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Holding Teams Accountable: A Delicate Dance of Nudge Nurture

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    2. The Four Oaks Story Key Questions How do you make rapid improvements with little funding? How do you manage teams toward success? How do you craft a willingness to work harder and smarter for whole school reform?

    3. Participant Outcomes Experience strategies to engage students, parents, and staff toward school reform. Be exposed to research to support necessary changes in a high-poverty schoolor any school.

    4. The Four Oaks Story 56% - 60% poverty 1033 students (campus designed for 650) 150 + Students With Disabilities (Hub for BED programs) 203 ESL/Hispanic Students White flight 23 mobile classrooms Rapid growth, high teacher turnover

    5. What We Became Gifted and Talented Theme School NC Honor School of Excellence AYP 90.2% Proficiency Zero Out-of-School Suspensions NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey

    6. Safe and Orderly Results

    7. How did we engage students, parents, and staff in whole school reform?

    8. The First Private Step - Strategies Beliefs about our students and learning Mental Mindsets Research on successful leadership, learning, motivation Philosophical discussion Our first step Beliefs Remove Cant be done! from our beliefs Mental mindsets Remove competition with affluent schools from our mental models. Use research to guide our journey Our new questions - What can we be the best at? What will it take to get us there? Research on successful leadershipcharismatic leaders and superstar teachers not required to build a great school. Philosophical discussions NCLB, if we believe in life in a free country, we can change what goes on behind the classroom door. Our first step Beliefs Remove Cant be done! from our beliefs Mental mindsets Remove competition with affluent schools from our mental models. Use research to guide our journey Our new questions - What can we be the best at? What will it take to get us there? Research on successful leadershipcharismatic leaders and superstar teachers not required to build a great school. Philosophical discussions NCLB, if we believe in life in a free country, we can change what goes on behind the classroom door.

    9. The First Public Step - Strategies Honest conversations Why Change? What do we want our school to becomevision? Identified School Successes and Areas for Improvementno knee-jerk reactions Continuing Community Dialogue 5 years of major site changes, renovations, building projects, rapid growth, 23 mobile classrooms, and teachers packing to move year after year Created stress, safety issues, and teacher turnover. I had used every excuse. I was disappointed in Myself. After a serious review of research, findings were shared with teachers and parents. School teams attended conferences, read and talked about Marzanos meta-analysis of what works in schools, And studied Bill Daggetts Vision of the future. Assessed teacher passions and student interests, 5 years of major site changes, renovations, building projects, rapid growth, 23 mobile classrooms, and teachers packing to move year after year Created stress, safety issues, and teacher turnover. I had used every excuse. I was disappointed in Myself. After a serious review of research, findings were shared with teachers and parents. School teams attended conferences, read and talked about Marzanos meta-analysis of what works in schools, And studied Bill Daggetts Vision of the future. Assessed teacher passions and student interests,

    10. Strategies to Create School Improvement Plan and Buy-In YEARLONG PROCESS Gathering Customer Feedback & PDSA Complete Consensus acknowledged levels of participation Complete Consensus - YEARLONG PROCESS Gathering Customer Feedback & PDSA Monthly Parent Advisory Council Meetings Monthly School Improvement Meetings P.T.A. Information sessions Faculty Meetings dialogue, reflection Mid Year and End of Year Think Tanks Weekly Grade Level Team Meetings Monthly Classified Staff Meetings Weekly Student Meetings Complete Consensus - YEARLONG PROCESS Gathering Customer Feedback & PDSA Monthly Parent Advisory Council Meetings Monthly School Improvement Meetings P.T.A. Information sessions Faculty Meetings dialogue, reflection Mid Year and End of Year Think Tanks Weekly Grade Level Team Meetings Monthly Classified Staff Meetings Weekly Student Meetings

    11. Strategies - School Improvement Planning Process Whole Staff - Generate feedback Instructional Teams Analyze and report Whole Staff - Build consensus Processes - Affinity Diagrams, Force Field Analyses, Blueslipping, Voting Faculty whole faculty, instructional teams, SIT PTA whole group, table work, report out, light voting, affinity diagrams, Faculty whole faculty, instructional teams, SIT PTA whole group, table work, report out, light voting, affinity diagrams,

    12. Strategies - Leadership Listens to the Voice of Customers to Determine Aim Surveyed Students- What Would You Love to Learn if the Teachers Could Teach Anything? Surveyed Teachers - If You Could Teach Your Passion, What Would it Be? Faculty Affinity Parent Meeting Would You Be Interested in a Theme School and What would it Look Like?

