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Foundations of Excellence: Implementing the Path Toward Excellence for First-Year Students. Scott E. Evenbeck October 2, 2009 University of Colorado, Denver. Contact. Scott E. Evenbeck, Dean IUPUI University College 815 West Michigan Street Indianapolis, IN 46202 317.274.5032

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Foundations of Excellence: Implementing the Path Toward Excellence for First-Year Students


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    1. Foundations of Excellence: Implementing the Path Toward Excellence for First-Year Students Scott E. Evenbeck October 2, 2009 University of Colorado, Denver

    2. Contact Scott E. Evenbeck, Dean IUPUI University College 815 West Michigan Street Indianapolis, IN 46202 317.274.5032 evenbeck@iupui.edu www.universitycollege.iupui.edu

    3. “The campus environment--how an institution structures the new student experience--plays an important role in determining how students spend their time, how they engage in learning, and whether they decide to return for the second year or even the next term. Yet campus assessment often focuses primarily on student characteristics rather than the institution's policies, practices, and procedures.”

    4. Think Back… Can you remember your first semester in college? Why did you stay or why did you leave?

    5. Outline • The National Picture • Centering on Learning • LEAP Student Learning Outcomes • LEAP Principles of Excellence • Foundations of Excellence • An Example • First Year Seminar • National Learning Communities • Data • The Challenge – Providing a Context for Student Success

    6. The National Picture

    7. Total Urban Rural • The future of American higher education will be increasingly influenced by urban universities – clear urbanization trends • Universities have become increasingly more engaged with communities – land grant tradition began with Morrill Act (1862) – must now have a strong forward-thinking advocate for urban grants • Improve the social, educational, • economic, cultural, health sectors of the community U.S. Population (in millions) Source: Sukhatme, U. “University College IUPUI Academic Plan.” University College Faculty Retreat, September , 2009.

    8. Source: Academic Dean’s Retreat 2009

    9. Centering on Learning

    10. Comparing Educational ParadigmsMission and Purposes Source: Barr, R. B. & Tagg, J. (1995). From teaching to learning---A paradigm for undergraduate education, Change, 27, 12-25.

    11. Comparing Educational ParadigmsCriteria for Success Source: Barr, R. B. & Tagg, J. (1995). From teaching to learning---A paradigm for undergraduate education, Change, 27, 12-25.

    12. Comparing Educational ParadigmsTeaching/Learning Structures Source: Barr, R. B. & Tagg, J. (1995). From teaching to learning---A paradigm for undergraduate education, Change, 27, 12-25.

    13. Comparing Educational ParadigmsLearning Theory Source: Barr, R. B. & Tagg, J. (1995). From teaching to learning---A paradigm for undergraduate education, Change, 27, 12-25.

    14. Comparing Educational ParadigmsProductivity/Funding Source: Barr, R. B. & Tagg, J. (1995). From teaching to learning---A paradigm for undergraduate education, Change, 27, 12-25.

    15. Comparing Educational ParadigmsNature of Roles Source: Barr, R. B. & Tagg, J. (1995). From teaching to learning---A paradigm for undergraduate education, Change, 27, 12-25.

    16. Centering on Learning • Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) of Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU)

    17. Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) • The Essential Learning Outcomes • The Principles of Excellence Source: Association of American Colleges and Universities. (2007). College Learning for the New Century.

    18. Essential Learning Outcomes Beginning in school, and continuing at successively higher levels across their college studies, students should prepare for twenty-first century challenges by gaining:

    19. Essential Learning Outcomes Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World • Through study in the science and mathematics, social sciences, humanities, histories, languages, and the arts

    20. Essential Learning Outcomes Intellectual and Practical Skills • Inquiry and analysis • Critical and creative thinking • Written and oral communication • Quantitative literacy • Information literacy • Teamwork and problem solving

    21. Essential Learning Outcomes Personal and Social Responsibility • Civic knowledge and engagement —local and global • Intercultural knowledge and competence • Ethical reasoning and action • Foundations and skills for lifelong learning

    22. Essential Learning Outcomes Integrative Learning • Synthesis and advanced accomplishment across general and specialized studies

    23. Principles of Excellence Principle One: Aim High and Make Excellence Inclusive • Make the Essential Learning Outcomes a framework for the entire educational experience, connecting school, college, work, and life

    24. Principles of Excellence Principle Two: Give Students a Compass • Focus each student’s plan of study on achieving the Essential Learning Outcomes and assess progress

    25. Principles of Excellence Principle Three: Teach the Arts of Inquiry and Innovation • Immerse all students in analysis, discovery, problem solving, and communication, beginning in school and advancing in college

    26. Principles of Excellence Principle Four: Engage the Big Questions • Teach through the curriculum to far-reaching issues—contemporary and enduring—in science and society, cultures and values, global interdependence, the changing economy, and human dignity and freedom

    27. Principles of Excellence Principle Five: Connect Knowledge with Choices and Action • Prepare students for citizenship and work through engaged and guided learning on “real-world” problems

    28. Principles of Excellence Principle Six: Foster Civic, Intercultural, and Ethical Learning • Emphasize personal and social responsibility, in every field of study

    29. Principles of Excellence Principle Seven: Assess Students’ Ability to Apply Learning to Complex Problems • Use assessment to deepen learning and to establish a culture of shared purpose and continuous improvement

