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The Connie Belin & Jacqueline N. Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development The University of Iowa College of Education. The JAVITS Iowa Twice Exceptional Project :. Profiles of Iowa’s Twice-Exceptional Learners. Susan G. Assouline, Ph.D.

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the javits iowa twice exceptional project

The Connie Belin & Jacqueline N. Blank International Center

for Gifted Education and Talent Development

The University of Iowa College of Education

The JAVITS Iowa Twice Exceptional Project:

Profiles of Iowa’s Twice-Exceptional Learners

Susan G. Assouline, Ph.D.

Professor, Associate Director

Megan Foley Nicpon, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Supervisor of Psychological Services

NurturingPotentialInspiringExcellence

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

What is the Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project?

Nurturing Potential Inspiring Excellence

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Javits Twice Exceptional Project

Background:

  • 2005 Federally funded joint effort of the Iowa DOE and the Belin-Blank Center
  • PI: Susan Assouline; PM: Megan Foley Nicpon

Purpose:

  • Examine the unique issues related to assessing the learning needs of twice-exceptional (2XE) students

Nurturing Potential Inspiring Excellence

the belin blank center twice exceptional research 2002 2008
The Belin-Blank Center Twice-Exceptional Research (2002-2008)
  • Three-year Javits-funded project to investigate best practices (2005-2008)
    • Built on the foundation of research from 2002-2005
  • Javits Project team:
    • Iowa DOE
      • Rosanne Malek and Jim Reese
    • Belin-Blank Center
      • Susan Assouline, Megan Foley Nicpon, Claire Whiteman, Nicholas Colangelo, Greg Feldmann, Nancy Whetstine
the grant
The Grant
  • The main goal is to address the Javits “Absolute Priority” to carry out a coordinated program of scientifically based research to build and enhance the ability of elementary and secondary schools to meet the special educational needs of gifted and talented students.
  • Response to the first time fact that children who are gifted and talented are recognized in federal legislation concerned with disabilities
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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Twice-Exceptional Project Goals:

  • Increase awareness of 2XE student characteristics.
  • Gain knowledge of best practices for comprehensively evaluating 2XE students.
  • Provide appropriate interventions for 2XE students.
  • Increase understanding of unique learning needs.
  • Change behavior by applying new knowledge, attitudes, awareness, and skills when working with 2XE students.

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Definitions of twice-exceptional

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

“A student is considered twice-exceptional when he or she is identified as gifted/talented in one or more areas while also possessing a learning, emotional, physical, sensory, and/or developmental disability” (from Assouline, Foley Nicpon, & Huber, 2006)

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

“It is difficult to describe the ‘typical’ twice-exceptional student because of the variability demonstrated among them. The one common characteristic of this group, however, is that they simultaneously possess attributes of giftedness as well as learning, physical, social/emotional or behavioral deficits” (The Twice-Exceptional Dilemma, National Education Association)

Nurturing Potential Inspiring Excellence

twice exceptionality

Advocacy

Diagnosis

Intervention

Twice- Exceptionality
  • Relative to
  • Disability
  • Giftedness
  • Grant
twice exceptional 2x
Twice Exceptional (2X)
  • Two separate (and not equal) federal legislative actions form the foundation to understanding 2X
    • 1972 Marland Report – predominant basis for identification and programming of gifted and talented in 5 broad areas (definition, but no mandate)
    • 1975 PL-94 142 (renamed IDEA); a mandate for identification and provision of services for students with disabilities
special education
Special Education
  • 1975 Federal Legislation
  • Evolution of the categories (currently 13) as understanding increased
  • Dramatic increases in numbers
    • From 1991 to 2000 an increase of 28.4% in the number of students ages 6 to 21 receiving services (approximately 10% of the K-12 population)
    • In 1976, only ¼ of students were considered LD, but by 1990, LD represented ½ and LD has maintained its first-place rank
special education1

Number of students (ages 6 – 21) served by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 2001 by disability category,

Adapted from the U.S. Department of Education (2005); Number of students (ages 6 – 21)

served under IDEA in 2001 (Sattler, 2008).