    13. Strategies - Start Broad and Narrow the Focus Leaders: Begin with the End in Mind Vision for Success Build a Culture of Continuous Improvement Resources to Remove Barriers for ALL Involvedchocolate and retail therapy In God We Trust, Everyone Else Bring Data to Make Decisions (Budget, Staff Development, CRS, etc.)

    14. Strategies Articulated Shared Vision Gifted and Talented Theme School Electives Interest Based Master Schedule Problem Based Learning Science/SS Covey for Kids Character Ed Safe and Orderly

    15. Our Vision We want to be our Personal Best in all that we do. It is our vision that all students, make or exceed adequate yearly growth in academics each year. We envision a safe, orderly, and clean school where students, parents, and staff are motivated to create a learning environment in which we can live and learn without fear of bullying, harassment, prejudice, gossip, cultural misunderstandings, or unsafe conditions.

    16. Mission/Aim Determined Four Oaks is a Total Quality Gifted & Talented Theme School. It is our highest priority that our students develop their full potential, be able to participate in and sustain a free and democratic America. We accept the challenges of an emerging, global, and culturally inclusive society as we commit ourselves to work with parents to continuously improve the learning, motivation, safety, and leadership of our young people.

    17. What do we want? Unprecedented levels of achievement - 100% students making AYP Rigorous, relevant learning Quadrant D Increased Academic Learning Time engaged learners More effective responses to discipline and student needs Electives Core academics + stretch learning More effective ESL and SWD services and programs Good citizens With our Aim in mindwe were able to decide WHAT we wanted our school to look llike. With our Aim in mindwe were able to decide WHAT we wanted our school to look llike.

    18. How could we make rapid improvements with existing resources without messing up a good school? Strategies Research Create leaders at all levels Redirect existing resources (prioritize) Provide faculty with Calendar and schedule for an entire year Inside the classroom Research Change, organizational development, instruction and learning, motivation, achievement, adult learning Create leaders at all levels - teachers, students, parents Redirect existing resources (prioritize) Calendar and schedule for upcoming yearInside the classroom Research Change, organizational development, instruction and learning, motivation, achievement, adult learning Create leaders at all levels - teachers, students, parents Redirect existing resources (prioritize) Calendar and schedule for upcoming year

    19. How do you craft a willingness to work harder and smarter for whole school reform? Strategy Understand Research Create a shared sense of urgency and rationale for change Dr. Daggett Motivation Richard Sagor, ASDC Organizational development Change Instruction International Center, Marzano, ASCD Learning International Center, ASCD, Payne, NSDC Got to understand research up front!!!! These are the behaviors, mindsets, beliefs, attitudes which will shape the culture and learning inside your classrooms.Got to understand research up front!!!! These are the behaviors, mindsets, beliefs, attitudes which will shape the culture and learning inside your classrooms.

    20. Crafting Motivation and Willingness Motivating Students and Teachers in an Era of Standards by Richard Sagor, ASCD

    21. To be motivated and willing, people need to feel satisfied in the areas of Competence, Belonging, Usefulness, Potency, and Optimism. Motivating Students and Teachers in an Era of Standards by Richard Sagor

    22. Its Important to Know, As Teachers and Principals, How Much Power We Have on Student Learning if we Collaborate about Individual Students

    23. School & Teacher Effectiveness on Student Achievement After 2 yrs. (Robert Marzano, What Works in Schools) The power of what we believe about instruction, students, and learning can be seen in this chart. I shared it with teachersjust so they would know. We could not leave a single teacher behind.The power of what we believe about instruction, students, and learning can be seen in this chart. I shared it with teachersjust so they would know. We could not leave a single teacher behind.

