the elements of style and tone by katy gladden
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The Elements of Style and Tone by Katy Gladden. Many people enjoy reading and analyzing selections of fiction. Why is this?. http://www.morguefile.com/archive/display/71244. Studying the writing style and tone used by an author helps us to interpret the story.

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the elements of style and tone by katy gladden
The Elements of Style and Tone by Katy Gladden
  • Many people enjoy

reading and

analyzing selections of fiction.

  • Why is this?

http://www.morguefile.com/archive/display/71244

slide2
Studying the writing style and tone used by an author helps us to interpret the story.

http://www.morguefile.com/archive/display/82612

writing style
Writing Style
  • In the class text, A Critical Handbook of Children’s Literature by Rebecca J. Lukens, the author defines the literary element of writing style as:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/a-critical-handbook-of-childrens-literature-rebecca-j-lukens/1002298562?ean=9780205492183&itm=1&usri=a%2bcritical%2bhandbook%2bof%2bchildren%2bs%2bliterature

“…how an author says something as opposed to what he says.” (Page 189).

style and story
Style and Story
  • The author mentions that the type of style is selected to best suit the needs of the story.

http://www.morguefile.com/archive/display/101565

writing style1
Writing Style
  • In the following presentation, the story, No, David! is discussed to show how the writing style functions to support the story line.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/imageviewer.asp?ean=9780590930024&imId=

story summary
Story Summary
  • No, David! is the story of a mischievous little five year old boy who is constantly pushing behavior limits with his mother.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/imageviewer.asp?ean=9780590930024&imId=

story summary1
Story Summary
  • In the opening page of the book, David is precariously reaching for the cookie jar on the top shelf of the kitchen cabinet while standing on top of a chair. He has a determined look on his face and his mother admonishes, “No, David!” (Page 4).
  • The rest of the story is a series of similar challenging incidents until finally David finds his limits and seeks refuge into his mother’s loving arms.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/imageviewer.asp?ean=9780590930024&imId=

characteristics of writing style
Characteristics of Writing Style
  • As an example, Mr. Shannon uses child like vocabulary to accentuate the young age of main character called David.
  • In this story, David is approximately five years old.
  • The vocabulary is simple, limited in content, and easily understood by a young child.

http://www.morguefile.com/archive/display/3385

writing style2
Writing Style
  • The words of the story are printed in a juvenile style font as if to appear written by a young child.
  • Limited text is written on each page.

http://www.morguefile.com/archive/display/55249

slide10
Tone
  • Most of the sentences are spoken by the mother in a didactic style (command form) of tone to show how the mother is instructing her son about proper behavior.
  • Further, the mother uses a type of condescending tone with her young troublesome child.
  • “Go to your room!” (Page 14 ).

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/imageviewer.asp?ean=9780590930024&imId=

tone through illustrations
Tone Through Illustrations
  • The tone is further reinforced by the illustrations.
  • The author draws David looking mischievous, determined, and with expressive body language.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/imageviewer.asp?ean=9780590930024&imId=

tone through illustrations1
Tone Through Illustrations
  • The illustrations also include vivid colors, simple lines, and humorous facial expressions.
  • The text is large and usually portrays a single scene for every one or two pages.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/imageviewer.asp?ean=9780590930024&imId=

book award
Book Award

http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php

  • No, David! also received the Caldecott Honor Award in 1999.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/imageviewer.asp?ean=9780590930024&imId=

summary
Summary
  • One can see how the author cleverly uses the style and the tone of the story to create empathy between the reader and the main character in this story.
  • For this reason, this book is very popular with young elementary school aged children everywhere.

http://www.morguefile.com/archive/display/104729

works cited
Works Cited
  • Bolle, Sonia. "David Shannon: A Merry Prankster." Publishers Weekly 246.29 (1999): 168. Literary Reference Center. EBSCO. Web. 8 July 2011.
  • Carpenter, Susan. "At 51, David Shannon stays in touch with his inner child - latimes.com." Los Angeles Times - California, national and world news - latimes.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 July 2011. .
  • Lukens, Rebecca J. A Critical Handbook of Children's Literature. Boston: Pearson Allyn and Bacon, 2007. Print.
  • Shannon, David. No, David! . New York: Blue Sky Press, 1998. Print.
  • Smith, Robin. "David Gets in Trouble." Horn Book Magazine 79.1 (2003): 61-62. Literary Reference Center. EBSCO. Web. 8 July 2011.
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