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Ensuring Effective Secondary Programs and Post-Secondary Outcomes: Pennsylvania’s Indicator 13 Process Cohort 5 Series Overview. Today’s Agenda. Part I: Introducing the Indicator 13 Training Process Transition Background State Performance Plan Indicator 13 IEP Review Checklist

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

Ensuring Effective Secondary Programs and Post-Secondary Outcomes: Pennsylvania’s Indicator 13 ProcessCohort 5Series Overview

today s agenda
Today’s Agenda

Part I: Introducing the Indicator 13 Training Process

  • Transition Background
  • State Performance Plan
  • Indicator 13 IEP Review Checklist

Part II:PA’s Process for Addressing Transition

Part III: Using the Indicator 13 IEP Review Checklist

today s objectives
Today’s Objectives
  • Introduce the Indicator 13 Cohort 5 training series to school teams
    • Explain how we will be working together this year to improve the quality of IEPs and overall transition services
    • Explain PA’s six step process for transition (further developed at future trainings)
    • Learn how to use the Indicator 13 IEP Review Checklist
objectives for cohort 5 training series
Objectives for Cohort # 5 Training Series
  • As a result of this entire training series, participants will be able to:
    • Develop IEPs that include:
      • Clearly written Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance
      • Post-secondary goals that are based upon age appropriate transition assessments
      • Meaningful transition services and activities that will help the student to achieve his/her post-secondary goals
      • Measurable Annual Goals that address skill deficits and provide for progress monitoring

5

objectives for cohort 5 training series1
Objectives for Cohort # 5 Training Series
  • As a result of this entire training series, participants will be able to:
    • Implement effective practices that will lead to successful postsecondary outcomes for students with disabilities.
    • Utilize ongoing assessment and progress monitoring practices to guide transition planning.
    • Work collaboratively with students, families, education and agency staff in the secondary transition process.

6

slide6

Ensuring Effective Secondary Programs and Post-Secondary Outcomes:Part I: Introducing the Indicator 13 Training ProcessTransition BackgroundState Performance PlanIndicator 13 IEP Review Checklist

7

beginning with the end in mind
Beginning with the end in mind…

We strive to ensure that each student in Pennsylvania:

  • Is proficient in core subjects
  • Graduates from high school, ready for post-secondary education & career
  • Achieves equitable outcomes, regardless of background, condition or circumstances
slide8

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

IDEA 2004

Primary Purpose

To ensure that all children with disabilities have available to them a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent livingH.R.1350 (IDEA 2004)

9

what is secondary transition
What is Secondary Transition?

“a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that is designed within a result-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including post-secondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation.” (IDEA 2004)

10

age requirement in pa
Age Requirement in PA

Pennsylvania Chapter 14 RegulationsJuly, 2008

Transition services must be addressed in the IEP of the student in the year in which the student turns 14 years of age

The IEP team does not have to waituntil the student’s approaching 14th birthday year to consider the student’s transition needs

11

state performance plan spp 20 indicators
Graduation

Drop-Out

Participation and performance on statewide assessments

Suspension and Expulsion

LRE school age students (age 6-21)

LRE early intervention (3-5)

Early intervention improvement goals

Parent involvement

(and 10) Disproportionality

Evaluation timelines

Transition from birth - 3 to early intervention (ages 3-5) program

Transition services for students age 16 – 21

Post-school outcomes

15-20 General Supervision Monitoring, state agency complaints, due process, mediation, resolution sessions, data reporting

State Performance Plan (SPP) – 20 Indicators

12

state performance plan indicator 13
State Performance Plan: Indicator 13
  • Percent of students, age 16 (14 in PA) and above, with IEPs that meet transition requirements
    • coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals, and
    • transition services that will lead to post-secondary goals.
  • Data collected through BSE cyclical monitoring.
  • Target: 100% compliance!
    • 2006 data: 69% compliance
    • 2007 data: 75% compliance
    • 2008 data: 75.1% compliance
    • 2009 data: 76.1% compliance
    • 2010 data: 81.4 % compliance

