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Parts of a sentence. Question. What’s the difference between parts of speech and parts of a sentence?. Theory. What are the main parts of a sentence? Subject = who or what the sentence is about Predicate = who or what the subject is doing. Practice.

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Parts of a sentence


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question
Question

What’s the difference between parts of speech and parts of a sentence?

theory
Theory
  • What are the main parts of a sentence?
  • Subject = who or what the sentence is about
  • Predicate = who or what the subject is doing
practice
Practice
  • Handout – More grammar: Parts of a sentence
  • Vertical line to separate the subject from the predicate
  • Draw a single line under the subject and a double line under the main verb
  • 10 minutes = if you’re done, share with your partner
a bit further
...a bit further
  • Subject complements = a noun describing the subject BUT it appears after the verb.
  • Maria is a doctor - doctor is a subject complement because it describes the subject.
  • Can be identified by a linking verb = be, become, appear, taste, prove, grow, look, remain, seem, feel, sound.
  • These verbs do not describe an action.
  • http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/linkingverb.htm
a bit further still
...a bit further still
  • Object nouns = nouns that receive the action of the verb
  • Often answers the question ”what”
  • Maria likes pizza.
    • What does Maria like? Pizza
slide8

Traditional forms of educational video include film, broadcast television and video cassette playback.

    • ...include what? Film, broadcast television and video cassette playback. = object nouns
keep going
...keep going
  • Main verb vs auxiliary verb
  • Main verb = main action
  • Auxilary verb = helper verb = workhorse (be, do, can, would, should, might, will)
  • Compared to traditional forms of video which are viewed primarily in a linear sequence, digital video permits more effective interactivity and control, as video elements can be quickly selected by the user, or controlled by a computer program, in any desired sequence.
practice1
Practice
  • Mark parts of the predicate, e.g. the main verb and any auxiliary verbs, object nouns or subject complements. Notice where the adverbs are and think about all those other elements in the passage.
question1
Question

What is the difference between a phrase and a clause?

a clause
A clause

A clause has a subject and a verb.

I wept.

The big brown bear was blowing bubbles.

Although I am a teacher, I still have much to learn.

a phrase
A phrase

A phrase is a group of words that does not include a subject or a verb or may indeed be missing both.

the ancient oak tree (noun phrase = no verb)on a jet plane (prepositional phrase = no verb)

question2
Question

What is the difference between a dependentclause and an independent clause?

independent clause
Independent clause

An independent clause has a subject and a verb, and expresses a complete thought. It can stand alone.

  • I am a teacher. (independent clause – subject, verb and a complete thought)
dependent clause
Dependent clause
  • A dependent clause has a subject and a verb but does not express a complete thought. Its meaning is not clear without an independent clause.
  • Although I am a teacher, I still have much to learn. (Although…teacher, = dependent clause. It has a subject and a verb but the thought is incomplete. The meaning is not clear without the independent clause ‘I still have much to learn.’)
homework intensive reading
Homework: Intensive reading
  • Pick a paragraph or two from your reference article and mark it for the following things.
    • subject
    • predicate
    • main subject
    • main verb
    • auxiliary (helper) verbs
    • independent clauses
    • dependent clauses
    • phrases (prepositional, noun, adverbial, etc.)
    • object nouns - If you can answer the question ‘what’ after the verb, you have yourself an object. E.g., I found a peanut. I found what? ‘A peanut’ = peanut is the object of the verb ‘found’ ; it is receiving the action of being found.
    • subject complements – these are things describing the subject and are usually introduced by some form of the verb ‘to be’. E.g. The fog was so thick that I couldn’t see my hand in front of my face. Subject complement = thick.