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Greece. March. Warm-up, Monday, March 3. It looks _______________, therefore, people there probably ________. Vocab , Monday, March 3. An area of land nearly surrounded by water A long poem that tells a story A high, rocky hill where early people built cities

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Greece


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    1. Greece March

    2. Warm-up, Monday, March 3 It looks _______________, therefore, people there probably ________.

    3. Vocab, Monday, March 3 • An area of land nearly surrounded by water • A long poem that tells a story • A high, rocky hill where early people built cities • A city with its own traditions, government, and laws; both a city and a separate independent state • peninsula • epic • acropolis • city-state

    4. Vocab, Monday, March 3 • aristocrat • tyrant • democracy A member of a rich and powerful family A ruler who takes power with the support of the middle and working classes A form of government in which citizens govern themselves

    5. Warm-up for Tuesday, March 3 Describe the painting. Strive for five: at least 5 complete sentences!

    6. Warm-up for Friday, March 7 • Answer in complete sentences! • Why did the Greek city-states each develop their own laws and traditions? • What things did the Greek city-states have in common?

    7. Where…? What…? Where, really?

    8. Where…? What…? Where, really?

    9. Warm-up for Monday, March 10 • tribute • immortal • oracle • A payment made by a less powerful state or nation to a more powerful one • Someone or something that lives forever • In ancient Greece, a sacred site used to consult a god or goddess; any priest or priestess who spoke for the gods

    10. More for Monday, March 10! • philosopher • tragedy • Someone who used reason to understand the world; in Greece the earliest philosophers used reason to explain natural events • A type of serious drama that ends in disaster for the main character

    11. Warm-up for Tuesday, March 11 • Write the complete sentence in your notebook, filling in the blank with the appropriate vocab word. • Socrates was an important ___________ whose most important lesson was “Know thyself.” • Greek gods had many human characteristics, but unlike humans, they were __________. • A ___________ is a serious story that usually ends in disaster for the main character.

    12. Warm-up for Wednesday, March 12 • Read the following questions. Be prepared to answer them after the video. • Why weren't women allowed to compete in the Olympics? When was the first women allowed to compete in the Olympics? • Why doesn't Sam go to Greece with Samantha and Fred? What happens to him at the diner? • How did Samantha win the discus throw? • Who is Plato? Why is Plato his nickname? • How does Samantha trick Simplex?

    13. After the video: Exit ticket • Why weren't women allowed to compete in the Olympics? When was the first women allowed to compete in the Olympics? • Why doesn't Sam go to Greece with Samantha and Fred? What happens to him at the diner?

    14. After the video: Exit ticket • How did Samantha win the discus throw? • Who is Plato? Why is Plato his nickname? • How does Samantha trick Simplex?

    15. Warm-up for Thursday, March 13 • In your social studies notebook, answer the following questions in complete sentences. STRIVE FOR FIVE—at least five sentences! • If you were a Greek god or goddess, what would you be the god or goddess of? • What would your patron city be like?

    16. Working with your fellow citizens • Read the information about your city and its patron god or goddess. • Discuss with your fellow citizens the characteristics of your city and god/dess. • Brainstorm. • What would your city’s mascot be? • What would your flag look like? • What kind of ideals does our city have—what kind of people do we strive to be?

    17. Each city-state must have… 1. A mascot 2. A flag 3. A written explanation of how the mascot and flag represent the city 4. An anthem 5. A statement to read aloud at the Opening Ceremony • THESE FIVE ITEMS ARE DUE TOMORROW (FRIDAY) • Your name and your city-state’s name must be on your item

    18. Warm-up • Choose 4 vocab words and use each in a COMPLETE sentence.

    19. Warm-up for Monday, March 17 • Write the question and your answer in complete sentences in your social studies notebook. • Plato said “Necessity is the mother of invention.” What do you think that means?

    20. Jigsaw Activity • When I tell you, you will get together with your city-state group. • I will assign you a new group, with citizens of other city-states. • You will teach each other and learn about the other city-states.

    21. Jigsaw Activity • Teach each other the answers to the following questions about your city-state. Record the answers in your social studies notebook. • What was your city-state famous for? • What was your city-state’s patron god or goddess? What was he or she (or they) god(s) of? • Why do you think the people of that city-state chose that god or goddess to be special to them?

    22. Warm-up for Tuesday, March 18 • In your social studies notebook, answer these questions in COMPLETE SENTENCES. • How were our Olympic Games different from the ancient Greek ones? • How are the modern Olympic Games different from the ancient Greek ones?

    23. How does this plate reflect the goals of Greek art?

    24. Warm-up for Wednesday, March 18 • Five minutes of silent review for the quiz.

    25. Warm-up for Thursday, March 20 • Some questions on standardized tests ask you to analyze an outline. Copy the outline into your notes. • Solon’s Reforms • Outlawed slavery based on debt • Opened high office to more citizens • _________ • Gave the assembly more power • Limited Rights • Allowed only male citizens to participate • Restricted citizenship • Left many slaves without rights

    26. Warm-up Part II • Which of the following belongs in I-C? • Later reforms under another ruler • Allowed male citizens to debate important laws • Life in Athens • Did not allow women to share in public life Think it through: This outline is organized by major topics and subtopics. The questions asks you to find a subtopic under Solon’s Reforms. Answer C is too general; it could be the subject of an entire outline. Answer A is also general; it could be the subject of another topic in this outline. Answer D does not fit under Solon’s Reforms. The key word “reforms” means “changes” or “improvements”. Therefore, answer B is correct.

