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  1. UNIT 3, Part 1 The Energy of the Everyday Click the mouse button or press the space bar to continue

  2. Unit 3, Part 1 MAIN MENU The Energy of the Everyday (pages 530–555) Click a selection title to go to the corresponding selection menu.

  3. SELECTION MENU Selection Menu (pages 530–534) Before You Read Reading the Selection After You Read Vocabulary Workshop

  4. BEFORE YOU READ Meet Robert Hayden Click the picture to learn about the author.

  5. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poem In this poem, you meet a son remembering his father. In his recollection, the son gains a newfound understanding of his father’s love. Before you read the poem, think about the questions on the following slide.

  6. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poem • How often do you reflect on what your parents or family members do to show their love for you? • How do you interpret and respond to their everyday gestures and manners?

  7. BEFORE YOU READ Building Background Poet and teacher Robert Hayden dedicated his life to his craft and to working “closely with young people” in order “to encourage creative writing.” He researched and celebrated his heritage in his poetry. Hayden said, “I believe in the essential oneness of all people,” and his poems portray universal human concerns of loss and love. Hayden won many awards for his work and was the first African American to be named as the Library of Congress consultant in poetry, a position now called poet laureate.

  8. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading The Energy of the Everyday As you read this poem, notice how Hayden captures the different moods and actions of his characters through vivid imagery.

  9. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading Line and Stanza A line in a poem usually consists of a single word or row of words. A stanza is a group of lines forming a unit in a poem or song, and is similar to the paragraph unit in prose.

  10. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading Line and Stanza Typically, stanzas are separated by a line of space. In this poem, note how the poet uses lines and stanzas to help convey ideas. As you read, try to determine the author’s focus and thematic intent of each stanza.

  11. BEFORE YOU READ Analyzing Tone Tone refers to an author’s attitude toward his or her subject matter. A writer’s tone might project a variety of attitudes such as sympathy, objectivity, or humor. It may be conveyed through elements such as word choice, punctuation, sentence structure, and figures of speech.

  12. BEFORE YOU READ Analyzing Tone When you analyze the tone of a selection, you deepen your understanding of the author’s message. Try to determine the speaker’s tone as you read Hayden’s poem.

  13. BEFORE YOU READ Analyzing Tone Reading Tip: Asking Questions Use a chart like the one on the next slide to identify how the speaker uses description to achieve a certain tone. Fill in the circles with descriptions from the poem and note the tone conveyed.

  14. BEFORE YOU READ Analyzing Tone

  15. BEFORE YOU READ chronicadj. persistent; ongoing, especially of sickness or pain (p. 532) Chronic backaches made it difficult for my mom to garden. indifferentlyadv. not concerned about someone or something; without a preference (p. 532) When Mr. Tate spoke, his children listened indifferently, as they were not interested. Click a vocabulary term to listen to the definition.

  16. BEFORE YOU READ austereadj. stern; severe in appearance; (p. 532) Micky’s austere expression let us know that he was pretty disappointed. Click a vocabulary term to listen to the definition.

  17. READING THE SELECTION The Energy of the EverydayWhat details make the everyday actions described in the poem particularly vivid? Answer:You might mention imagery such as “the blueblack cold” or “cracked hands that ached” as particularly vivid.

  18. READING THE SELECTION Reading Strategy Analyzing ToneRead the text highlighted in blue on page 532.How do these five words from the speaker contribute to the tone of the poem? Answer:Some may say that this suggests a sad, regretful tone. Others may say that it shows the true nature of love: do something kind without getting anything in return.

  19. READING THE SELECTION Viewing the Art Look at the painting on page 532.How would you describe this man’s expression and mood? Compare and contrast them to the personal qualities conveyed by the speaker of the poem.

  20. READING THE SELECTION Viewing the Art Answer:Observational and stoic. It reflects the speaker’s melancholic revelation of his father’s love.

  21. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Respond • Which one line or image from “Those Winter Sundays” most resonated with you? Explain. Answer:Answers will vary.

  22. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret • (a) What did the speaker’s father do on Sunday mornings in the winter? (b) As a child, did the speaker appreciate his father’s efforts? How do you know?

  23. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret Answer: (a) He stoked the furnace to warm the room before waking his children. (b) No; he spoke indifferently to him.