13

goal 100
Goal = 100%!
  • 2010: Percent of students whose IEPs met Indicator 13 requirements: 81.4%
  • 2010: Percent of students whose IEPs did NOT meet Indicator 13 requirements: 18.6%
who must be trained as part of cohort 5
WHO must be trained as part of Cohort 5?
  • Teams from each LEA/ APS , including:
    • Special Education Director
    • District Transition Coordinator
    • ALL special education staff responsible for writing IEPs for students age 14 or older
    • Other staff responsible for contributing to IEPs
  • Other recommended team members:
    • Principals
    • Guidance counselors
    • School psychologists
    • Career and Technical Education Staff
    • School Nurse
    • General Education Teacher(s)

15

how will training be accomplished
HOW will training be accomplished?
  • From September 2012 through April 2013
    • A combination of:
      • Regional group trainings
      • Review of Indicator 13 IEP Review Checklist (Pre and Post training)
      • Individualized guided practice (usually onsite)
    • According to a customized training plan developed by each LEA/APS in collaboration with IU and/or PaTTAN staff
  • Ending with a follow-up webinar for all Cohort # 5 LEAs/APS on May 1, 2013.

16

what content will be covered
WHAT content will be covered?
  • Indicator 13 requirements
  • Indicator 13 IEP Checklist Pre-Review
  • A process for effective transition planning, including:
    • Age-appropriate transition assessments
    • Post-secondary goals
    • Present Levels of Academic and Functional Performance (PLAAFP)
    • Transition team partnerships
    • Transition Services and Activities
    • Measurable Annual Goals (MAGs)
    • Progress monitoring

17

indicator 13 iep review checklist
Indicator 13 IEP Review Checklist

What it IS:

A tool that is used to:

  • Help educators review their IEPs for overall quality and effective practice, and alignment with Indicator 13 requirements
  • Focus and guide professional development based on needs identified through IEP review
  • Collect data to show the effect of professional development on quality IEPs
  • Promote implementation of effective transition practices

What it’s NOT

  • NOT used to evaluate individual teachers
  • NOT used to evaluate schools or districts
  • NOT used for compliance monitoring
  • NOT to be used without accompanying professional development and individualized guided practice
as a reminder
As a Reminder…

The Indicator 13 Training series promotes Effective Practices for transition planning

Effective practices focus on appropriate transition services and activities to promote positive outcomes for students

This is not a compliance training.

slide21

Ensuring Effective Secondary Programs and Post-Secondary Outcomes: Part II:“PA’s Process for Secondary Transition”

a process for addressing transition
A Process for Addressing Transition

Step One: Use assessment to identify the student’s post- secondary desired goals or vision.

Step Two: Describe the student’s Present Levels of Academic Achievement / Functional Performance (PLAAFP), embedding Assessment data

Step Three: Establish Transition Team partnerships

Step Four: Design a Transition Plan that includes courses of study and Services/Activities (transition grid)

Step Five: Determine Measurable Annual Goals that address skill deficits and lead to post-secondary goals

Step Six: Monitor progress and adjust instruction based on data

training example phillip
Training Example: Phillip

Grade 11

Fully included

Enrolled in a Career Technical Education Auto Body Repair Program

Considering post-secondary education vs. immediate employment

Reading and writing needs

Beginning to develop self advocacy skills

25

slide25

Step One:

Use assessment to identify the student’s post-secondary desired goals or vision.

age appropriate transition assessment is needed to
Age appropriate transition assessment is needed to:

Interests– a measure of opinions, attitudes and preferences

Preferences – what the student values and likes

assessment test
Assessment ≠ test

Assessment = gathering information

Assessments can be formal or informal or a combination of both.

assessing interests and preferences
Assessing Interests and Preferences

Examples:

  • Bridges Interest Inventory
  • Student Transition Surveyor Interview
  • Kuder General Interest Survey (KGIS)
  • COIN Career Guidance System of Assessment
  • Aviator Assessment
  • Casey’s Life Skills Inventory or Personal Preference Indicator
  • Keys2Work
  • Learning Styles Inventory
age appropriate transition assessment is needed to1
Age appropriate transition assessment is needed to:
  • Post-Secondary Education/Training
  • Employment
  • Independent Living
post secondary goals
Post -Secondary Goals
  • Statements of the student’s goals for each area:
    • Post-Secondary Education/Training
    • Employment
    • Independent Living
  • Based on information gathered on interests and preferences
  • For each student, we must address all three areas
  • NOT the same as events that occur IN high school
  • NOT the same thing as IEP Measurable Annual Goals
  • Must be updated annually.
documenting post secondary goals in the iep
Documenting Post-Secondary Goalsin the IEP
  • IEP Team must address each post-secondary goal area.
  • Post-secondary goals are summarized in two places:
    • Present Levels (Post-Secondary Transition bullet)
    • Transition Grid
  • If a post-secondary goal area is not selected:
    • Present education levels must use data to document why.
    • Use statement such as, “The IEP team has documented that a goal and services for this area is not needed at this time.”
    • DO NOT write “N/A”, “none” or leave the goal area blank.
example independent living goal phillip
Example Independent Living Goal: Phillip

NOTE: If a goal area is NOT selected, leave the rest of the grid BLANK!

BUT– present levels must document WHY… see next slide

37

slide37
Why does Phillip not have a goal for Independent Living? Present Education Levels: Functional Performance

Phillip missed only two days of school last year. He had one tardy and no office disciplinary referrals.

Phillip is independent in daily living skills, and plans to eventually live on his own once he is earning a living. He passed his driver’s exam last spring, and drives to his part time job at Pizza Hut. He likes his job, his attendance at work is good, and he reports getting along well with his co-workers and his shift manager. He recently used his earnings to buy a used car, which he enjoys working on.

An informal parent survey, as well as the Comprehensive Informal Inventory of Knowledge and Skills for Transition, were given by the district, and indicate that Phillip is self sufficient and age appropriate in all areas of independent living. He will not need a goal or services for this area.

post secondary education training goals more examples
Post Secondary Education/Training Goals: More Examples

Caroline has a goal of enrolling in postsecondary training in the area of cosmetology or a related field.

Will’s goal is to attend a two year technical school

LeToyia’s goal is to attend a four year college to pursue her interest in working with persons with hearing loss.

Shawna’s goal is to attend an employment training program for work in a clerical area.

Or: The IEP team has documented that a goal and related services/activities for this area is not needed at this time. (Use present levels to document that a goal for this area was considered)

employment goals more examples
Employment Goals: More Examples
  • Caroline has a goal of competitive employment in the area of cosmetology or a related field.
  • Steve plans to seek competitive employment possibly in the trucking industry.
  • Andre plans to seek employment in Video Production after graduation from college.
  • Cindy has a goal of supported employment, possibly in the area of food service.
  • Lee plans to enlist in the Army after High School.
  • Mark’s goal is to work with computers after graduation.
  • Almost every student will have a goal for Employment!
  • Or: The IEP team has documented that, given her intense medical and cognitive challenges, a goal and related services/activities for employment are not appropriate for Diane at this time.
independent living goals example statements
Independent Living Goals: Example Statements

For students who are anticipated to need services:

  • Caroline’s goal is to live independently. (Note: she will need services during HS to reach her goal)
  • Zack’s goal is to live with his family. He will need supports to access community resources.
  • Jill’s goal is to live in an supported apartment, and to access community resources and programs with supports.

