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PHYS 1441 – Section 002 Lecture #17

PHYS 1441 – Section 002 Lecture #17

PHYS 1441 – Section 002 Lecture #17. Monday, Nov. 15, 2010 Dr. Jae hoon Yu. Linear Momentum Conservation Collisions Center of Mass Fundamentals of Rotational Motion. Today’s homework is homework #10, due 10pm, Tuesday, Nov. 23!!. Announcements. Quiz #5

By Patman
(628 views)

Momentum and Collisions

Momentum and Collisions

Momentum and Collisions. Momentum and Impulse. Section Objectives. Compare the momentum of different moving objects. Compare the momentum of the same object moving with different velocities. Identify examples of change in the momentum of an object

By paul2
(505 views)

Physics I Class 12

Physics I Class 12

Physics I Class 12. Conservative Forces, Non-Conservative Forces, and Collisions. Conservation of Energy (Review). Conservative Forces Non-Conservative Forces. Is Mechanical Energy Always Conserved?. Example of Energy Lost to Friction (Non-Conservative Force).

By atalo
(108 views)

9.8   Momentum and Kinetic Energy in Collisions

9.8   Momentum and Kinetic Energy in Collisions

9.8   Momentum and Kinetic Energy in Collisions. The linear momentum is conserved for collisions in a closed and isolated system. In an elastic collision, the total kinetic energy is conserved. In an inelastic collision, the total kinetic energy is not conserved.

By tyme
(540 views)

5.2 Collisions

5.2 Collisions

Chapter 5 Momentum Ewen et al. 2005 ). 5.2 Collisions. Objective: Apply the law of conservation of momentum to both elastic and inelastic collisions of two objects. Conservation of Momentum and Collisions.

By lynn
(135 views)

Chapter 7

Chapter 7

Chapter 7. Momentum. 7.1 Momentum. Mass is inertia and momentum is inertia in motion momentum = mass × velocity momentum = mv Measured in N·s or kg·m/s Moving object can have large momentum if it has a large mass, a high speed, or both. 7.2 Impulse Changes Momentum.

By istas
(143 views)

Momentum and Inertia

Momentum and Inertia

Momentum and Inertia. Momentum. Momentum = mass x velocity MV = P Momentum is inertia in motion. A moving object has more p than an object with less m. An object at rest has no p (v = 0). Momentum. If the p of an object changes, the m, v, or both MUST change.

By eljah
(176 views)

Momentum: Unit 5

Momentum: Unit 5

Momentum: Unit 5. What is Momentum?. Momentum: ______ in motion The more _______ an object has, the more ________ there is possible. ________ affects the momentum of an object. EX. A fast car can have more momentum than a slow truck w/ greater mass

By clarice
(128 views)

Conservation of momentum

Conservation of momentum

Conservation of momentum. Momentum before = momentum after p o = p m a v oa + m b v ob = m a v a + m b v b m a v oa + m b v ob = (m a + m b ) v ab. Conservation of momentum. Momentum before = momentum after p o = p m a v oa + m b v ob = m a v a + m b v b

By colette
(121 views)

Physics 1210/1310

Physics 1210/1310

Mechanics & Thermodynamics. Physics 1210/1310. Lecture C1-7, chapter 6 - 8. Work and Energy. http://www.pa.uky.edu/~phy211/VecArith/. Group Task Is the total work done by all forces positive, negative, or zero?. Find speed from KE problem – ex 6.4. W tot = W T + W f + W w + W n.

By raiden
(152 views)

Anti-Newtonian Dynamics

Anti-Newtonian Dynamics

Anti-Newtonian Dynamics. J. C. Sprott Department of Physics University of Wisconsin – Madison (in collaboration with Vladimir Zhdankin) Presented at the TAAPT Conference in Martin, Tennessee on March 27, 2010. Newton’s Laws of Motion.

By nuru
(111 views)

Collisions Summary

Collisions Summary

Collisions Summary. Elastic Collisions . Total momentum is conserved Total kinetic energy is conserved. Inelastic Collisions. Total momentum is conserved Total kinetic energy is NOT conserved.

By aysel
(229 views)

Collisions

Collisions

Collisions. basically include every interaction. § 8.3–8.4. All Interactions. Interacting objects apply equal and opposite forces (and impulses) to each other Total momentum is conserved. Elastic Collisions. Objects bounce apart after collision

By cachet
(137 views)

I. Physical Properties

I. Physical Properties

Gases. I. Physical Properties. Real vs. Ideal Gases:. Ideal gas = an imaginary gas that conforms perfectly to all the assumptions of the kinetic-molecular theory We will assume that the gases used for the gas law problems are ideal gases . Real Gases vs. Ideal Gases:.

By morey
(288 views)

Types of Collisions

Types of Collisions

Types of Collisions. Elastic collisions-Two objects collide, temporarily misshape, and spring away from each other… KE and momentum are conserved . Inelastic collisions conserve momentum but not KE…some energy is lost to non-conservative forces such as thermal energy/friction.

By konala
(138 views)

Engineering Fundamentals 151

Engineering Fundamentals 151

Engineering Fundamentals 151. Rube Goldberg Design Ryan Hodges Tom Singleton Travis Vaughn Michael Ewing. Schlooders Mcgoovers. Materials. 1” PVC pipe Three 45 g steel balls, One 67 g steel ball Funnel Plastic cup, Bottom of Plastic Bottel 2 pulleys and string Wood Mousetrap

By emery
(117 views)

Chapter 11

Chapter 11

Chapter 11. Gases. 10. 1 Kinetic Molecular Theory. State the kinetic-molecular theory of matter, and describe how it explains certain properties of matter. List the five assumptions of the kinetic-molecular theory of gases. Define the terms ideal gas and real gas.

By gage
(167 views)

Unit 4 KMT, Gas Laws and States of Matter

Unit 4 KMT, Gas Laws and States of Matter

Unit 4 KMT, Gas Laws and States of Matter Learning Target: I can describe differences between solids, liquids and gases at the atomic and molecular levels. . Solids Solids have definite shapes and definite volume. Crystalline solids – highly ordered arrangement of

By mrinal
(151 views)

Elastic Collisions and Recoil (The anti-collision)

Elastic Collisions and Recoil (The anti-collision)

Elastic Collisions and Recoil (The anti-collision). DN. What is the difference between an elastic and an inelastic collision? What does it mean that “momentum is conserved” before, during and after a collision? What is the momentum of a 16,000 kg train traveling at 10 m/s?

By paxton
(216 views)

MOMENTUM & IMPULSE

MOMENTUM & IMPULSE

MOMENTUM & IMPULSE. Momentum : product of a system’s mass it’s linear velocity Δ P = m Δ V = m ( V f – V i ) Units: kg·m /s = N·s More massive…..more mo’ Greater velocity….more mo ’ Is a vector Momentum provides inertia. Ex.1

By kirsi
(64 views)

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