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UNIT 3, Part 2 Loves and Losses

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  1. UNIT 3, Part 2 Loves and Losses Click the mouse button or press the space bar to continue

  2. Unit 3, Part 2 MAIN MENU Loves and Losses (pages 630–644) Click a selection title to go to the corresponding selection menu.

  3. SELECTION MENU Selection Menu (pages 630–633) Before You Read Reading the Selection After You Read

  4. BEFORE YOU READ Meet Rita Dove Click the picture to learn about the author.

  5. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poem The following poem is primarily about loss and the ways in which people react to loss. In this poem, the speaker’s view of death is different from that of his or her family members.

  6. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poem Before you read the poem, think about the following questions: • Have you ever disagreed with family members about an important topic? • How did you deal with this difference in opinion?

  7. BEFORE YOU READ Building Background A parlor is a formal room in a home, used primarily for conversation or the reception of guests.

  8. BEFORE YOU READ Building Background The speaker of the poem listens to her transistor radio. Transistor radios were popular in the 1950s and 1960s. These lightweight radios ran on batteries and were small enough to hold in the hand or fit in a pocket. Teenagers plugged an earphone in one ear and tuned in to their favorite music.

  9. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading Loves and Losses As you read this poem, ask yourself what lessons the speaker of the poem learned from his or her grandmother’s life and death, and what message the poet conveys through her poem.

  10. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading Imagery Imagery is descriptive language that appeals to one or more of the five senses: sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. This use of sensory detail helps create an emotional response in the reader.

  11. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading Imagery As you read “Parlor,” pay close attention to Dove’s imagery. Concentrating on it will help you grasp and retain the meaning as well as enhance your experience of the poem.

  12. BEFORE YOU READ Interpreting Imagery Writers use imagery to paint a picture with words in a way that helps the reader respond emotionally to what the writer has written. When you interpret imagery, you form a picture in your mind’s eye of the images the writer has painted with words. While reading “Parlor,” notice how the imagery that Dove uses helps you make sense of the poem.

  13. BEFORE YOU READ Interpreting Imagery Reading Tip: Summarizing Try visualizing the setting that Dove has created in the poem by summarizing each stanza using your own words and by drawing on the images created in your mind’s eye. To help develop your thoughts use a graphic organizer like the one on the next slide for each stanza.

  14. BEFORE YOU READ Interpreting Imagery

  15. BEFORE YOU READ chinan. fine, glossy pottery used for tableware (p. 632) I washed and dried the china after we ate dinner. aglowadj. glowing (p. 632) The house was so aglow with lights, she could see into every room. Click a vocabulary term to listen to the definition.

  16. READING THE SELECTION Loves and Losses Keep the following questions in mind as you read. What do the characters in the poem love? What have they lost? Answer:The speaker loves her grandmother and her transistor radio. Her grandmother loves her possessions and her family, but she keeps both at a distance. The mother loves life. The speaker and her mother have lost the grandmother.

  17. READING THE SELECTION Loves and Losses Read the text highlighted in tan on page 632. What does this statement tell you about the beliefs of the speaker’s grandmother with regard to love and loss?

  18. READING THE SELECTION Answer:Answers will vary. It may show that the grandmother takes comfort in things she treasures, or she knew that eventually she would have to leave, so it was better not to become too close to things.

  19. READING THE SELECTION Literary Element Imagery To which sense does Dove appeal most in this poem? Answer:Hearing.

  20. READING THE SELECTION Literary Element Imagery Which image seems most vivid to you? Answer:Images might include reminders of loved ones or of familiar places.

  21. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Respond • The speaker seems to think that it’s best to keep the things you love at a distance. Do you agree? Why or why not? Answer:You may prefer to keep things close to protect you, others to keep them in the safest place to prevent them from being broken.

  22. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret • (a) What does the image of “tired eyes of saints / aglow on velvet” remind you of? (b) What can you infer about where the poem takes place based on this imagery? Answer:(a) Some may say the things in the parlor are old and tired, but revered. (b) In Grandma’s house

  23. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret • (a) What do the speaker’s mother and grandmother disagree about? (b) How would you characterize the speaker’s grandmother? Be specific.