Or, for students who are NOT anticipated to need services (based on data):

  • The IEP team has determined that a goal and services in this area are not needed at this time.
identifying student s post secondary goals leads to further assessments
Identifying student’s post secondary goals leads to further assessments…
  • Abilities: talents or acquired skills
  • Aptitudes: combination of characteristics that helps us know if the student might learn or become proficient in a particular area
matching assessments to goals
Matching assessments to goals…

Gathering information to help us know if/how the student can reach his/her goals:

  • Does Phillip have adequate reading skills to succeed in a highly technical postsecondary program?
  • Does Caroline have the reading and math skills needed to succeed in a cosmetology program?
  • Will Zack be able to travel independently to work?
  • What skills will Shawna need to be able to plan and manage meals?
  • What supports will LeToyia need in college?
  • Include this information in Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance.
domains of assessment that inform transition
Domains of Assessment that Inform Transition

Assessment is individualized to include as appropriate:

  • Academic Skills
  • Organizational skills
  • Social Skills
  • Dexterity Skills
  • Communication Skills
  • Self Help Skills
  • Travel Skills
  • Mobility Skills
  • Workplace Values
  • Self Determination and Self Advocacy Skills
  • Other areas based on individual need
examples of assessments of aptitudes
Examples of Assessments of Aptitudes
  • Curriculum-Based Assessments
  • Classroom quizzes comprehension checks, essays, checklists/rubrics
  • Progress monitoring on goals
  • Comprehensive Diagnostic Tool (CDT)
  • 4Sight
  • Keystone
  • PSSA
  • Career and technical education assessments
  • Work Samples
  • Portfolios
  • Information from employers
  • Commercially prepared assessments of specific career-related aptitudes (McCarron-Dial, SAGE, etc.)
  • Observations (Home/School/Community)

46

slide46

Step Two:

Describe the student’s Present Levels of Academic Achievement / Functional Performance (PLAAFP)

(incorporating Assessment data)

present levels of academic achievement and functional performance plaafp
Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (PLAAFP)

It is impossible to write clear and measurable goals if you don’t haveclearandmeasurablepresent levels of academic achievement and functional performance.

49

address each bullet leave no area blank
Address Each Bullet: Leave No Area Blank

Present levels of academic performance

Present levels of functional performance

Present levels related to current post-secondary transition goals (if student is 14, or younger if determined by the IEP team)

Parental concerns for enhancing the education of the student

How student’s disability affects involvement and progress in general education curriculum

Strengths

Academic, developmental, and functional needs related to the student’s disability

50

present levels must
Present Levels Must…
  • Be data driven (measurable and observable).
  • Provide a starting point (baseline) for development of measurable annual goals.
  • Reference gaps in instructional level vs. grade level standards/expectations.
  • Reference post-secondary transition goals.
  • Be relevant, useful and understandable.
  • Incorporate information from all team members.
  • Describe effect of disability on performance.
  • Identify strengths and prioritize needs.
  • Guide development of other areas of the IEP.
example present education levels phillip s post secondary transition information
Example Present Education Levels: Phillip’s Post-Secondary Transition Information

Phillip’s decision to enroll in the auto body program was based on parent survey information, his student interview in which he expressed an interest in cars, and visits to the career and technology school in 8th and 9th grade. Over the past 3 years, Phillip has been given a variety of assessments that include yearly student interviews , PA Career Zone Quick Assessment (9thgr.) and Interest Profiler (10thgr.), and the Self Directed Search (SDS) in 10thgr. In September 2011, he was given the Survey of Work Styles(SWS) and the following aptitude assessments from the SAGE Vocational Aptitude Assessment (Pesco): General, Numerical, Spatial Ability, Finger Dexterity, and Manual Dexterity. Results of these assessments are consistent with previous assessment data and information from the Career Center. These results suggest that Phillip has the aptitude, dexterity, and interest to pursue a career in auto body repair. As required of all students in the district curriculum, Phillip has maintained a career portfolio which documents his career exploration and preparation.