    24. Cumulative Effects over 3 Years Between Students with Least Effective vs. Most Effective Teachers (Robert Marzano, What Works in Schools)

    25. Motivating Students and Teachers in an Era of Standards by Richard Sagor Figure 1.1. Satisfying Basic Needs to Build Optimism

    26. Research on How to Develop Our School through Whole School Reform Models of Change Organizational Development Cultural Change Adult Learners

    27. We looked at our own school systems model for change and the International Center for Leadership in Education.We looked at our own school systems model for change and the International Center for Leadership in Education.

    28. International Center Model of Change Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education The Centers model of change is simple, understandable, and doable.The Centers model of change is simple, understandable, and doable.

    29. WHY and HOW of Change? We used Dr. Daggetts research and resources Dr. Willard Daggett, International Center for Leadership in Education, Model Schools Conference Successful Practices Network Global perspectivewe made it personal for our students. Learning Criteria for the 21st Century Personal Skills Development Lesson design, standards, professional development Quadrant D Lesson Design Rigor, Relevance, Relationships

    30. Why? China - 60% Bachelors degrees in science and engineering America - 5% were in science/engineering 2005 China graduated 350,000 engineers 2010 predicted that 90 percent of worlds scientists & engineers will be in Asia Nearly one-half all science, tech., engineering, math students are non-U.S. citizens Dr. Willard Daggett, Model Schools Conference, 2005 We are at a great disadvantage as a nation. We are at a great disadvantage as a nation.

    31. What kind of education will our students need? How do we compete with China and India?

    32. Examples of Info used with Parents & Community We used these tools to build rationale for change with our fire department, churches, students, chamber of commerce.We used these tools to build rationale for change with our fire department, churches, students, chamber of commerce.

    35. What needs to change? What do we believe about students, learning, and a future that is unknown?

    36. Challenges Globalization Demographics Values / Beliefs Technology Dr. Willard Daggett, International Center for Leadership in Education

    37. HOW .Sharing Data Beginning of Community (Rick & Becky DuFour, High Five Professional Learning Communities Conference, Raleigh, NC Jan., 2006) Collecting data is on the first step toward wisdom, but sharing data is the first step toward community. - Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

    38. How do you manage teams toward success? ReframeHow do you grow teams toward success? Vision Ongoing dialogue Clear understanding of standards Data on individual and groups of students Rigorous, relevant lessons built around student data Data conferences Bridge..Support SHARED.vision, dialogue, understanding, common language, data, lessons, SHARED.vision, dialogue, understanding, common language, data, lessons,

    39. How do you manage teams toward success? Use Data.the right kind that can be benchmarked and monitored about individual students and groups of students Adult Learning Theory -NSDC

    41. Research Change Models Understanding the change process Motivation for students and staff to build synergy Why, What, and How of whole school reform Marzano Daggett, ICLE National Staff Development Council, ASCD

    42. What Works in Schools: Translating Research into Action by Robert Marzano Background Knowledge Mentoring Different Teachers and Multi-age Grouping Vocabulary-Improved Crystallized Intelligence Motivation Drives Rigor, Success, and Improved Discipline

    43. From these ResultsPDSA We Aligned Goals & Strategies Key Works Processes Information Systems with research Human Resources

    44. Goal 1 - Strategies to Improve Achievement Literacy - 3 yr. Comprehensive Writing Problem Based Learning/Quadrant D integrating core areas science, social studies, science kits Electives-Stretch Learning with Rigor and Relevance Personal Skills Development Program - goal setting, strategizing, reflection and personal improvement Covey for Kids adapted from S. Coveys Seven Habits

    45. Goal 1 - Key Works Processes to Improve Achievement Faculty Meeting changes Weekly Instructional Team Meetings to PDSA data, classroom management, training implementation, needs Curriculum Development Days rotating subs Adult Learning Lab

    46. Goal 2 - Strategies for Safe, Orderly Learning Environment Address Gossip Build trust among staff and within the community address concerns School wide Discipline Plan PEACE Center to replace ISS Parent involvement Re-Structured Recess to reduce conflicts/accidents

