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Building positive interactions

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  1. Building positive interactions Concordia University Tellina Alvord June 2013

  2. Introduction Classroom interactions have an impact on how students relate to each other. Too often, especially in a high school setting, those interactions can be negative. When they go on to long, they take on the nature of bullying. As a classroom teacher, it is my job to make classroom a safe and secure place full of positive interactions.

  3. Literature Review Parental Characteristics Associated With Bullying Perpetration in US Children Aged 10 to 17 Years “A recent meta-analysis of school-based bullying prevention interventions concluded that parent training and education are essential components of effective interventions to reduce bullying which suggests that parental characteristics and behaviors may influence child bullying. However, little information is available on parental characteristics associated with child bullying in the United States and whether these characteristics influence bullying independent of child or community characteristics (pg 2280).”

  4. Cyberbullying, School Bullying, and Psychological Distress: A Regional Census of High School Students “In this study, we used data collected from more than 20 000 students from the second wave of the MetroWest Adolescent Health Survey to examine patterns and correlates of bullying victimization. We first examined the prevalence of cyberbullying and school bullying and the degree of overlap between the 2 forms of victimization. Next, looking at youths who experienced cyberbullying only, school bullying only, or both types of bullying, we identified sociodemographic and individual-level school characteristics associated with each type of victimization. Finally, we analyzed the relationship between type of bullying victimization and multiple indicators of psychological distress, ranging from depressive symptoms to suicide attempts (pg 172 ).”

  5. Involvement in Bullying among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Parents’ Perspectives on the Influence of School Factors. “The current study bullying among students with ASD’s within the context with parental school involvement and perceptions of school climate (pg 179).” • School leadership and counselors working together to address bullying. This articles address the following questions: • What are the student roles in bullying? • What kind of school policy will be implemented to stop bullying? • Integrating bullying prevention into schoolwide positive behavior support “This article describes (a) common steps taken in schools to respond to bullying behavior, (b) why these steps may be less effective, (c) a promising approach of integrating bullying prevention into existing schoolwide behavior support systems, and (d) a case study describing and showing outcomes of this integrated approach. (pg 49-50)”

  6. Research group • The research group will be my junior/senior high students who receive special education services. • My caseload consisted of 26 students, grades 7-12) this last year. One student tested out and three others receive services at alternative locations. Of the 26 students, there were 16 boys and 10 girls. Disabilities included other health impaired (4), specific learning disabilities (10), speech/language impairment (2), behavior (1), orthopedic impairment (1), and mental handicap (8). Eight students are Hispanic. This fall there will also be an autistic student.

  7. Statement of ethical considerations • This study will be the implementation of best practices within the classroom setting. • The principal will be aware of what strategies will be used and the parents will receive a handout at open house sharing that this classroom will be a place of positive interactions and students expectations will be shared.

  8. Data collection • Each day students will fill in a log in sheet documenting what they are working on. Staff will document important events/interactions that occur during the class period. Students will receive a daily score on respect issues with zero being the lowest and a three the highest. • All office referrals will be documented including time, situation and those involved.

  9. Data analysis • A weekly review of anecdotal records will occur with the resource teacher and para professionals. • Trends in behavior will be noted and strategies adapted as needed within the framework of the plan. • Individual student trends will also be watched for and behavior plans put in place if warranted following a functional behavior analysis.

  10. References • Austin, S. M., Reynolds, G. P., & Barnes, S. L. (2012). School leadership and counselors working together to address bullying. Education, 133(2), 283-290. • Good, C., McIntosh, K., & Gletz, C. (2011). Integrating bullying prevention into schoolwide positive behavior support. Teaching Exceptional Children, 44(1), 48-56. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier • Schneider, S., O’Donnell, L., Stueve, A., & Coulter, R. S. (2012). Cyberbullying, School Bullying, and Psychological Distress: A Regional Census of High School Students. American Journal Of Public Health, 102(1), 171-177. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2011.300308 • Shetgiri, R., Lin, H., Avila, R. M., & Flores, G. (2012). Parental Characteristics Associated With Bullying Perpetration in US Children Aged 10 to 17 Years. American Journal Of Public Health, 102(12), 2280-2286. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2012.300725 Retrieved from Academic Search Premier • Zablotsky, B., Bradshaw, C. P., Anderson, C., & Law, P. (2012). Involvement in Bullying among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Parents’ Perspectives on the Influence of School Factors. Behavioral Disorders, 37(3), 179-191.