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RTI and PBS: The Basics and a Blueprint for Implementation. Jason E. Harlacher, PhD, NCSP Washoe County School District; Reno, NV Heidi Mathie Mucha, PhD Utah Personnel Development Center; Salt Lake City, UT. jasonharlacher@gmail.com heidim@updc.org. Agenda. Principles behind RTI and PBS

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RTI and PBS: The Basics and a Blueprint for Implementation


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    1. RTI and PBS: The Basics and a Blueprint for Implementation Jason E. Harlacher, PhD, NCSP Washoe County School District; Reno, NV Heidi Mathie Mucha, PhD Utah Personnel Development Center; Salt Lake City, UT jasonharlacher@gmail.com heidim@updc.org

    2. Agenda • Principles behind RTI and PBS • Features of RTI • One example of RTI • Features of PBS • One example of PBS • Process of Implementation • Questions/Info Sharing Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    3. Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    4. One Perspective on History Talented & Gifted Special Education Title I Regular Education Tutors Parents Universities After-School ELL/ESL Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    5. Basic Definitions • Response to Intervention (RTI) and Positive Behavior Supports (PBS) are school-wide prevention models. Provide a range of supports to students by restructuring how schools deliver services. • RTI = academics • PBS = behavior Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    6. Principles of RTI/PBS • Proactive and Preventative • Instructional Match • Problem Solving Focused and Data-based Decisions • Effective Practices • School-wide Approach Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    7. 1. Proactive and Preventative • Identify and intervene before problems occur or become entrenched. • Screening all students • Range of supports Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    8. 2. Instructional Match • Level of support matches need. • Examine all areas that affect the student. • Instructional approach (with behavior too) Academic and Behavioral Curriculum Instruction & Environment Learner

    9. 3. Problem Solving Focused & Data-based Decisions • Use of the problem solving model to guide decisions around intervention/support. • Gap between what isexpected and what occurs • What is the problem? 3. What can we do about the problem? • Why is it happening? 4. Did the intervention/plan work?

    10. 3. Problem-Solving Focused & Data-based Decisions “Without data, you’re just another person with an opinion”.

    11. 4. Effective Practices • Use research-based, validated practices • To ensure students have the best chance of success • Includes consideration of fidelity/integrity Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    12. 5. Schoolwide Approach • Apply model to whole-school • As opposed to one student or one classroom. • Creates continuity, clarity, and consistency.

    13. Pause • Share with a neighbor something that sticks out from what we just went over. Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    14. Features of RTI • Tiers of Instructional Support • Assessment System • Protocol • Evidence-based Instruction • Ongoing Professional Development Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    15. 1) Tiers of Instructional Support Universal Level/Tier I: Core instruction (90/60 minutes), whole/small group Secondary Level/Tier II: Core + 45 minutes small-group (5-8:1), skill-based Tertiary Level/Tier III: Core + 30 mins (3-5:1), individualized (can replace or be in addition to Tier II ) Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    16. 2) Assessment System • Complete system used to screen, diagnose difficulties, and to progress monitor • Screener = brief, indicates if student is at-risk for academic difficulties or not • Is student on grade level or not? • Diagnostic = more comprehensive and longer test that teases out strengths vs. weaknesses • Why is student scoring below grade level or at risk? • Formative = quick checks to determine if instructional program is effective for student or not • Is the current plan working? Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    17. 2) Assessment System Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    18. 2) Assessment System • Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) is a standardized method of assessment. • Reliable, valid, standardized, sensitive to growth, efficient Is the student at risk? (screener) Is the instructional plan effective? (progress monitoring/formative assessment) Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    19. 3) Protocol • Refers to the process the school follows for providing students support. • Outlines “Who gets what when? • Standard Protocol: • Same for all (e.g., 45 minutes phonics) • Problem Solving: • Individually designed intervention • Combined Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    20. 4) Evidence-based Instruction • Empirically supported effectiveness • High rates of opportunities to respond, high engagement, good pacing • Corrective and immediate feedback • Differentiated instruction • Explicit instruction on big ideas within that subject • Programs with demonstrated effectiveness • Good “Academic Learning Time” Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    21. 5) Ongoing Professional Development • Staff understands the how and why behind RTI. • Ongoing, in small increments, with follow-up and feedback on use of new skills Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    22. Response to Intervention Ongoing Professional Development Tiers ofInstruction Protocol AssessmentSystem EffectivePractices Proactive, Preventative Instructional Match Problem Solving Focused Data-based Decisions Schoolwide Approach