  24. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret • (a) Why do you think the speaker spoke indifferently to his father? (b) In the third stanza, how has the father “driven out the cold”? Answer: (a) He took his father for granted. (b) The father provides warmth as well as love.

  25. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret • What does the speaker now understand that he did not understand before? Answer: Love is expressed in common, everyday gestures.

  26. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate • (a) How does the speaker personify the cold? (b) How does this reflect the son’s feelings? Answer:(a) By giving it shape and sound (b) Reflects the son’s indifferent, ungrateful feelings toward his father

  27. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate • (a) What do you think was Robert Hayden’s motive in writing this poem? (b) Who do you think he would most like to reach with this poem? Answer:(a) To point out the limited perspective children have of their parents (b) Children and adults who remember being children

  28. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Connect The Energy of the Everyday • In what ways does Hayden bring greater significance to the daily responsibilities a parent performs? Explain Answer:The poem asks the readers to examine the small, daily things people do for others.

  29. AFTER YOU READ Line and Stanza Examining the contribution each line and stanza makes to the overall movement and thematic development of the poem can help you better understand the poet’s purpose and intention.

  30. AFTER YOU READ Line and Stanza • What is the specific focus of each separate stanza? How might the focus of the third stanza incorporate those of the first two Answer:First: father; second: speaker; third: interaction between the two

  31. AFTER YOU READ Line and Stanza • How does each line in the poem trace the speaker’s development as a person? Answer:The second and third stanzas trace his realization of his father’s love and his regret over not appreciating it.

  32. AFTER YOU READ Writing About Literature Apply Theme In many of his poems, Hayden revisits the settings of his working-class Detroit childhood. Imagine a conversation between a child and his or her parent or guardian on such a winter morning.

  33. AFTER YOU READ Writing About Literature In your conversation, the two can either bring up or avoid issues of gratitude and fear of anger. Write down this imagined conversation, including words, phrases, or images from the poem that made an impression upon you.

  34. AFTER YOU READ Analyzing Tone Analyzing tone helps you better understand the message the poet tries to convey and the response the poet strives to elicit. Pay attention to word choice, repetition, and imagery used to convey a particular feeling. Review the descriptions in your chart to help you answer the following questions.

  35. AFTER YOU READ Analyzing Tone • How do the speaker’s descriptions of the cold house mirror his attitude toward his father? Answer:They reveal his lack of sympathy for his father.

  36. AFTER YOU READ Analyzing Tone • Examine the speaker’s word choice. What does it tell you about the speaker and his father’s love? Answer:Love isn’t always demonstrative but sometimes subtle and quietly expressed.

  37. AFTER YOU READ Practice Practice with Context CluesFor each vocabulary word, use context clues to figure out its meaning. Think about which type of context clue helped you.

  38. AFTER YOU READ Practice • Every time Jane fidgeted, Grandmother gave her an austere, disapproving look. • nervous • stern • warm

  39. AFTER YOU READ Practice • Mary suffered from chronic allergies until she finally got a prescription for a new medication. • ongoing • extreme • occasional

  40. AFTER YOU READ Practice • Shipra did not care which movie we saw, so she reacted indifferently when I picked one. • sadly • happily • without a preference

  41. SELECTION MENU Selection Menu (pages 535–539) Before You Read Reading the Selection After You Read

  42. BEFORE YOU READ Meet Billy Collins Click the picture to learn about the author.

  43. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poem The following poem talks about seeing creatures in everyday objects. Before you read the poem, think about the following questions: • What do you see when you look at clouds? • Do you expect age or experience to change what you see?

  44. BEFORE YOU READ Building Background Hamlet tells the story of the sensitive young prince of Denmark in the months after his father, the king, is murdered by his uncle Claudius. Hamlet resolves to murder Claudius as retribution. However, he spends much of the play thinking and soliloquizing rather than acting on his resolution. As a result of his reputation as a thinker, and not a doer, Hamlet has often been reimagined as the archetypal pensive, tormented male artist.

  45. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading The Energy of the Everyday As you read this poem, pay attention to how creatures are seen in everyday objects and how the speaker reacts to them.

  46. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading Enjambment Enjambment is the continuation of the sense of a sentence or phrase from one line of a poem to the next without a pause between the lines.

  47. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading Enjambment The first line below is an example of enjambment: Many times I would be daydreaming on the carpet and one would appear next to me,