________________________________________________________________________

Disability # of children %IDEA total % of US student

Population (Ages 6-21)

________________________________________________________________________

Specific learning 2,886,679 49.2 6.0

disabilities**

Speech or

language impairments 1,091,306 18.6 2.3

Mental retardation 604,325 10.3 1.2

Emotional disturbance 475,246 8.1 1.0

Multiple disabilities 129,079 2.2 0.3

Hearing impairments 70,407 1.2 0.1

Orthopedic impairments 76,274 1.3 0.2

Other health impairments 340,299 5.8 0.7

Visual impairments 23,469 0.4 0.0

Autism 99,743 1.7 0.2

Deaf-blindness --- 0.0 0.0

Traumatic brain injury 23,469 0.4 0.0

Developmental Delay 46,938 0.8 0.1

All disabilities 5,867,234 100.0 12.1

Special Education
idea 2004
IDEA 2004

Gifted and Talented Students with a disability are recognized as one of the groups of students whose needs have priority in US DOE grants to guide research, personnel preparation, and technical assistance the Javits Twice-Exceptional Research Grant

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Types of Twice-Exceptionality

  • GT with physical disabilities
  • GT with sensory disabilities
  • GT with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
  • GT with emotional and/or behavioral disorders
  • GT with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • GT with specific learning disabilities (SLD)

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

What are some challenges facing 2xe students?

  • Gifts masking disability
  • Disability masking gifts
  • No identification

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Project emphasis

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Main focus of our project:

  • Academically gifted students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • Academically gifted

students with specific

learning disabilities (SLD)

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initial focus
Initial Focus
  • Gifted and talented students who have learning difficulties or social impairments.  Students – who we are referring to as twice-exceptional -- face a double-risk in the educational environment
  • (1) because of their strong academic potential, their disability often is not recognized until they spend enough time in the system “waiting to fail”;
  • (2) meanwhile, because they “fail to flourish” their strong academic potential is not realized.
  • The double impact of these systemic flaws results in a very vulnerable group of twice-exceptional learners with unique issues that will be addressed in our project.
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Students with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

Gifted Students

The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Why focus on ASD?

  • Diagnosis of ASD has grown tremendously in the past 10 years
  • Limited to no research at present with gifted students

Gifted/ASD students

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Why focus on SLD?

  • It represents more than 50% of students in the 13 diagnostic categories. It is the one category that has grown the most.
  • The changes in IDEA are very much reflected in the SLD issues.
  • Increased use of curriculum-based assessment (CBA) and response to intervention (RTI) strategies greatly affect gifted/LD

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

What is known about twice-exceptional students in schools?

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Results from the Needs Assessment

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needs assessment results
Needs Assessment Results
  • The Needs Assessment was designed to be brief. The information was fairly general:
  • Basic demographics
  • Familiarity with Special Education, G/T, and Twice-Exceptional
  • Confidence in making an appropriate referral
  • Which professional should be the primary provider of support
basic demographics
Basic Demographics

Primary Role

Gifted Education Specialist: 77 (38%)

School Psychologist: 47 (23%)

Classroom Teacher: 36 (18%)

*******

Other (librarian, media specialist) 24(12%)

Special Ed Teacher 8(4%)

School Administrator 7 (3%)

School Counselor 6 (3%)

confidence in referral process for twice exceptional students
Confidence in Referral Process for Twice-Exceptional Students
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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

What does a twice-exceptional child look like?

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Cognitive, academic and adaptive functioning profiles: GT/ASD

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

ASD Assessment Process

  • Cognition (SB5; WISC-IV; WAIS-III)
  • Achievement (WIAT-II; WJIII)
  • Motor (VMI 5th Edition; Grooved Pegboard Test)
  • Psychosocial functioning [Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd Edition (BASC-2) Self Report, Parent, and Teacher Rating Scales]
  • Self Concept (Piers-Harris Self Concept Scale – 2)
  • ASD diagnosis (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule ADOS; Autism Diagnostic Interview – Revised; ADI-R)
  • Adaptive behavior (Vineland-2)

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

ASD Assessments

77 Comprehensive assessments completed

  • 48 ASD assessments
    • 6 had no diagnosis
    • 5 did not meet cognitive ability criteria
  • 37 total GT/ASD (1+ IQ score in Superior range or above; ASD diagnosis*)
    • 17 (46%) Asperger’s Disorder
    • 13 (35%) Autistic Disorder
    • 7 (19%) Pervasive Developmental Disorder

*Diagnosis based on ADOS/ADI-R results and DSM-IV criteria

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

ASD Demographics

31 (84%) boys / 6 (16%) girls

20 ES / 10 MS / 7 HS

34 white / 2 Latino / 1 Biracial

  • 21 (57%) Prescribed psychotropics
  • 23 (62%) Previously evaluated
  • 4 (11%) Whole grade accelerated
  • 14 (38%) Subject accelerated
  • 25 (68%) GT participants
  • 8 (22%) SE participants