    23. A Case Study • Lemmon Valley Elementary School • Reno, NV • 700+ students in K-6 • In year 4 of not making AYP • Principal, Vice principal, counselor, psych, 2 Special Ed teachers, 3 ESL, 2 SLPs, Autism classroom, Life skills classroom Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    24. Features of RTI • Tiers of Instructional Support • Assessment System • Protocol • Effective Practices (Evidence-based Instruction) • Ongoing Professional Development Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    25. Lemmon Valley Elementary: Intervention Assistance Team • Manages implementation of RTI and Tier 3 cases • Administrator, grade-level reps, counselor, psychologist, instructional coach • Time keeper • Content expert (instruction, reading) • RTI expert • Assessment/data expert • Facilitator/Leadership Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    26. Lemmon Valley Elementary 1) Tiers of Instructional Support Universal Level/Tier I: 90 minute block for reading using Houghton Mifflin; 60 minute math block using Everyday Math Secondary Level/Tier II: 45 minute block, 5 days/week. (3 days reading, 2 days math) Tertiary Level/Tier III: Typically replaces Tier 2 time. Includes individualized plan. Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    27. Lemmon Valley Elementary • 2) Assessment System • Screeners: CBM probes in reading and math (AIMSweb) • Diagnostics: IRI, QSI, Accuracy and rate on R-CBM, District benchmark tests, end of unit tests from core program, Curriculum-Based Evaluation • Formatives: CBM in reading and math, District benchmarks Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    28. Lemmon Valley Elementary • 3) Protocol • Combination of standard treatment protocol and problem-solving protocol • Tier 2 = standard treatment • Tier 3 = problem-solving protocol Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    29. Lemmon Valley Elementary: Tier 2

    30. Tier 2 (cont) Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    31. Tier 2 (cont) Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    32. Tier 3 placement • PLCs refer to IAT • If placed, student begins Tier 3 immediately (each grade-level has a teacher designated to teach Tier 3) • Problem-solving assessment conducted (RIOT/ICEL) and “Planning Meeting” is held to design the student’s Tier 3 plan. Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    33. Tier 3 Referral Questions

    34. Solutions Planning Sheet for Tier 3 Sheet

    35. Tier 3 Example • 3rd grader, reading mid 1st grade • Core time with differentiated instruction, small-group focusing on vocabulary • 45 minutes/5 days/week with Horizons • Reading with parent using leveled readers, 3 times/week at home (20 minutes) with daily log • High school reading buddy previewing story from lesson in morning Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    36. Logistics • Who “manages” students? • When/who provides Tier 2 interventions? • How is movement between tiers decided? • IAT agenda Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    37. Management of students • Tier 1 = Classroom teachers • Tier 2 = PLCs • Tier 3 = IAT • Special Education = IAT/Special Ed team Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    38. N = 19 (11/6/3) N = 17 (13/3/1) N = 7 N = 18 N = 5 57 Students 3 Reg Ed Teachers1 Special Ed Teacher1 ESL Teacher N = 7 N = 21 (15/4/2) N = 20

    39. Movement between Tiers Into Tier 3: 720 mins of intervention time, 8 data points indicating below-goal growth; IAT decision Into Tier 2 from Tier 3: IAT decision based on student’s growth and performance Into Tier 2: 3 sources of below grade-level performance; PLC decision Into Tier 1 from Tier 2: 3 consecutive data points above goal or 2-3 sources documenting grade-level performance Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    40. IAT Agenda • Set monthly agenda topics Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    41. Features of PBS Harlacher & Mucha, 2010

    42. Tier 1 Phase 1: Focuses on school wide PBIS. (General settings to classroom settings.)

    43. 4 Components of PBIS

    44. Establish Expectations • Define what is needed for students and staff to be successful socially • Develop looks and sounds like matrix with all common (non classroom settings) well defined • Consensus must be gained prior to implementation

    45. Expectations

    46. Don’t Be Miss Mutner