    30. Foundations of Excellence

    31. Philosophy Dimension Approach the first year in ways that are intentional and based on a philosophy/rationale of the first year that informs relevant institutional policies and practices. The philosophy/rationale is explicit, clear and easily understood, consistent with the institutional mission, widely disseminated, and, as appropriate, reflects a consensus of campus constituencies. The philosophy/rationale is also the basis for first-year organizational policies, practices, structures, leadership, department/unit philosophies, and resource allocation. Source: http://www.fyfoundations.org/4year.aspx

    32. University of Colorado, DenverFirst-Year Philosophy Disseminate the UC Denver philosophy developed under the FoEprogram Responsible Unit: Quality Undergraduate Education Resources Required: Minimal (for marketing and brochures) While many of the UC Denver campus units have mission statements, prior to FoE there was no overall philosophy statement for the first-year experience. The UC Denver philosophy statement recommendation is given in the Philosophy Dimension Committee summary report (see Appendix). Inherent in the introduction of a FYE philosophy for UC Denver is the widespread dissemination of the philosophy focused on creating a new culture and new traditions around the FYE. The Philosophy Dimension Committee recommends the utilization of the philosophy statement in: • communication with students and parents • first-year student orientation • first-year seminar courses • student “road maps” that identify key milestones and campus resources • learning and living communities • student support offices • new faculty and staff orientations Until such time that the proposed FYE Steering Committee is implemented, it will be the responsibility of the Quality Undergraduate Education committee to review, approve, and disseminate the UC Denver FY philosophy statement.

    33. Organization Dimension Create organizational structures and policies that provide a comprehensive, integrated, and coordinated approach to the first year. These structures and policies provide oversight and alignment of all first-year efforts. A coherent first-year experience is realized and maintained through effective partnerships among academic affairs, student affairs, and other administrative units and is enhanced by ongoing faculty and staff development activities and appropriate budgetary arrangements. http://www.fyfoundations.org/4year.aspx

    34. If it is not someone’s work, it is no one’s work.

    35. How can you develop a community of practice?

    36. Learning Dimension Deliver intentional curricular and co-curricular learning experiences that engage students in order to develop knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors consistent with the desired outcomes of higher education and the institution’s philosophy and mission. Whether in or out of the classroom, learning also promotes increased competence in critical thinking, ethical development, and the lifelong pursuit of knowledge. Source: http://www.fyfoundations.org/4year.aspx

    37. Might the Campus Articulate Learning Outcomes Across the Curriculum?

    38. FacultyDimension Make the first college year a high priority for the faculty. These instructions are characterized by a culture of faculty responsibility for the first year that is realized through high-quality instruction in first-year classes and substantial interaction between faculty and first-year students both inside and outside the classroom. This culture of responsibility is nurtured by chief academic officers, deans, and department chairs and supported by the institutions’ reward systems. Source: http://www.fyfoundations.org/4year.aspx

    39. Faculty have to be at the center

    40. TransitionsDimension Facilitate appropriate student transitions through policies and practices that are intentional and aligned with institutional mission. Beginning with recruitment and admissions and continuing through the first year, institutions communicate clear curricular and co-curricular expectations and provide appropriate support for educational success. They are forthright about their responsibilities to students as well as students’ responsibilities to themselves and the institution. They create and maintain curricular alignments with secondary schools and linkages with secondary school personnel, families, and other sources of support, as appropriate. Source: http://www.fyfoundations.org/4year.aspx

    41. It’s the right thing to establish a one-stop first-year student services/orientation center. It’s right to have a seamless FYE w/orientation, seminars, and advising. Orientation must be required.

    42. All Students Dimension Serve all first-year students according to their varied needs. The process of anticipating, diagnosing, and addressing needs is ongoing and is subject to assessment and adjustment throughout the first year. Institutions provide services with respect for the students’ abilities, backgrounds, interests, and experiences. Institutions also ensure a campus environment that is inclusive and safe for all students. Source: http://www.fyfoundations.org/4year.aspx

    43. Mentoring Works • Research Works

    44. Diversity Dimension Ensure that all first-year students experience diverse ideas, worldviews, and culturesas a means of enhancing their learning and preparing them to become members of pluralistic communities. Whatever their demographic composition, institutions structure experiences in which students interact in an open and civil community with people from backgrounds and cultures different from their own, reflect on ideas and values different from those they currently hold, and explore their own cultures and the cultures of others. Source: http://www.fyfoundations.org/4year.aspx

    45. Stress Diversity

    46. Roles and Purposes Dimension Promote student understanding of the various roles and purposes of higher education, both for the individual and for society. These roles and purposes include knowledge acquisition for personal growth, learning to prepare for future employment, learning to become engaged citizens, and learning to serve the public good. Institutions encourage first-year students to examine systematically their motivation and goals with regard to higher education in general and to their own college/university. Students are exposed to the value of general education as well as to the value of more focused, in-depth study of a field or fields of knowledge (i.e. the major). Source: http://www.fyfoundations.org/4year.aspx

    47. Careers are important • Experiential education works • Preparing citizens

    48. Improvement Dimension Conduct assessment and maintain associations with other institutions and relevant professional organizations in order to achieve ongoing first-year improvement. This assessment is specific to the first year as a unit of analysis—a distinct time period and set of experiences, academic and otherwise, in the lives of students. It is also linked systemically to the institutions’ overall assessment. Assessment results are an integral part of institutional planning, resource allocation, decision-making, and ongoing improvement of programs and policies as they affect first-year students. As part of the enhancement process and as a way to achieve ongoing improvement, institutions are familiar with current practices at other institutions as well as with research and scholarship on the first college year. Source: http://www.fyfoundations.org/4year.aspx