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

ASD Profile Analysis – Ability

  • Cognitive Composite from 104 – 160 (m = 129; 97th percentile)
    • (31 of 37 in Superior range or above; 6 in PG range)
  • Verbal Composite from 91 – 155 (m = 127; 96th percentile)
    • (49% Very Superior verbal abilities; 11 in PG range)
  • Nonverbal Composite from 86 – 149 (m = 123; 94th percentile)
  • Working Memory from 86 – 141 (m = 112; 79th percentile)
  • Processing Speed from 68 – 126 (m = 96; 39th percentile)
    • 43% Low Average or below

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Verbal/Nonverbal Discrepancy Analysis

verbal> nonverbal no split nonverbal > verbal

12 (33%) 16 (43%) 9 (24%)

15 – 54 points 17 – 37 points

(1 – 3.75 SDs) (1 – 2.5 SDs)

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

ASD Profile Analysis – Motor

  • Mean performance in Average range
  • 46% exhibited motor difficulties
  • 23% exhibited advanced motor skills

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

ASD Profile Analysis – Achievement

  • Sight word reading > reading speed > comprehension
    • Means from High Average to Superior
  • Math reasoning > calculation > math speed
    • Means from Average to Superior range

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

ASD Profile Analysis – Achievement

  • Spelling > written expression > writing fluency
    • Means from Average to Superior range
  • Expressive > receptive language
    • Means from Average to High Average range
    • Delayed > immediate

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Profile Analysis – Adaptive Behavior

  • Communication Domain

overall in Average range (93; 32nd percentile)

written > expressive > receptive

  • Daily Living Skills Domain

overall in the Low Average/Average range (89; 23rd percentile)

community > personal = domestic

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Profile Analysis – Adaptive Behavior

  • Socialization Domain
    • overall in Borderline range (74; 4th percentile)
    • Mildly deficient range = 9 (25%)
    • Borderline range = 15 (42%)
    • Low Average range =11 (31%)
  • 1 student in the Average range

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

What does all this mean?

1. Our sample of gifted students with ASD exhibited extremely large discrepancies in their cognitive, academic, and adaptive functioning profiles

2. These discrepancies are confusing to the child/adolescent as well as to those who work and live with him/her (e.g., why are some things so easy and others so hard?)

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

What does all this mean?

3. Verbal and nonverbal reasoning skills are typically much stronger than are working memory and processing speed skills

4. These cognitive discrepancies can, and often do, affect academic functioning

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Cognitive, academic and adaptive functioning profiles: GT/SLD

Nurturing Potential Inspiring Excellence

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

SLD Assessment Process

  • Cognition (SB5; WISC-IV; WAIS-III)
  • Achievement – two measures in area of difficulty (WIAT-II; WJIII)
  • Psychosocial functioning [Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd Edition (BASC-2) Self Report, Parent, and Teacher Rating Scales]
  • Self concept (Piers-Harris Self Concept Scale – 2)
  • Motor WL only (VMI 5th Edition; Grooved Pegboard Test)

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

SLD Assessments

77 Comprehensive assessments completed

  • 29 SLD assessments
    • 6 had no diagnosis
    • 6 did not meet cognitive ability criteria
  • 17 total GT/SLD (1+ IQ score in Superior range or above; SLD diagnosis)
    • 14 Disorder of Written Expression (5 w/ co-occurring Reading DO)
    • 1 Reading Disorder (only)
    • 1 Math Disorder (only)
    • 1 SLD NOS

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

SLD Demographics

14 (82%) boys / 3 (18%) girls

6 ES / 7 MS / 4 HS

17 white

  • 3 (18%) Prescribed psychotropics
  • 7 (41%) Previously evaluated
  • 0 Whole grade accelerated
  • 2 (12%) Subject accelerated
  • 9 (53%) GT participants
  • 1 (6%) SE participants

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

What does a 2e child look like?