  24. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret Answer:(a) How to live one’s life, what things are important (b) Students may say wise, because she speaks of “peace” not being found in material things and “strength” in silence.

  25. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret • (a) How do you interpret the speaker’s mother saying “things harden with age”? (b) What does the mother’s view say about her?

  26. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret Answer:(a) That life simply gets more difficult, or that as people age they become cynical and stubborn (b) That she is preoccupied with her own aging and sense of mortality.

  27. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate • (a) The speaker states that he or she wishes for “. . . a room you couldn’t enter, except in your mind.” What do you think the speaker means? (b) Why do you think he or she wishes for this?

  28. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate Answer:(a) That a private place, like a “room you couldn’t enter” would be the safest place to keep things you love. (b) The speaker misses the grandmother.

  29. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate • (a) How does Dove establish setting in this poem? (b) Do you think that her establishment of setting is effective?

  30. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate Answer:(a) “China gleam,” “velvet,” and things that “harden with age” lend themselves to the image an old parlor room. (b) The setting, although isolated and alone, is not devoid of a deeper identity, much like the grandmother.

  31. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate • Where does the ending of the poem take place? What clues lead you to think that this is the setting? Answer:(a) Perhaps in the dining room, near the parlor (b) Because she “slipped off to sneak a peek” at the place that she previously had “passed through”

  32. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Connect Loves and Losses • What does the speaker come to realize about loves and losses at the end of the poem? How does he or she come to realize this? Answer:She came to understand why Grandma had kept everything she loved at a distance.

  33. AFTER YOU READ Imagery Many writers use imagery to evoke an emotional response from their readers. Imagery often appeals to one or more of the five senses: sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell.

  34. AFTER YOU READ Imagery • How does the imagery in the poem appeal to your senses? Answer:Answers will vary. You should support your answer with examples.

  35. AFTER YOU READ Imagery • Is Dove’s use of imagery effective in “Parlor”? Explain. Answer: Answers will vary. Specific terms should be used in support of opinions.

  36. AFTER YOU READ Listening and Speaking With a partner, reread “Parlor” paying particular attention to stanzas three and five. Choose one person to be the mother and the other to be the grandmother. After rereading the poem, role-play a conversation between the two women. Center the discussion on whether things were made to be used or to be left alone.

  37. AFTER YOU READ Interpreting Imagery Sometimes a poem has layers of meaning. For example, although this poem is about an event in the life of a child, the meaning of the poem is much deeper. When you interpret imagery, you determine the deeper meaning of images.

  38. AFTER YOU READ Interpreting Imagery • What main message do you think the poet is trying to convey in “Parlor”? Answer:That some people are surrounded by things and people but don’t get near physically or emotionally.

  39. AFTER YOU READ Interpreting Imagery • How does the imagery support the meaning of the poem? Answer:Terms such as “silence,” “tired,” “unsaid,” “quiet,” and “distant” evoke feelings of sadness and possibly death

  40. AFTER YOU READ Practice Practice with Context CluesUse context clues to choose the correct definitions for the boldfaced vocabulary words.

  41. AFTER YOU READ Practice • They received a set of china for their wedding, and they used it every night for dinner. • drapes • towels • tableware

  42. AFTER YOU READ Practice • The lights on the computer were aglow, so she knew is was on. • dark • lit • beeping

  43. SELECTION MENU Selection Menu (pages 634–637) Before You Read Reading the Selection After You Read

  44. BEFORE YOU READ Meet Sherman Alexie Click the picture to learn about the author.

  45. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poem In the following poem, Alexie addresses the challenges of growing up, dealing with the loss of a parent, and claiming our places as adults in society.

  46. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poem Before you read the poem, think about the following questions: • How do your parents or other family members link you to the past? • How connected do you feel to other people in your community?

  47. BEFORE YOU READ Building Background Alexie uses his work to explore the challenges that American Indians face when trying to reconcile the need to contribute to modern society with the desire to honor historic traditions. As Alexie himself once said, “I . . . know that I live a happier, more adventurous life, by crossing borders. Of course, the crossings are always painful, as well.”