    47. Goal 3 - Parent Involvement Strategies Parent Information and Communication in English and Spanish without fail PTA Innovations Information, traditional, fundraising, student/parent interactions, Portfolio Conferences Translate all communication for Spanish speaking families during PTA, sometimes concurrent sessions Provide Spanish library books for ESL students to share with parents Food, Student Performances, Artists-in-Residence for students while parents participated in training/information sessions

    48. PDSA Parent Involvement Results 100% Accountability and Code of Conduct Agreements signed (whew!) Annual Title I Meeting Oct.27th.700 parents and students

    49. Goal 4 Strategies for Intervention, Remediation, and Acceleration Adjust student selection process for ESL & SWD classrooms as well as services Student Data Analysis and Goal Setting Remediation & Acceleration Electives for math and reading using on-grade skilled teacher & focused materials Technology

    50. What needed to change? Go beyond Core Academic Learning Personal skill development and habits of mind for student and adult learners Use of data on individual students and groups of students Lesson plans.Quadrant D.problem based Student engagement.academic learning time Adult learning Motivation and synergy

    51. Teams Visits to several schools Group reflection Hopes Teams (parents & teachers) visited other schools. We processed our observations through group reflection and networking within the school. Surveyed Teacher passions Student interests We built our hopes and dreams with optimism and research! Teams (parents & teachers) visited other schools. We processed our observations through group reflection and networking within the school. Surveyed Teacher passions Student interests We built our hopes and dreams with optimism and research!

    52. How did we change? Adult Learning Lab Data conferences Rigorous, relevant, curriculum Planning and lesson development Literacy - Reading Across Content Areas Leadership Development

    53. Key to Improved Results (Rick & Becky DuFour, High Five Professional Learning Communities Conference, Raleigh, NC Jan., 2006) Powerful, proven structures for improved results already existThey begin when a group of teachers meet regularly as a team to identify essential and valued student learning, develop common formative assessments, analyze current levels of achievement, set achievement goals, and then share and create lessons and strategies to improve upon those levels. - Mike Schmoker, 2005

    54. Michael Fullan (Rick & Becky DuFour, High Five Professional Learning Communities Conference, Raleigh, NC Jan., 2006) Assessment for learning, when done well, is one of the most powerful, high-leverage strategies for improving student learning that we know of. Educators collectively become more skilled and focused at assessing, disaggregating, and using student achievement as a tool for ongoing improvement.

    55. Research Overview

    56. Research on School Culture Teacher Perceptions of Change (Baker, Cathy Evans Truitt 1992) Developmental Changes in School Culture

    57. School Culture (Deal and Kennedy; Peters and Waterman) Creates solidarity & meaning Inspires commitment, productivity ORit actively works in a negative way

    58. Creating a School to Meet Todays Challenges Understand the process of cultural change Recognize that change will result in loss of existing cultural patterns ORwe may not be able to learn how to create the school we want and need.

    59. Schools Must Attend to Transition Issues (Deal, 1990) If schools do not find ways of moving effectively through the rough waters of changemost will either become stuck in an unworkable past or mired in a meaningless presentcaught in the double bind of hanging on while letting go.

    60. Those who manage change Need to learn to dance, to become healers capable of releasing collective energy to heal the wounds of changeTo lose heart is to lose confidence and meaningfor manythe rapid pace of change has torn the heart out of schools. Heart will not be restored by knowledge; it can only be restored by dancing and healing (Deal, 1990)

    61. Mental Framework for Successful Change (Hord & Hall, 1987) Change is perceived differently by outsiders and participants Understanding the dynamics of change as it occurs is essential