Although the CTE program will prepare him for employment immediately after high school, Phillip is also considering going on to a local technical school or community college to expand his skills or explore a related area. Phillip and his parents feel that additional education would give him more employment options and increase his earning power.

example present education levels phillip s writing
Example Present Education Levels: Phillip’s Writing

Phillip’s English teacher describes his writing as “functional.” He uses word processing for longer writing assignments, and with use of the spelling and grammar check, produces short, concise sentences, although without a great deal of variety. Analysis of assignments completed on word processor indicates that his average sentence length is 8.5 words, with 2 or fewer errors of grammar or omission of words per 100 words. He met last year’s goal of improving his writing using word processing.

Analysis of shorter, pencil and paper writing tasks, from three different classes, indicates the following: Phillip typically writes 7-10 word sentences, with average length of 7.6 words. On a typical sequence of four sentences (approximately 26 words) , he makes on average 1-2 errors of capitalization, end punctuation, grammatical errors of tense or case, or omitting words without realizing it. On the same passage he averages 1-2 spelling errors (usually of longer words rather than sight words). When reminded to read his passage aloud or to himself, or to use a rubric or spelling guide, he is able to correct about 50% of these errors. He has learned the SCOPE strategy and will continue to use it.

Phillip needs to improve the quality and accuracy of his writing in order to meet the expectations of a career in auto body or in a post-secondary program.

indicator 13 checklist question 3
Indicator 13 Checklist Question #3
  • (File Review Question # 289)
  • Evidence that the measurable postsecondary goals were based on age appropriate transition assessment

Question # 3:

  • Is there evidence of age-appropriate transition assessment(s)?§300.320(b)(1)

Review Present Levels of IEP

  • Refer to questions on next slide.

54

guiding questions question 3
Guiding Questions - Question 3

Were age-appropriate assessments (formal or informal assessments of interests, preferences, aptitudes, achievement) conducted in order to develop postsecondary goals?

Is there evidence that assessments are given and/or updated each year? (refer to Question 4F below)

Was all assessment data interpreted and utilized in the development of the present levels, postsecondary goals and transition services and activities?

Is there baseline data in the present levels to support the development of the measurable annual goals?

55

additional look f ors question 3
Additional Look-fors- Question # 3

Is assessment information compiled from a variety of formal and informal sources and types?

Is assessment data gathered over time?

Do present levels show that assessments are given or updated at least annually? (Question 4-F)

56

indicator13 checklist question 4
Indicator13 Checklist Question # 4
  • (File Review Question # 290)
  • An appropriate measurable postsecondary goal that covers education or training, employment, and, as needed, independent living.

Question # 4:

  • Is (are)there a measurable post-secondary goal or goals that covers education or training, employment, and, as needed, independent living?

20 USC 1414 614(d)(1)(A)(i)(VIII)(aa)

Review Present Levels AND Part III, Transition Grid

  • Refer to questions on next slide.

57

guiding questions question 4
Guiding Questions - Question # 4

Reminder: For any post-secondary area for which a goal was NOT selected, present levels must provide data and evidence to support that decision.

Do present education levels provide evidence that all 3 post-secondary goal areas have been considered?

Is there a post-secondary goal for Education/Training or a statement that the area was addressed by the IEP team?

Is there a post-secondary goal for Employment or a statement that the area was addressed by the IEP team?

Is there a post-secondary goal for Independent living or a statement that the area was addressed by the IEP team?

Will the goal(s) occur after the student graduates from school?

58

indicator 13 checklist question 4f
Indicator 13 Checklist Question # 4F

(File Review Question #291)

Evidence that the postsecondary goal or goals that cover education or training, employment, and, as needed, independent living are updated annually.

Note: This question involves looking at two consecutive IEPs. It will not be counted for Indicator 13 Checklist Pre and Post Reviews.