    27. Warm-up for Friday, March 21 Write three sentences describing this statue and who you think it might be (what kind of person or goddess). Who are they and what are they doing? What adjectives describe this picture? Strive for Five!

    28. Warm-up for Monday, March 24 Write the question and your answer in your social studies notebook. • Why did the ancient Greeks think of their communities as separate countries? • A different language was spoken in each community. • Each community’s people came from a different country. • Each community practiced a different religion. • Geographical features cut communities off from one another.

    29. Vocab for March 24 A city-state in ancient Greece; the capital of modern-day Greece A public market and meeting-place in an ancient Greek city; the Agora, spelled with a capital A, refers to the agora of Athens A seller of goods The condition of being owned by, and forced to work for, someone else • Athens • agora • vendor • slavery

    30. Daily Life in Athens • What was public life in Athens like? Public life in Athens was male-dominated. Men were active in politics and society. Women were not. The Acropolis was the center of religious life. The Agora was the center of all other public life.

    31. Daily Life in Athens The Agora of Athens was an open-air market. It was open all year because of Greece’s mild climate. It was the busiest and most interesting of all the agoras in Greece. The streets were lined with shops. Farmers and artisans had stands set up under shady trees. Buyers and vendors haggled for the best prices. • What was the Agora like?

    32. Daily Life in Athens Food, sheep’s wool, pottery, hardware, cloth, books, and many other things were for sale. Men gathered in the Agora to talk about politics, philosophy, or events in their community. • What was the Agora like? (continued)

    33. The ruins of the Agora What it might have looked like

    34. Daily Life in Athens Temples and government buildings lined the Agora. They were beautiful structures, because the Athenians admired beauty in architecture. Many government buildings in Europe and the United States were patterned after Greek architecture.

    35. Daily Life in Athens • What about private life? Houses were very plain and made of mud bricks. The rooms were centered around a courtyard that was hidden from the street. The courtyards were the center of family life, but the houses also had a kitchen, storerooms, a dining room, and bedrooms.

    36. Daily Life in Athens • What did Athenians eat? They ate simple foods. Breakfast might be just bread. Lunch might be cheese, olives, and bread. Dinner would be fish and vegetables, followed by cheese, fruit, and honeyed cakes. They ate very little meat other than fish.

    37. Warm-up for Tuesday, March 25 • Write the question and your answer in your social studies notebook. • Why do you think so many US government buildings resemble ancient Greek architecture?

    38. Greek Revival

    39. Daily Life in Athens • They led secluded lives. Secluded means sheltered, withdrawn, away from the public. • Men thought women needed to be protected from the public eye and guided by the opinions of men. • Women had far less freedom than men. They could not: • take part in politics • vote • own property • They could • be priestesses • run the home and family • What was life like for women?

    40. Daily Life in Athens • In some wealthy families, men and women had completely separate quarters. • Women • Spun and wove cloth • Looked after supplies of food and wine • Cared for young children • Kept track of the family finances • If the family had slaves, they were the woman’s responsibility. • Women in poor families often worked outside the home, making pottery, tending sheep, or manufacturing cloth. • What was life like for women? (continued)

    41. Daily Life in Athens • “The greatest glory belongs to the woman who is least talked about by men, whether they praise her or find fault with her.” –Pericles • Women did important work, but they were expected to be invisible.

    42. Exit ticket for March 25 • Name two ways in which the lives of Athenian men and women were similar. Name two ways in which they were different.

    43. Warm-up for Wednesday, March 26 Write the questions and your answers in your social studies notebook. • What activities took place in the Agora of Athens? • What does the Agora tell us about the culture of Athens? • Describe the home life of the Athenians. (At least 3 sentences)

    44. Daily Life in Athens Slavery was common in Athens. As much as ONE THIRD of the population of Athens were slaves. Slaves were usually POWs, captured in war or by pirates while traveling on ships. Children born into slave families automatically became slaves. Some Greeks were uncomfortable owning other Greeks… so they bought foreigners as slaves. • What about slaves?

    45. Daily Life in Athens Slaves did not have any of the privileges free Greeks were used to. Of course slaves were not citizens. They had no political rights or personal freedom. They received no formal education. Slaves could become free only if they bought their own freedom or if their master freed them. • What was a slave’s life like?

    46. Daily Life in Athens • Slaves did many kinds of work: • Farm work • Mining for silver and other metals • Artisan’s assistant (making pottery, etc.) • Construction work • Forging weapons and armor • Cooking and serving food • Tending children • Cleaning • Weaving cloth • What was a slave’s life like?

    47. Daily Life in Athens Most Greek households could not have operated without slaves! Ancient Greece ran on slave labor. Without the slaves’ hard work, Greek citizens (aka men) could not have had the leisure to participate in government and the arts. In this way, slaves contributed to the development of democracy and the arts. • What was a slave’s life like?

    48. Summary Questions Q: What were the responsibilities of men compared to the those of women in ancient Athens? A. Men conducted business in public, while women ran the households. Q. What conclusions can we make about society in ancient Athens? A; Men and women lived almost separate lives. Democracy applied only to men.

    49. Summary Questions Q; Describe the various roles of slaves in Athens and of those in the rest of ancient Greece. A; Slaves provided labor on farms, in mines, in artisan’s shops, and in households. Q: Free people rarely questioned slavery in ancient Greece. Why do you think this was so?