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Who is your hero? What is your greatest interest? What was the highlight of your summer? PowerPoint Presentation
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Who is your hero? What is your greatest interest? What was the highlight of your summer?. 3.45 hours = __________seconds 8,480 Gigameters = ___________ meters 18.4 miles/hour = ____________ meters/second 25 milligrams = ____________ kilograms.

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Presentation Transcript
slide2

Who is your hero?

  • What is your greatest interest?
  • What was the highlight of your summer?
slide4

3.45 hours = __________seconds

8,480 Gigameters = ___________ meters

18.4 miles/hour = ____________ meters/second

25 milligrams = ____________ kilograms

slide6
Use the equation we deduced from yesterdays data and graph to calculate the flight time of objects dropped from each of the heights below

20 meters _____________

40 meters _____________

100 meters _____________

0.1 meter _____________

6.0 feet ______________

8 mile ______________

slide13

A dragracer accelerates from rest for 3 seconds at 30m/s²

  • Then travels at a constant velocity for 2 seconds.
  • Finally, is slowed by its parachute to a stop in the next 5 seconds.
you have 15 grams of clay
You have 15 grams of clay.
  • Shape the clay into a cube and determine its volume.
  • With the clay as a cube, determine it’s density.
  • How many grams would it take to build 1 cubic centimeter of clay.
  • Shape the entire hunk of clay into a sphere and determine its volume.
  • With the clay as a sphere, determine it’d density.
  • Shape or roll the clay into a round patty of uniform thickness and as large a diameter as possible. Determine the thickness or height of this cylinder
slide17

At low tide, the deck of the Sidney Lanier Bridge is 65m above the surface of the river below. Calculate the flight time of each of the stones described.

Stone 1 is dropped straight down from the deck of the bridge and lands in the water.

Stone 2 is thrown straight up with a speed of 25m/s and is caught at the same height from which it is thrown.

Stone 3 is also thrown straight up at 25m/s but misses the bridge deck and falls to the water.

Stone 4 is thrown downward from the bridge deck at a speed of 25m/s and lands in the water.

Write a mathematical expression to determine the tide height based upon the time it takes a stone to fall from the bridge deck.

slide21

A paper airplane is thrown horizontal from the rooftop travelling at a constant forward velocity of 4 m/s @15⁰ below horizontal. During the 9.5 seconds it is airborne, it is also blown sideways off course a total distance of 12m

  • 1. A sketch might be helpful
  • 2. How high was the building?
  • 3. How far from the wall of the building did it travel?
  • 4. What is its average velocity for the flight?
  • 5. What are the three components of its average velocity?
tie a string loop around your physics book and use spring scales to measure the following
Tie a string loop around your physics book and use spring scales to measure the following.
  • What is the weight of your book?
  • What is the normal force on your book when resting on your desktop?
  • What is the maximum force of static friction between your book and desktop?
  • What is the force of kinetic friction between your book and desktop?
  • What are both coefficients of friction?
slide48

How are forces described and measured.

  • How are forces added together ( arithmetically, tip to tail, right angle method, component method)
  • How are forces and their components represented on a free body diagram (especially on an incline)
  • How is Newton’s second law used to predict an object’s acceleration.
  • How are mass and weight related by Newton’s 2nd
  • What do the 1st and 3rd Laws really mean.
  • How do we predict sliding friction (static and kinetic)
  • How do we predict tension forces on a moving Atwood machine?
  • How do we predict spring forces and measure spring constants?
  • How do we calculate and add torque forces?
slide58

If I am lifting a book from the flloor…

am I doing work on the book?

does the book have energy?

If I am holding a book stationary in front of me?

am I doing work on the book?

does the book have energy?

If a book is just sitting on the floor….

is the floor doing work on the book?

does the book have energy?

slide66
Our moon has a mass of 7.4 x 10²² kg and orbits the Earth every 27.3 days at an average distance of 380,000km

T =

f =

C =

v =

ω =

ac =

Fc=

What changes if the moon is twice as far away?

slide79

How high must one go to reach ½ atmosphere of air pressure?

  • A commercial airline cruises above 30,000ft. What is the outside air pressure in PSI at this altitude?