Question # 4 F:

  • Is (Are) the post-secondary goal(s) for education or training, employment, and as needed, independent living, updated annually?
  • (20 U.S.C. 1416(a)(3)(B))

Review Present Levels:

  • Look-fors: Evidence that assessments are given or updated at least annually

59

slide59

Step Three:

Establish Transition Team Partnerships

iep team participants for transition planning
IEP Team Participants for Transition Planning

Required Members

  • Student (Indicator 13 requirement!)
  • parents/guardians
  • local education agency representative (LEA)
  • general education teacher
  • special education teacher
  • career-technical education representative

(if being considered)

Other Members

  • SD transition coordinator
  • psychologist
  • guidance counselor
  • instructional support staff
  • job coach (if considered)
  • employer representative
  • community/agency representatives IF likely to provide or pay for services
  • relatives/friends/advocate
invitation to the iep meeting
Invitation to the IEP Meeting
  • Invite must reflect that student is invited
    • Use a separate Invite for student and parent
  • Invites must include agencies when it is appropriate for them to be invited
    • If agency is likely to provide or pay for services
    • With parent permission
agency involvement in transition
Agency Involvement in Transition
  • Agency involvement is based on individual needs
    • Younger students may not require agency unless have MH-MR supports or foster care, disability-related need (e.g., autism services, epilepsy).
    • OVR may be not be involved till 11th or 12th grade.
    • Agency involvement may vary by region.
  • Document agency invitation on IEP Invite!
agency involvement in transition1
Agency Involvement in Transition
  • Use Transition or Parent section of Present Levels to describe any special circumstances regarding agency participation, for example:
    • An agency is working with the family and will be invited
    • Student is too young to initiate services but agency involvement will be discussed at meeting
    • Parents refused agency participation
  • Parents are more likely to consent to agency involvement if they understand the reasons
  • Get to know your local agencies!
indicator 13 checklist question 1
Indicator 13 Checklist Question # 1

(File Review Question # 247)

  • Transition planning and services – Invitation to Student is evident, (age 14, or younger if determined appropriate).

Question # 1:

  • Is there evidence that the student was invited to the IEP meeting?

20 U.S.C. 1416(a)(3)(B)

Review IEP Invitation:

  • Is there an IEP Invitation Letter specifically addressed to the student?

65

i ndicator 13 checklist question 2
Indicator 13 Checklist Question # 2

(File Review Question # 246)

Transition planning and services – if appropriate, evidence that a representative of any participating agency was invited to the IEP meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student.

Question # 2:

  • For transition services that are likely to be provided or paid for by other agencies, is there evidence that representatives of the agency(ies) were invited with parent consent to the IEP meeting?§300.321(b)(3)

Review IEP Invitation

  • Refer to questions on next slide.

66

guiding questions question 2
Guiding Questions - Question # 2
  • Does the IEP (Present Levels) include information regarding agency involvement?
  • Were representatives from other agencies invited to the IEP meeting with parental consent? If YES, skip the remaining items in this section and record the summary rating.

If agencies were NOT invited…

    • Was it too early to determine that outside agency involvement was needed?
    • Was it unlikely that an outside agency would be providing or paying for services?
    • Did parents refuse to consent to inviting outside agency personnel?
slide67

Step Four:

Design a Transition Plan that includes:

Courses of Study and

Services/Activities

Section III of the IEP

“The Transition Grid”

what are courses of study
What are Courses of Study?

Part of the “coordinated set of activities” that help student move from high school to identified post-secondary goals

Support academic and functional achievement

Should promote graduation by meeting district standards

Include “Programs of Study” at Career Tech Centers, whether Exploratory or Laboratory program

Courses should be listed by course name- not “functional curriculum” or “college prep”

Course of Study must reflect current year’s courses.

what are transition services activities
What are Transition Services / Activities?
  • Action steps that support the student’s movement towards post-secondary goal areas
  • Slated to occur during current IEP
  • Each post-secondary goal area must have:
    • At least one SERVICE- Measurable Annual Goal to address skill deficit (e.g., reading, writing, behavior, organization, etc.)
    • At least one ACTIVITY- other activities that help the student reach his/her goal (next slide)
  • Put all together from 1st year to final year of transition planning = coordinated set of activities
slide73

