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Positive Behaviour for Learning INTRODUCTION. P ositive B ehaviour for L earning. PBL is … a broad range of systemic and individualised strategies for achieving important social and learning outcomes while preventing problem behaviour.

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Positive Behaviour for Learning INTRODUCTION


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    1. Positive Behaviour for LearningINTRODUCTION

    2. Positive Behaviour forLearning PBL is … a broad range of systemic and individualised strategies for achieving important social and learning outcomes while preventing problem behaviour.

    3. Pastoral Care and Wellbeing Framework for Learning I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full (Jn 10:10)

    4. DBB Pastoral Care and Wellbeing Framework for Learning Pastoral Care refers to the action taken by schools to promote and enhance personal, social, physical, emotional, mental and spiritual wellbeing. Optimal wellbeing is characterised by positive feelings and attitude, positive relationships with others, resilience and satisfaction with self and experiences and engagement in learning. Diocese of Broken Bay (2012), Pastoral Care Policy for Diocesan Systemic Schools. The DBB Pastoral Care and Wellbeing Framework for Learningis based on the National Safe Schools Framework. The framework and resource manual (including school audit tool) can be found on the Pastoral Care and Wellbeing site. http://wellbeing.dbbcso.org/

    5. PCF Pathway 1: Leadership Commitment Pastoral Care & Wellbeing for Learning PCF Pathway 4: Professional learning

    6. POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR for LEARNING PBL is … a whole school approach to Behaviour Management that adopts proactive strategies for defining, teaching, and supporting appropriate student behaviours to create positive school environments.

    7. How PBL fits the bigger picture… 9

    8. NSW Board of Studies Compliance 5.6.2 . . . Provide a safe and supportive environment . . . policies and procedures that provide for student welfare 5.7.2 . . . Policies and procedures related to the discipline of students 10

    9. “The most effective professional development that results in lasting school change is that which involves the whole staff as well as provides ongoing support for a behaviour team and classroom teachers.” p26 11

    10. PASTORAL CARE AND WELLBEING Framework for Learning

    11. The Ten Pathways

    12. PBL in Diocese of Broken Bay Pastoral Care and Wellbeing Team leader Christine Rheinberger PBIS (George Surgai, Tim Lewis US) Network (inter Diocesan Network PBL / PBS) Education Officer – Behaviour Management PBL Coordinator Patti Beattie Mentor (Natalie Swayn QLD) PBL Master Coaches Luisa Lawicki PBL Master Coaches Natalie Ingram Network of PBL Coaches Pen, NS, CC School PBL Teams

    13. PBL in Diocese of Broken Bay Central Coast • East Gosford • Lake Munmorah • Woy Woy • Wyoming • Warnervale • The Entrance • Wyong North Shore • Chatswood • Lindfield • Pennant Hills • Pymble • St Ives • Willoughby • Berowra • Carlingford • Wahroonga • Waitara Peninsula • Avalon • Collaroy • Freshwater • Mona Vale • Manly • Narrabeen • Dee Why • Forestville • Davidson • Narraweena

    14. Phases of Development • Readiness Phase • Introduction Phase • Implementation Phase • Sustainability Phase

    15. Behaviour Principles There are five principles that lay the foundation necessary for promoting appropriate positive behaviours

    16. Understanding the Science of Behaviour Principle #1 Behaviour is anythingwe say or do All we do is behave

    17. Understanding the Science of Behaviour Principle #2 Behaviour is how we react to our environment Our behaviours tend to be triggered by an ‘event’ around (or in) us.

    18. Understanding the Science of Behaviour Principle #3 Behaviours meet a need: Get? attain / obtain / request Avoid?escape / protest fight/flight The behaviours we choose are purposeful. It is our best attempt to get us what we want OR avoid what we don’t want - to meet specific needs / goals / functions. • Skill set • Context

    19. Behaviour Communicates • A message when a child does not have language • Used instead of language by a child who has limited social skills

    20. Understanding the Science of Behaviour Principle #4 Behaviours are often learned Behaviours often continue because they work! They serve a purposeorfunction.We engage in behaviours because we have learned that a desired outcome occurs

    21. Understanding the Science of Behaviour Principle #5 Replacement behaviours need to be taught explicitly. • Teach expected behaviours explicitly • Provide time to Practiceexpected behaviours • Encourage students to Applythese behaviours in different settings • Acknowledgewhen attemptsare made at meeting expectations of behaviour.