    62. Stages of Concern 0 Awareness Stage Informational Stage Personal Stage Management Stage Consequence Stage Collaboration Stage Refocusing Stage Awareness - Unworried about self Informational - Interested in substantive nature of the change Personal Stage - Uncertain about demands of change, personal ability to meet demands, and personal role in the change Personal role in relation to rewards (i.e., financial or status, decision making, potential conflicts, personal commitment Attention focused on processes, tasks, information, resources related to change Management - Issues related to efficiency, organizing, managing, scheduling, and time are utmost Consequence - Attention focused on impact of change on students, its relevance to students, and its impact on student learning Focus is on coordination and cooperation with others about the change Focus is on exploration of benefits from the change and further improvements. Individual has definite ideas about alternatives. Awareness - Unworried about self Informational - Interested in substantive nature of the change Personal Stage - Uncertain about demands of change, personal ability to meet demands, and personal role in the change Personal role in relation to rewards (i.e., financial or status, decision making, potential conflicts, personal commitment Attention focused on processes, tasks, information, resources related to change Management - Issues related to efficiency, organizing, managing, scheduling, and time are utmost Consequence - Attention focused on impact of change on students, its relevance to students, and its impact on student learning Focus is on coordination and cooperation with others about the change Focus is on exploration of benefits from the change and further improvements. Individual has definite ideas about alternatives.

    63. If the Change is appropriate Concerns change over time in a developmental manner Teacher needs for intense informational and personal concerns require a particular type and quantity of information Teachers with high informational concerns do not want massive detail and a bombardment of information.

    64. When Personal Concerns are Intense More Face-to-face contact Informal visits Encouragement

    65. Research saysduring early implementation, teachers need How to do it training sessions Frequent opportunities to ask questions and receive help

    66. Research Says Hord & Hall Arousal of Impact Concerns at all three stages rests largely upon the priorities and actions taken by the principal. If emphasis is not placed on what happens with learners and good teaching is not encouraged and supported, it is very difficult for teachers by themselves to develop and maintain student impact concerns.

    67. Collaboration Concerns Generally requires encouragement from the principal in the form of sanctions and support TIME

    68. Principals do not facilitate change by themselves Second change facilitator in every case, assistant principal, lead teacher, curriculum coach

    69. The Big AHA The importance of teachers as leaders and other change facilitators holds critical implications for planning, training, and facilitating the change process Why?

    70. In conclusion. Improving Student Achievement through Whole School ReformRethink and Reinvent What did Four Oaks rethink and reinvent? Instructional programs Discipline Habits of successful people Student & teacher motivation Opportunity gaps for high poverty students No Teacher Left Behind Rethink and reinvent Instructional programs Delivery of services to students with disabilities, ESL students, At-Risk students, and underachieving academically gifted students. Discipline Habits of successful people Student Motivation Opportunity Gaps for High Poverty Students Rethink and reinvent Instructional programs Delivery of services to students with disabilities, ESL students, At-Risk students, and underachieving academically gifted students. Discipline Habits of successful people Student Motivation Opportunity Gaps for High Poverty Students

    71. SummaryAdult Learning Lab Coach Second change facilitator to help teachers changeBehind the classroom door Time Curriculum Development to ensure rigor, relevance (rotating subs) Resources Data conferences Individual and groups of teachers with coach and principal (initially)

    72. Aligned Reform Initiatives into One Whole School Reform EffortOurs Integrated 5 required plans: School Improvement Plan CSR Plan Title I Plan Safe Schools Plan Other School Plans

    73. Created Leadership at all Levels and Worked for Complete Consensus Leadership and Customers ESL Coach/teacher leader SWD Coach/teacher leader Curriculum coach/teacher leaders

    74. Leadership Listened and Communicated the Vision, Goals, and Results Over and Over and Over. Data Analysis Conferences Jr. TQE Team Meetings School Improvement Team Meetings Weekly Team Meetings Parent Information Meetings (Fall/Spring) Quarterly Faculty Meetings

    75. Information Systems Used to Develop Voice of Customer Filters A Vision of the Future ICLE Model Schools Conference Professional Expertise International Center for Leadership in Education DPI Standard Course of Study School Visits Research: Marzano, Richard Sagor, etc.

