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Capitalization: races, nationalities, and species

Capitalization: races, nationalities, and species

Capitalization: races, nationalities, and species. Mini-Lesson # 26 From the UWF Writing Lab’s 101 Grammar Mini-Lessons Series. Capitalize nationalities (including nationality-related words such as languages) My brother likes cheddar, but he prefers Swiss cheese on his hamburgers.

By kevlyn
(174 views)

Indefinite Pronouns

Indefinite Pronouns

Indefinite Pronouns. Mini-lesson #10 From the UWF Writing Lab’s 101 Grammar Mini-Lessons Series. Singular Indefinite Pronouns. The following pronouns are singular:

By gus
(272 views)

Tuesday, August 28 th , 2012

Tuesday, August 28 th , 2012

Copy down agenda Journal write Mini-lesson: Complete sentences, run-ons, and fragments Writing activity based on mini-lesson. Tuesday, August 28 th , 2012. Reminder for Ms. Schmitt: Give “Completing sentences handout” to students!.

By karan
(108 views)

Plurals: Letters, Numbers, Symbols, Time Periods, etc.

Plurals: Letters, Numbers, Symbols, Time Periods, etc.

Mini-Lesson #77. Plurals: Letters, Numbers, Symbols, Time Periods, etc. From the UWF Writing Lab’s 101 Grammar Mini-Lessons Series. Use an apostrophe and –s to form the plurals of letters, numbers, symbols, and words named as words. *In some cases the apostrophe may be omitted. Examples.

By margot
(88 views)

Diction: All together and Altogether; All ready and Already

Diction: All together and Altogether; All ready and Already

Mini-Lesson #53. Diction: All together and Altogether; All ready and Already. From the UWF Writing Lab’s 101 Grammar Mini-Lessons Series. All ready vs. Already.

By mihaly
(120 views)

Possessives with Gerunds

Possessives with Gerunds

Possessives with Gerunds. From the UWF Writing Lab’s 101 Grammar Mini-Lessons Series Mini-Lesson #89. A gerund is the – ing form of a verb and is used a noun. Winning the lottery surprised them. Like nouns, gerunds are modified by possessive forms of nouns and pronouns.

By ellema
(644 views)

Subjunctive Mood

Subjunctive Mood

Subjunctive Mood. From the UWF Writing Lab’s 101 Grammar Mini-Lessons Mini-Lesson #96. The subjunctive mood of verbs indicates conditions contrary to fact: wishes, recommendations, and possibilities. I wish I were President of the United States.

By dyllis
(225 views)

Diction: Used to and Supposed to

Diction: Used to and Supposed to

Diction: Used to and Supposed to. Mini-Lesson # 59. From the UWF Writing Lab’s 101 Grammar Mini-Lessons Series. Though the d in supposed to and used to is not pronounced when speaking, it should not be omitted when writing. Incorrect:

By mahola
(109 views)

Pronoun Case: Who or Whoever Versus Whom or Whomever

Pronoun Case: Who or Whoever Versus Whom or Whomever

Pronoun Case: Who or Whoever Versus Whom or Whomever. MINI-LESSON #81 FROM THE UWF WRITING LAB’S 101 GRAMMAR MINI-LESSONS SERIES. Who and Whoever. Who and whoever are used when a subject is needed. Substitute he (or she ) for who and whoever .

By aletta
(63 views)


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