    22. When a student can not read ... • we teach When a student can not calculate or problem solve… • we teach When a student can not write... • we teach When a student can not behave … • we punish!

    23. Replacement Behaviours Need to be Taught TEACH PRACTICE APPLY ACKNOWLEDGE

    24. BEHAVIOUR is functionally related to the TEACHING ENVIRONMENT Buildings and People

    25. PBL is the redesign of environments,not the redesign of individuals.

    26. You can not make anyone change their behaviour !

    27. Piano Stairs http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lXh2n0aPyw

    28. approx 15% TERTIARY PREVENTION: Specialised individualised Systems for Students with High – Risk Behaviour. Manage Behaviour. SECONDARY PREVENTION: Specialised Group systems for students with At-Risk behaviour. Support, re-educate, teach behaviour 1 - 5% POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR for Learning PRIMARY PREVENTION: School Wide Systems for all students, staff and settings ‘Universal Approach’ approx 80% School wide Positive Behaviour Support Lewis 2002

    29. (WHOLE SCHOOL) Universals ‘Primary’ Preventingthe development of new cases of problem behaviour. FOCUS ON: all students and staff across all settings – whole school, classroom and non classroom settings School wide Positive Behaviour Support Lewis 2002

    30. What are we currently doing to prevent problem behaviour? Primary Prevention

    31. (TARGETED) ‘Secondary’ Focus: Reducing the number of existing cases of problem behaviour Support, re-educate, teach behaviour Specialised Group systems for students with At-Risk behaviour. School wide Positive Behaviour Support Lewis 2002

    32. What are we currently doing to reduce the number of existing cases of problem behaviour? Secondary Prevention

    33. (INTENSIVE) ‘Tertiary’ Managing the intensity and complexity of existing individual cases resistant to lower tier prevention efforts Specialised individualised Systems for Students with High – Risk Behaviour. Manage Behaviour. School wide Positive Behaviour Support Lewis 2002

    34. What are we currently doing to manage complex individual cases? Tertiary Prevention

    35. Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success ACADEMIC SYSTEMS BEHAVIOURAL SYSTEMS Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • High Intensity Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • High Intensity Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response Universal Interventions • All students • Preventive, proactive Universal Interventions • All students • Preventive, proactive

    36. POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR for LEARNING [PBL] PBL is … a whole school approach to Behaviour Management that adopts proactive strategies for defining, teaching, and supporting appropriate student behaviours to create positive school environments.

    37. Positive Behaviour for Learning PBL Social Competence & Academic Achievement OUTCOMES Supporting Decision Making Supporting Staff Behaviour DATA SYSTEMS PRACTICES Supporting Student Behaviour

    38. School-wide Positive Behaviour for Learning Systems Classroom Setting Systems Nonclassroom Setting Systems Individual Student Systems School-wide Systems

    39. 44

    40. PBL….. • Views the system, setting, or skill deficiency as the most likely source of problem behaviour • Adjusts systems and settings and improves skills • Identifies and teaches replacement skills and builds relationships

    41. PBL…. • Relies primarily on positive approaches • Has a goal of sustained results achieved over time • Is developed by a collaborative team

    42. PBL…. • Problem behaviours have clear consequences • Student behaviour is monitored and staff receive regular feedback – data • Positive Behavioural Support strategies are designed to meet the needs of all students

    43. PBL is not... • Not a ‘magic cure!” • Not a specific package or curriculum… it’s a structured “process” • Not warm and fuzzy….it is systematic and evidence based • Not about watering down consequences • Not limited to any particular group of students… it’s for all students • Not new… it’s based on long history

    44. Gallup survey on work satisfaction“What the Worlds Greatest Managers Do Differently” -- Buckingham & Coffman 2002, GallupInterviews with 1 million workers, 80,000 managers, in 400 companies. For Employees • I know what is expected of me at work. • I have the materials and equipment I need to do my job right. • I regularly receive recognition or praise for doing good work. • My supervisor or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person. • There is someone at work who encourages my development. • The mission/purpose of my company makes me feel my job is important.

    45. What if We Re-word it for Students • I know what is expected of me at school. • I have the academic and behavioural skills I need to succeed. • At school today, I received recognition or praise for doing good work or behaving appropriately. • My teacher or someone at school seems to care about me as a person. • There is someone at school who encourages my development. • The mission/purpose of the school makes my effort seem important.