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Consumers in the design process

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  1. Consumers in the design process www.ddss.arch.tue.nl dr.ir. Jos van Leeuwen Design Systems Group Eindhoven University of Technology

  2. DDSSDesign and Decision Support Systems Research on: • Decision making and choice behaviour • Interactions between actors (human/computer)involved in planning and design processes

  3. Design Systemsgroup Urban Planninggroup DDSSDesign and Decision Support SystemsResearch Programme

  4. Consumers in the design process The consumer is: • Client (having requests, paying you) • Subject (to give shelter to) • Object (making noise, producing heat) • Actor (performing, interacting with the building) • Participant (having influence on the process)

  5. The role of simulationin this context • Evaluating the consumer’s experience of the built environment • Finding out the performance requested by the consumer • Enabling the consumer to participate in the design process: immediate feedback

  6. What do we simulate? • The built environment (various levels) • Designed environments • Behaviour of users • The consequences of design decisions

  7. Example projects • Reliability and validity of interactive VR experiments inmeasuring travel behaviour • Measuring and predicting users’ satisfaction and preferences in design • Conformance checking by capturing and simulating human behaviour in the built environment

  8. Reliability and validity of interactive VR experiments in measuring travel behaviour Amy Tan, MSc. ir. Joran Jessurun To assess the reliability and validityof interactive computer experiments,based on virtual reality systems, in the context of measuring activity-scheduling behaviour. Measure how accurate individuals are ableto recall and retrieve every day memories,and in particular data about the travel behaviour, in a VR environment.

  9. Research method • Compare the existing methods of data collection (diaries / questionnaires)against a benchmark (reality) • Compare the new methods of data collection (VR experiments)against a benchmark (reality) • Compare accuracy levels between the above methods

  10. Stereoscopic panorama’s • Rotating double cameraswith fisheye lens • Stitching the two images • Stereo correction and display

  11. Simulation environment • Orientation • Speed • Vehicle • Time of travel • Back-tracking • Information • Entry ofactivity data Demo 1 (12MB)

  12. Measuring and predicting users’ satisfaction and preferences in design Maciej Orzechowski, MSc. Measuring modifications that users maketo a design in a VR environment, to be able to estimate and predict the users’ preferences statistically.

  13. Research method • A VR application with simple CAD functionality for non-experts • Measuring the interaction with the model during ‘design’ sessions • Possibility to find weak points (where the knowledge about preferences is insufficient) • Improve data collection by direct feedback (the system will ask questions)

  14. VR applicationin a ‘desk cave’ Demo 2 (14MB)

  15. Conformance checking by capturing and simulating human behaviour in the built environment Prof. Bauke de Vries ir. Joran Jessurun Application of VR as an interface to a simulation through cellular automata of the behaviour of humans in a building.

  16. Spatial organisation Circulation system Signs Motivations to simulatehuman behaviour • Way finding • Hazard situations • Crowding/queuing • Perception • Efficiency • Training

  17. Research method Experiments Simulation Observation Rules Parameters Match Demo 3 (23MB)

  18. Validation Are we able to simulate correctly: • Time per person to find a chair • Deviation from shortest path • Distance covered per person to find a chair • Distribution of seated person over time • Distribution of standing persons over time • Relocation of persons

  19. General conclusion Simulation technologies and VR enable usto involve consumer issuesin the development ofdesign and decision support systems

  20. Desk Caveconfiguration • 2 PC’s with dualmonitor output • 4 LCD Projectors