SLD Profile Analysis – Ability

  • Cognitive Composite from 107 – 148 (m = 125; 95th percentile)
    • (12 in Superior range or above; 3 in PG range)
  • Verbal Composite from 105 – 150 (m = 128; 97th percentile)
    • (14 in Superior range or above; 3 in PG range)
  • Nonverbal Composite from 84 – 138 (m = 117; 87th percentile)
  • Working Memory from 88 – 123 (m = 104; 61st percentile)
  • Processing Speed from 68 – 114 (m = 95 37th percentile)

Nurturing Potential Inspiring Excellence

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Verbal/Nonverbal Discrepancy Analysis:

verbal> nonverbal no split nonverbal > verbal

7 (41%) 10 (59%) 0 (0%)

15 – 46 points

(1 – 3.5 SDs)

Nurturing Potential Inspiring Excellence

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

SLD Profile Analysis – Achievement

  • Sight word reading = comprehension = reading speed
    • All means in the Average range
  • Math reasoning = calculation > math speed
    • Means in Average to High Average range
  • Expressive > receptive language

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

SLD Profile – Written Language

  • WJIII: written expression > spelling > writing fluency
    • All in Average range
  • WIAT: overall lower scores than WJIII spelling = written expression
    • (Mean = 95 (37th percentile) and 93 (32nd percentile, respectfully)
    • Fine motor skills lower end of Average range (mean = 92)

Nurturing Potential Inspiring Excellence

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

What does all this mean?

  • Among our sample, written language the area where students have the most difficulty.
  • Our sample of gifted students with SLD were not typically accelerated
  • Less discrepancy in the SLD cognitive profiles than in the ASD cognitive profiles, but a similar pattern
  • Perform “average” but below intra-individual expectations
  • These students may get missed if a comprehensive evaluation is not completed

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Javits Twice-Exceptional Project

What are

some of the social

and emotional

concerns of twice-

exceptional students?

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Javits Twice-Exceptional Project

Concerns of gifted students with ASD

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

ASD Psychosocial Patterns – Parent Report

  • 84% reported global adaptive skill difficulties
    • 81% reported difficulties adapting to change
    • 62% reported social skills difficulties
    • Only one parent reported concerns with functional communication
  • 87% reported overall emotional/behavioral difficulties
    • 65% reported attention symptoms
    • 86% reported atypicality symptoms
    • 86% reported withdrawal symptoms

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

ASD Psychosocial Patterns –

Teacher Report

  • 68% reported overall emotional/behavioral problems
  • 81% reported atypicality symptoms
  • 77% reported withdrawal symptoms

*********No teacher reported observing

learning problems********

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

ASD Psychosocial Patterns – Self Report

  • Only 4 students reported global emotional & behavioral concerns
    • 30% reported anxiety symptoms
    • 24% reported atypicality symptoms
  • 91% did not report interpersonal concerns
  • 89% felt self-reliant
  • 82% had Average or above self-esteem scores

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

ASD Self-Esteem Patterns

  • 83% reported global Average to High self-self-esteem
    • All had Average or above intellectual self-esteem
    • 52% reported feeling unpopular with peers

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

What does all this mean?

  • In our group of students, similar scales were elevated on parent and teacher report measures, but parents’ reports are more significant
  • Teachers may not necessarily observe educational problems in 2e (GT/ASD)
  • In our group of students, self-perceptions were generally positive and often were not consistent with parent/teacher perceptions

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The Javits Twice-Exceptional Project

Concerns of gifted students with SLD

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

SLD Psychosocial Patterns – Parent Report

  • 71% reported global adaptive skill difficulties
  • One parent reported overall internalizing problems
    • 59% reported withdrawal symptoms
  • 47% reported global externalizing problems
    • 52% reported hyperactivity symptoms

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

SLD Psychosocial Patterns –

Teacher Report

  • 33% reported overall emotional/behavioral difficulties
  • 3 reported overall externalizing symptoms
    • 40% report hyperactivity
  • 3 reported overall internalizing problems
    • 33% reported withdrawal
  • 47% reported observing learning problems

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

SLD Psychosocial Patterns – Self Report

  • Only 3 students reported global emotional/behavioral concerns
  • 3 reported internalizing problems
  • 82% had a positive impression of school
  • 61% had a positive impression of teachers
  • 82% felt self-reliant
  • 82% had Average + self-esteem scores

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

SLD Self-Esteem Patterns – Self Report

  • 82% reported global Average to High self-self-esteem
    • 82% Average or above intellectual self-esteem
    • 65% reported feeling popular with peers

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

What does all this mean?

  • While psychosocial concerns exist, they are generally mild as a group, particularly in comparison to 2e with ASD
  • Teachers are more likely to observe educational problems in 2e with LD than 2e with ASD
  • In our group of students, not many reported emotional or behavioral difficulties

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

How is a twice-exceptional child different from a gifted child?

