • to develop relevant principles of good programming practice and style • to develop techniques for problem solving and algorithm expression techniques • to be able to develop programmed solutions Paul Warren - pim 2.01a

  3. Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module,students will be able to: (1) Demonstrate understanding of the fundamental concepts of high-level programming (2) Develop algorithms to solve simple problems using computer programs (3) Develop (individually) and demonstrate a substantial piece of software to solve a given problem (4) Produce simple applications (5) Apply basic problem solving skills Paul Warren - pim 2.01a

  4. Module Assessment Strategy • 100% Assessed Course-Work (ACW) • Build up a portfolio of 4 lab exercises, ie, weekly exercises to be started in the set lab sessions, and finished in your own time • Exercises build towards a single website, which is submitted at the end of the course • includes development and demonstration of an Internet-based Javascript application • we will be checking your progress each week ! Paul Warren - pim 2.01a

  5. Your Tutors • module manager, lecturer • Paul Warren • lecturer in computing within SANM • previous career as a contract programmer • laboratory demonstrators, drop-in tutors • Darren Stephens (possible) • computer lab officer • sundry postgrad students (possible) Paul Warren - pim 2.01a

  6. Learning Strategy • Each week you will attend • a 1-hour lectorial session (compulsory) • a 2-hour lab session (compulsory) • working with a lab partner : pair programming • solving problems both on paper and using code • a 1 hour seminar session (optional) • techniques for and solutions to various exercises • for those that want help or deeper discussion • bring some written material along as a starting point Paul Warren - pim 2.01a

  7. Recommended Texts • Primary • "DOM Scripting" : Keith (2005) Friends of Ed : ISBN 1-59059-533-5 • Secondary • "JavaScript & AJAX" (6th edn.) : Negrino & Smith (2007) Peachpit Press : ISBN 0-321-43032-8 • "JavaScript for Dummies" (4th edn.) : Vander Veer (2004) Wiley : ISBN 0-764-57659-3 • online resources will be pointed out to you Paul Warren - pim 2.01a

  8. Content • several key areas • fundamental programming concepts • Object Oriented Programming • the Javascript language • good technique • ability to look up documentation • self-confidence Paul Warren - pim 2.01a

  9. What is a Computer program? keyboard function function function function data function function function function screen Paul Warren - pim 2.01a

  10. Programming Languages • computers are just machines - they have a set of simple controls • everything is represented by control codes • send data, receive data, store data • add, subtract, multiply, divide • compare data : make decisions • repeat • but code numbers aren't user-friendly • modern high-level languages are designed to look more like English or maths notation • Cyberman example Paul Warren - pim 2.01a

  11. Examples • machine code (1845-1945) 6D 45 71 78 78 7A 0C 00 • FORTRAN (1953) WRITE (42,*) 42 FORMAT(6H1Hello) • COBOL (1959) DISPLAY "Hello" UPON CONSOLE. • Java (1991) System.Out.println("Hello\n"); • Ruby (1993) puts "Hello" Paul Warren - pim 2.01a

  12. Questions? Paul Warren - pim 2.01a