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June 2013 PowerPoint Presentation
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June 2013 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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June 2013

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  1. REDUCING FOOD LOSS AND WASTE Installment 2 of “Creating a Sustainable Food Future” June 2013 Photo: WRAP Brian Lipinski, Associate, World Resources Report

  2. ABOUT WRI WRI’S MISSION |To move human society to live in ways that protect Earth's environment and its capacity to provide for the needs and aspirations of current and future generations.

  3. WRR 2013-2014: SUSTAINABLE FOOD FUTURES Howcan the world adequately feed more than 9 billion people by 2050 in a manner that advances economic development while reducing pressure on ecosystems, climate, and freshwater resources?

  4. THE SIZE OF FOOD LOSS AND WASTE (2009) 24%of global food supply by energy content (calories) 32% of global food supply by weight Source: WRI analysis based on FAO. 2011. Global food losses and food waste – extent, causes and prevention. Rome: UN FAO.

  5. DEFINITIONS After produce leaves the farm for handling, storage, and transport During industrial or domestic processing and/or packaging During distribution to markets, including losses at wholesale and retail markets During or immediately after harvesting on the farm Losses in the home or business of the consumer, including restaurants and caterers Source: WRI analysis based on FAO. 2011. Global food losses and food waste – extent, causes and prevention. Rome: UN FAO.

  6. SHARE OF TOTAL FOOD LOSS AND WASTE IN THE VALUE CHAIN, 2009 100% = 1.5 quadrillion kcal Source: WRI analysis based on FAO. 2011. Global food losses and food waste – extent, causes and prevention. Rome: UN FAO.

  7. SHARE OF GLOBAL FOOD LOSS AND WASTE BY COMMODITY, 2009 Source: WRI analysis based on FAO. 2011. Global food losses and food waste – extent, causes and prevention. Rome: UN FAO.

  8. SHARE OF COMMODITY LOST OR WASTED, 2009 (Percent of kcal) Note: Values displayed are of waste as a percent of food supply, defined here as the sum of the “Food” and “Processing” columns of the FAO Food Balance Sheet. Source: WRI analysis based on FAO. 2011. Global food losses and food waste – extent, causes and prevention. Rome: UN FAO.

  9. SHARE OF GLOBAL FOOD LOSS AND WASTE BY REGION, 2009 (100% = 1.5 quadrillion kcal) Note: Number may not sum to 100 due to rounding. Source: WRI analysis based on FAO. 2011. Global food losses and food waste – extent, causes and prevention. Rome: UN FAO.

  10. FOOD LOST OR WASTED BY REGION, 2009 Kcal/capita/day Source: WRI analysis based on FAO. 2011. Global food losses and food waste – extent, causes and prevention. Rome: UN FAO.

  11. FOOD LOST OR WASTED BY REGION AND STAGE IN VALUE CHAIN, 2009 Percent of kcal lost and wasted Note: Number may not sum to 100 due to rounding. Source: WRI analysis based on FAO. 2011. Global food losses and food waste – extent, causes and prevention. Rome: UN FAO.

  12. IMPLICATIONS: ECONOMIC US$1600/year for an American family of four £680/year for the average household in the UK US$32 billion worth of food thrown away in China each year

  13. IMPLICATIONS: ENVIRONMENTAL Greenhouse gas emissions Land use

  14. REDUCING FOOD LOSS AND WASTE CAN CLOSE THE 2050 FOOD GAP BY 22% Global annual crop production (kcal trillion)* 15,532 1,314 9,491 Food loss and waste savings (50% reduction) 2006 - food availability 2050 - baseline food availability needed * Includes all crops intended for direct human consumption, animal feed, industrial uses, seeds, and biofuels Source: WRI analysis based on Bruinsma, J. 2009. The Resource Outlook to 2050: By how much do land, water and crop yields need to increase by 2050? Rome: FAO; Alexandratos, N., and J. Bruinsma. 2012. World agriculture towards 2030/2050: The 2012 revision. Rome: FAO.

  15. FOOD REDISTRIBUTION

  16. EVAPORATIVE COOLERS

  17. SMALL METAL SILOS

  18. PLASTIC CRATES

  19. OTHER FACTORS • Infrastructure (e.g. roads) • Market access • Interaction across the supply chain

  20. RECOMMENDATION: SET FOOD LOSS AND WASTE REDUCTION TARGETS • Global • National • Sub-national • Private sector

  21. RECOMMENDATION: INCREASE INVESTMENT IN POSTHARVEST LOSS RESEARCH IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

  22. RECOMMENDATION: CREATE ENTITIES DEVOTED TO REDUCING FOOD WASTE IN DEVELOPED COUNTRIES

  23. RECOMMENDATION: ACCELERATE AND SUPPORT INITIATIVES TO REDUCE FOOD LOSS AND WASTE

  24. RECOMMENDATION: DEVELOP A “FOOD LOSS AND WASTE PROTOCOL”

  25. www.worldresourcesreport.org