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Case study comparison: a profoundly gifted girl with ASD and a profoundly gifted girl without ASD

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

  • Carrie
  • Evaluation completed at ages 11 - 14
  • Accelerated from 6th to 8th grade
  • Developmental milestones on time or early (reading at 30 months)
  • Disorganized, forgetful, difficulty w/ daily activities, & uninterested in peer relationships
  • Bx Obs: cooperative, talkative, needed instructions repeated; questioned purpose of assessment tasks
  • Diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome

Hannah

  • Evaluation completed at age 11
  • Not accelerated but in GT
  • Developmental milestones within normal limits
  • Described as shy w/social difficulties; social skills counseling
  • Bx Obs: cooperative, attentive, hard-working; shy
  • No diagnosis

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Summary of Results

  • Intellectually similar, Carrie lower Processing Speed
  • Academically similar, Carrie lower expressive language
  • Large differences in adaptive functioning (communication and socialization)
  • Psychosocial functioning variable (Carrie = elevated parent and teacher scores consistent with ASD)
  • ASD assessment clearly differentiated the two girls

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Conclusions

  • Comprehensive assessment crucial for appropriate diagnosis
  • ADOS/ADIR and Vineland-II most useful instruments for determining whether ASD is present
  • IQ and Achievement testing did not reliably differentiate the girls

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Case study: A gifted student with SLD

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

How can

educators help

twice-exceptional

students?

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

The Paradox of Giftedness and Autism: Packet of Information for Professionals

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Suggestions from PIP

  • Reading
    • Materials in area of interest
    • Diverse genres
    • Abstract vs. concrete
    • Comprehension over speed
    • Partner up
  • Math
    • New material at an individualized pace
    • Diversify topic areas

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Suggestions from PIP

  • Processing Speed
    • Allow time to respond in class
    • Write facts and deadlines on the board
    • Minimize timed activities
    • Quality over quantity
    • Encourage pre-planning
    • Reduce copying
    • Praise persistence
    • Make an outline / notes available

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Suggestions from PIP

  • Written Language
    • Offer an assortment of writing utensil options
    • Print or cursive
    • Share notes
    • Use graph paper
    • Assistive technology
    • Extra time on writing assignments
    • Tape record
    • Write about special interests
    • Content first and mechanics second (drafts and proof reading)

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Suggestions from PIP

  • Social Skills
    • Cultivate social awareness at every opportunity
    • Encouragement and recognition
    • Specific instructions
    • Specific opportunities
  • Communication Skills
    • Feedback about conversations
    • Monitor bullying behavior
    • Praise attempts at participation
    • Straightforward and direct communication

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Suggestions from PIP

  • Behavior
    • Remove student from source of stress
    • Safe place
    • Make options available for free time
    • Consult with professionals re. a behavior management plan
    • Use interests in a positive way
    • Post schedules
    • Provide warnings to change

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

The Paradox of Giftedness and Autism: Packet of Information for Families

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Suggestions from PIF

  • Disclosure of information to staff
  • Discussing the program
  • Taking a proactive approach
  • Planning for social activities
  • Avoiding potential behavioral problems

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

How should the student’s gifts be addressed?

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

  • Listen, listen, listen, and support
  • Highlight the child’s strengths and interests, and use this information to stimulate learning
  • Employ alternate (nontraditional) ways to demonstrate understanding
  • Ensure that GT participation is not contingent on good behavior

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

How should the student’s disability be addressed?

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

  • Flexibility, flexibility, flexibility, and support
  • Be actively involved in IEP or 504 planning
  • Communicate with the child and his/her parents
  • Be positive!!!
  • Be consistent
  • Provide examples of appropriate behaviors
  • Encourage learning of various strategies to address areas of difficulty (study skills, time management, coping skills, etc.)

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

What can I tell parents?

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

  • Obtain support (web communities, literature for parents, 2e newsletter, etc.)
  • Seek ways in and out of school to accommodate for gifts and disabilities/difficulties
  • Emphasize the student’s strengths
    • Recognize the value of highlighting gifts

Nurturing Potential Inspiring Excellence

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

  • Help the student and their parents think about and plan for the future
    • College – what environment would be the best fit?
    • Investigate careers that are good fits with the student’s gifts and areas of difficulty
  • Help the student and parents develop self-advocacy skills

Nurturing Potential Inspiring Excellence

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

  • Emphasize resiliency and persistence
  • Consider finding mentors in student’s area of interest
  • Reframe ideas of “learning disability” or “ASD”

Nurturing Potential Inspiring Excellence

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Conclusions

Nurturing Potential Inspiring Excellence

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The JAVITS Iowa Twice-Exceptional Project

Questions?

susan-assouline@uiowa.edu

megan-foley-nicpon@uiowa.edu

Nurturing Potential Inspiring Excellence