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Employment Services for the Future Conference University of Melbourne 2013 Findings from the Centre for Work and Learning, Yarra demonstration project. Michael Horn Strategic Development Manager, Research & Policy Brotherhood of St Laurence 7 February 2013. About the project.

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Employment Services for the Future Conference University of Melbourne 2013Findings from the Centre for Work and Learning, Yarra demonstration project

Michael Horn

Strategic Development Manager, Research & Policy

Brotherhood of St Laurence

7 February 2013

slide2

About the project

The Centre was jointly funded by DEEWR’s Innovation Fund and the

Brotherhood - $3.2 million over three years

Multi-level collaboration: DEEWR; Office of Housing; City of Yarra; JSAs

Project duration: July 2009 to June 2012

Aim: to increase work & learning outcomes for public housing tenants in the local neighbourhood through an integrated approach with a line of sight to employment

centre for work learning yarra business case 2009
Centre for Work & Learning Yarra – Business case 2009
  • One third of Victoria’s high rise public housing is in inner City of Yarra
  • Approx 5,000 public housing dwellings (48% high rise flats)
  • Only 14% of public housing tenants in Yarra in paid work
  • Analysis of employment assistance (Job Network):
    • failing highly disadvantaged job seekers (DEEWR outcomes data & Neighbourhood Renewal survey data)
    • frustrating local employers through poor preparation and matching of job seekers to job vacancies

Source: BSL Innovation Fund Project Proposal 2009

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How the Centre differed from the JSA model

JSA Service Model Centre for Work and Learning

Compliance driven Voluntary and free (open door)

Client can be breached Trusted relationship

Case Managers review clients Personalised support

Client training driven by $$ BSL training designed to suit job seeker

Large caseloads Lower client to advisor ratio

Minimal client engagementOutreach to disengaged tenants

Employers not sure of client Proactive employer engagement

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A customised employment service

Discussion group for newcomers to Australia

English conversation circle

Job seeker is linked to Centre services specifically designed to support a positive outcome

Community mentor

Interview skills training

Job club

Workplace culture training

Computer training

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Profile of Centre clients

55% male

mean age of 33 years: 24% < 25 years; 53% 25-40 yrs; 23% >40 yrs

65% living in public housing; 25% private rental

half living in the City of Yarra

98% born outside Australia (74% Africa; 22% Asia)

35% had poor/very poor spoken English (41% written English)

46% on Newstart/YA; 17% Parenting Payment; 4% on DSP

21% not on income support

engagement with job services australia
Engagement with Job Services Australia

Note: 21% of clients not on income support payments

key findings employment outcomes
Key findings: employment outcomes
  • Job placement rate: 42%
  • Employment outcome (at 13 weeks): 31%
  • Half (52%) obtained work in open labour market; 29% brokered through BSL; 19% traineeships via BSL’s GTO
  • 53% of those in paid jobs were casual; 40% contract; 7% permanent
  • Public housing residents: 41% job placement rate and 27% employment outcome rate

This outcome rate compared well with national JSA Stream 3 & 4 jobseekers from CALD backgrounds (margin of 3 percentage points)

key findings service innovation learnings
Key findings: service innovation learnings
  • The majority want to obtain paid work
  • Dissatisfaction exists with mainstream JSA services
  • Emerging evidence of training churn and credentialism
  • More intensive support (at least 2 sessions per month) associated with employment outcomes (1:60 ratio)
  • Work & Learning Advisors play a vital role in modeling workplace behaviour through a trusting relationship
  • Local employer engagement critical (both open employment & social enterprises) to provide work opportunities matched to skills
  • Post placement follow-up important (clients & employer support)
  • Proactive outreach strategies important to engage ‘hard to reach’ groups on public housing estates
implications for active labour market policy
Implications for active labour market policy
  • Review assessment procedures to ensure all barriers to work are considered in allocating disadvantaged jobseekers to JSA Streams
  • Stronger measures to ensure JSA collaboration with local services (third party providers)
  • Invest in ‘wraparound’ approaches, including ‘off-benefit’ funding models for ILMs
  • Strengthen workforce diversity measures and social procurement strategies to support job pathways
  • Investigate the prevalence of training churn experienced by disadvantaged job seekers
  • Consider labour market initiatives to support job retention and advancement for entry level workers
implications for social housing policy
Implications for social housing policy
  • Provision of affordable housing with security of tenure is insufficient to enable social and economic participation: 61% of public housing tenants experience social exclusion *
  • Gap in unemployment rates between public housing areas and surrounding neighbourhoods can be reduced
  • Silo-centric programs fail to address multi-dimensional challenges faced by many tenants – better integrated approaches at local level do work
  • Disincentives to economic participation by working age tenants (& applicants) must be addressed – coherent policies across housing, income support and employment assistance required to ‘make work pay’

* BSL – Melbourne Institute Social Exclusion Monitor 2012

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Thank you

References:

Azpitarte F 2012, Social Exclusion Monitor Bulletin, April, Brotherhood of St Laurence and the Melbourne Institute.

Brotherhood of St Laurence 2012, Centre for Work & Learning Yarra: Evaluation Report, Fitzroy, Victoria.

For more information on the Brotherhood of St Laurence and the work of our Research & Policy Centre: please visit

www.bsl.org.au