Provided to help student achieve post-secondary goals,BUT DON’T NEED MEASURABLE ANNUAL GOALS

  • Visit a college or job fair
  • Complete a virtual tour
  • Complete career portfolio
  • Job shadow 4 hours per 9 wks.
  • Meet with guidance counselor to review graduation plan
  • Senior project
  • Group or individual meeting with OVR counselor
  • Support for voter registration

Example Services…

Example Activities…

…DO NOT NEED A MEASURABLE ANNUAL GOAL

Attend college fair

Complete a virtual tour

Explore employment options

Compile list of pros & cons of working right after HS

Meet with guidance counselor to determine schedule

Group meeting with OVR counselor

Job shadow

…ADDRESS SKILL DEFICITS & LEAD TO MEASURABLE ANNUAL GOAL & PROGRESS MONITORING

  • Build vocabulary skills
  • Writing conventions
  • Learn to board a bus
  • Comprehend figurative language
  • Initiate peer interaction
  • Improve skillswith budgeting, time management , algebraic equations, etc.
  • Follow three-step directions
  • Self advocacy skills
don t forget
Don’t Forget….

For each postsecondary goal….

    • Post-secondary Education
    • Employment
    • Independent Living
  • There must be at least one Measurable Annual Goal referenced in the Transition Grid.
  • Conversely, each Measurable Annual Goal should be referenced in the Grid.
indicator13 checklist question 5
Indicator13 Checklist Question # 5
  • File Review Question # 292 a
  • Transition services include courses of study that will reasonably enable the student to meet his or her postsecondary goals.

Question # 5:

  • Do the transition services include courses ofstudy that focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child to facilitate their movement from school to post-school?§300.320(b)(2)

Review Part III of IEP Transition Grid

  • Refer to questions on next slide.

77

guiding questions question 5
Guiding Questions- Question # 5

Are the courses listed by name? (not just “math” or “Life Skills” or “college prep”)

Do the courses listed align with the student’s identified post-school goal(s)?

If the student’s schedule has changed for any reason has the IEP been updated to reflect these changes to courses? (IEP needs to reflect current courses)

78

indicator 13 checklist question 6
Indicator 13 Checklist Question # 6
  • File Review Questions:
  • 292 b Transition services in the IEP that will reasonably enable the student to meet his or her postsecondary goals.
  • 292.Location, Frequency, Projected Beginning Date, Anticipated Duration, and Person(s) /Agency Responsible for Activity/Service

Question # 6:

  • Are there transition services in the IEP that focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child to facilitate their movement from school to post-school?

20 USC 1401 602(34)(A)

Review Part III of IEP, Transition Grid

  • Refer to questions on next slide.

79

guiding questions question 6
Guiding Questions- Question # 6

For each targeted postsecondary goal area, is the box at the top of the grid section checked “Yes” to indicate that there is one or more measurable annual goal(s) related to that postsecondary goal?

For each targeted postsecondary goal area, does the transition grid contain a reference to one or more measurable annual goal(s) [service(s)]addressing a skill need?

Are all measurable annual goals referenced as services in the Transition Grid?

80

guiding questions cont question 6
Guiding Questions (cont.)- Question # 6

For each targeted postsecondary goal area, does the transition grid contain at least one activity to help a student reach that goal, (e.g., college or employment visit or fair, meeting with an agency representative, job shadowing, resume preparation, etc.)?

Based on data in the Present Level Section, if a postsecondary goal area is not targeted, is the related grid section left blank?