    76. Leadership Listens and Communicates the Aim, Goals, and Results Constancy of Purpose & PDSA Faculty Vote Cross categorical groups to determine direction for next year (Blueslipping) Mid Year Think Tanks (6 groups-cross categorical grouping)-Process Checks on School Improvement Plan Implementation End of Year Think Tank Parent Advisory Council Meetings Faculty Vote Cross categorical groups to determine direction for next year (Blueslipping) Mid Year Think Tanks (6 groups-cross categorical grouping)-Process Checks on School Improvement Plan Implementation End of Year Think Tank Parent Advisory Council Meetings Faculty Vote Cross categorical groups to determine direction for next year (Blueslipping) Mid Year Think Tanks (6 groups-cross categorical grouping)-Process Checks on School Improvement Plan Implementation End of Year Think Tank Parent Advisory Council Meetings

    77. Human Resources Recognition and Support Release Planning Time with Coach Portfolio Parties Data Conferences Peer Coaching Cookies, Chocolate, Kleenex Faculty Meetings Celebrations of great practices PTA breakfasts, massages, PTA cakes, Duty Free Lunch, etc.

    78. Process for Data Analysis Data Conferences with teachers, coach, principal Portfolio Parties Curriculum Planning Days rotating subs

    79. Personal Skill Development for Students and Parents Communicates the Aim Develops Buy In for the Aim Develops leadership at all levels of the organization Develops synergy, energy, and motivation for continuous improvement with all Coveys 7 Habits for Parents, staff, and students Center has an excellent new Personal Skill Development Program..take a look at itCoveys 7 Habits for Parents, staff, and students Center has an excellent new Personal Skill Development Program..take a look at it

    80. New Focus Academic Learning Time What are students DOING to demonstrate success with learning objectives? Can every student tell the learning objective? What is the teacher DOING to Cause the observable success of each child? ALT Daily Walk-thrus Not a getcha game Provides immediate feedback as related to measurable goals Embedded coaching feedback ALT Daily Walk-thrus Not a getcha game Provides immediate feedback as related to measurable goals Embedded coaching feedback

    81. How we created Accountability Phonological Awareness Skill Test Literacy First Phonics Assessment Spelling Assessment Oral Reading Fluency Assessment Advanced Decoding Assessment grades 3-5 Lexiles, Quantiles (new) K-5 Quarterly Math Assessment Data (local) 3-5 STAR, AR, SRI, Orchard Results 3-5 Quarterly Reading Assessment Data Common Assessments Quarterly Data Conferences Student Portfolios- Graphs, Reflections, Action Plans, Goals Principals, coaches, teachers, students, parentsPrincipals, coaches, teachers, students, parents

    82. Monitoring Writing Assessments Standardized state tests Parent, Staff, and Student Surveys Monthly SIT Meetings Weekly Team and Literacy Meetings Mid Year and End of Year Think Tanks with SIT to Assess SIP Implementation (Rosters, Minutes, Blueslipping, Plus/Deltas, etc.)

    83. Monitoring. Accident Reports Jr. TQE Monthly Meeting Plus/Deltas Office Referrals for Discipline PEACE Referrals Out of School Suspensions

    84. PDSA Results throughout the Year Parent Involvement Signed Weekly Conduct Reports Quarterly Portfolio Party Attendance Log Signed Accountability Compacts Parent Surveys Parent Advisory Council Plus/Deltas PTA Parent Information Sessions Rosters and Survey Results Parent Volunteer Participation Log Parent Orientation Rosters PEP, MAP, AIG Conference Rosters

    85. PDSA Results throughout the Year Rosters for training Being Our Personal Best Student Reflections Strategize for Success (Character Ed) Student Evaluations Weekly Class Meeting Plus/Deltas Building Maintenance Log

    86. What Changed? 1st Dialogue and clarity 2nd Shared vision, consensus, leadership, trust 3rd Support for teachers in the invention of work that was challenging, engaging, useful, and effective in promoting student growth 4th Learning

    87. Roundtable at 2:15 in the Brittany Cathy Evans Truitt, Ph.D. wctruitt@bellsouth.net CathyTruitt@johnston.k12.nc.us Home Office 919-779-7012 Cell 971-5104

    88. International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc. 1587 Route 146 Rexford, NY 12148 Phone (518) 399-2776 Fax (518) 399-7607 E-mail - info@LeaderEd.com www.LeaderEd.com