81

slide81

Step Five:

Develop

Measurable Annual Goals that address skill deficits and lead to post-secondary goals

measurable annual goal mag
Measurable Annual Goal (MAG)

For students age 14-21, every measurable annual goal (MAG) and short term objective (STO) supports the student’s post- secondary goals.

measurable annual goals mag
Measurable Annual Goals (MAG)
    • Build skills (identified in Needs)
    • Prioritized: 3-5 goals for most
    • Communicate expectations-projects student performance at the end of one year of instruction
    • Begin from baseline of skill (present levels)
    • Contain measurable, countable data
  • Are written to include progress monitoring
measurable annual goals and objectives
Measurable Annual Goals and Objectives

What they are NOT

NOT curriculum

NOT for subject areas

NOT grade averages or passing a course

NOT only for students instructed in special education classes

NOT activities such as visiting a college fair or job shadowing

NOT specified as “transition goals”

NOT the same as post-secondary goals

examples of skills that might be needed for secondary students
Examples of SKILLS that might be needed for Secondary Students

Academic Skills

Organizational skills

Social Skills

Time Management Skills

Dexterity Skills

Communication Skills

Self Help Skills

Travel Skills

Mobility Skills

Workplace Values

Self Determination and Self Advocacy Skills

measurable annual goals
Measurable Annual Goals

Four required parts:

  • Condition
  • Student’s Name
  • Clearly Defined Behavior
  • Performance Criteria

Adapted from Strategies for Writing Better Goals and Short Term Objectives or Benchmarks by Benjamin Lignugaris/Kraft Nancy Marchand-Martella and Ronald Martella Sept/Oct 2001 Teaching Exceptional Children

slide92

Step Six:

Monitor Progress and Adjust Instruction Based on Data

indicator 13 checklist question 7
Indicator 13 Checklist Question # 7

File Review Question # 292 c

  • Annual goals are related to the student’s transition services

Question # 7:

  • Is (are) there measurable annual IEP goal(s) that will reasonably enable the child to meet the postsecondary goal(s)? )Indicator 13 language

Review: Part V of IEP, Measurable Annual Goals

  • Refer to questions on next slide.

96

guiding questions question 7
Guiding Questions - Question # 7

Does each annual goal (and Short Term Objective) contain the following components?

  • A condition?
  • Student’s name?
  • Clearly defined behavior?
  • Performance criteria, including:
    • level of performance (how well?)
    • number of times needed to demonstrate mastery (how consistently?)
    • evaluation schedule (how often and by what method will the student be evaluated?)

97

guiding questions question 7 cont
Guiding Questions - Question # 7 (cont.)
  • Is there alignment between the Present Levels, list of Needs, the Transition Grid, and Measurable Annual Goals?

(Do all parts of the the IEP match, and make sense?)

indicator 13 iep checklist
Indicator 13 IEP Checklist

Summary Question

  • Does the IEP meet all requirements of Indicator 13?
    • If all Questions 1-7 are answered YES the IEP meets the requirements of Indicator 13.
    • If one or more questions are answered NO, the IEP does not meet requirements for Indicator 13.

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ensuring effective secondary programs and post secondary outcomes

Ensuring Effective Secondary Programs and Post-Secondary Outcomes:

Part III:

Using the

Indicator 13 IEP Review Checklist

your turn
Your Turn

List two new ideas you learned today:

the big picture guiding questions
The Big Picture: Guiding Questions

Ask yourself:

  • “What is it that we are actually doing to support this student?
  • Is it meaningful?
  • Will it really help the student to achieve his/her post-secondary goals?
contact information www pattan net
Rosemary Nilles

PaTTAN Pittsburgh

rnilles@pattan.net

412-826-6870

800-446-5607 ex. 6870

Michael Stoehr

PaTTAN Pittsburgh

mstoehr@pattan.net

412-826-6864

800-446-5607 ex. 6864

Contact Information www.pattan.net

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

Tom Corbett, Governor

Pennsylvania Department of Education

Ronald J. Tomalis, Secretary

Dr. Carolyn Dumaresq, Deputy Secretary

Office of Elementary and Secondary Education

John J. Tommasini, Director

Bureau of Special Education

Patricia Hozella, Assistant Director

Bureau of Special Education