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UNIT 3, Part 1 The Energy of the Everyday

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  1. UNIT 3, Part 1 The Energy of the Everyday Click the mouse button or press the space bar to continue

  2. Unit 3, Part 1 MAIN MENU The Energy of the Everyday (pages 557–582) Click a selection title to go to the corresponding selection menu.

  3. SELECTION MENU Selection Menu (pages 557–562) Before You Read Reading the Selection After You Read Grammar Workshop

  4. BEFORE YOU READ Meet Alexsandr Solzhenitsyn Click the picture to learn about the author.

  5. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poem The speaker of this poem describes his sense of awe at the power of an intense thunderstorm. Using vivid language, Solzhenitsyn shows the reader how inspiring nature can be.

  6. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poem Before you read the poem, think about the following questions: • How would you react if you had no shelter and were caught in a sudden thunderstorm? • Recall a time when you witnessed severe weather. How did it make you feel?

  7. BEFORE YOU READ Building Background The former Soviet Union, also known as the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, or U.S.S.R., was vast in size. It spanned from the Pacific Ocean to the Baltic and Black seas, over 6,800 miles from east to west. From north to south it stretched 2,800 miles. It consisted of 8,650,000 total square miles; the equivalent of over two times the area of the United States.

  8. BEFORE YOU READ Building Background The climate of the Soviet Union varied greatly. Its northern latitude and the southern mountain barriers ensured that the majority of the region had a cold climate. Extreme weather was common; only winter and summer existed as distinct seasons. The milder temperatures of spring and fall were typically short-lived points during periods of rapid weather change.

  9. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading The Energy of the Everyday As you read, note the descriptive language Solzhenitsyn uses to describe an event as common as a storm.

  10. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading Prose Poetry An alternative to verse form, prose poetry avoids line breaks and uses sentence and paragraph form instead. As you read, notice how prose poetry relies largely on imagery to convey ideas and emotions.

  11. BEFORE YOU READ Visualizing Visualizing is using words to create a mental picture. Authors often use imagery to help readers put themselves into the environment or mood of a poem or story. Visualizing is not limited to visual images; it encompasses perceptions from all five senses. While reading this poem, create a mental representation of the sensations described.

  12. BEFORE YOU READ Visualizing Reading Tip: Creating a List Use a chart like the one below to list examples of words or phrases from the poem that appeal to your senses.

  13. BEFORE YOU READ searingadj. extremely hot or bright (p. 560) The searing sunlight woke me up before my alarm clock went off. chaosn. a state of disorder and confusion (p. 560) After the tornado hit, the town was filled with chaos. Click a vocabulary term to listen to the definition.

  14. BEFORE YOU READ gorgen. the passageway between two higher land areas, such as a narrow valley (p. 560) The grand Canyon is one of the United States’ most famous gorges. serpentineadj. snake-like, twisting, winding (p. 560) He had to pay attention as he drove on the serpentine mountain road. Click a vocabulary term to listen to the definition.

  15. BEFORE YOU READ primaladj. a basic, original state of being; (p. 560) One primal instinct is survival. Click a vocabulary term to listen to the definition.

  16. READING THE SELECTION The Energy of the Everyday Keep the following questions in mind as you read the poem on page 560 of your textbook. How do the author’s words help you to visualize the energy of the storm in the mountains? How do you think the author feels about the storm he describes?

  17. READING THE SELECTION Answer:You might identify words liked “plunged” and “bursting” as conveying energy. Words like “awe” and “hugeness” show how the author feels about the magnitude of the storm.

  18. READING THE SELECTION Reading Strategy VisualizationRead the text highlighted in blue on page 560.How does Solzhenitsyn’s imagery help you imagine the setting of the poem?

  19. READING THE SELECTION Reading Strategy Answer: You may say that the description of the landscape springing back helps you picture the surroundings as they are brightened suddenly from the lightning and then go back to darkness.

  20. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Respond • What example of imagery in the poem did you find most striking? Explain. Answer:Answers will vary.

  21. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret • (a) How does the speaker describe the lightning in the fourth paragraph? (b) What does this comparison suggest about his view of nature?

  22. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret Answer: (a) As arrow-like, then compared to a serpent; and finally it is said to be “like a living thing.” (b) Nature may not be separate from humans, but instead something of which we are a part.

  23. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret • (a) What does the speaker compare himself and his group to at the end of the poem? (b) What does the speaker’s changing feelings about the storm indicate about people’s place in nature?

  24. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret Answer: (a) Droplets of water in an ocean (b) Humans may fear and feel removed from nature, but we are still small elements of a much larger world.

  25. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate • Why, in your opinion, does the speaker think he can report on others’ feelings and thoughts? Answer:You may say that the speaker expresses this as a universal experience.

  26. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate • How can the storm make the speaker feel that one moment he is firmly on the ground, yet the very next he is plunged into chaos? Explain. Answer:The abrupt switches between light and dark make things seem unstable.

  27. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate • Why do the speaker and his companions forget to be afraid of the powerful storm? Answer:The storm was so beautiful and amazing that the observers forgot that it might be a threat to them.

  28. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Connect The Energy of Everyday • How would you explain the author’s view of the relationship between people and nature? Answer:You might say that human beings and nature are not unrelated but exist parallel to each other

  29. AFTER YOU READ Prose Poetry Unlike poems that use verses and stanzas, prose poetry follows the narrative style with sentences and paragraphs but also maintains rhythm.

  30. AFTER YOU READ Prose Poetry • Read aloud the following phrase, “Everything was black—no peaks, no valleys, no horizon to be seen. . . .” Explain how this line blends poetic elements with prose format.

  31. AFTER YOU READ Prose Poetry Answer:The sentence form shows prose format, but the rhythmic pattern makes it poetic.

  32. AFTER YOU READ Prose Poetry • Read aloud the following phrase, “. . . then split up into serpentine streams as though bursting into spray against the rock face, or striking and then shattering. . . .” What about this phrase makes it poetic?

  33. AFTER YOU READ Prose Poetry Answer:This phrase uses the poetic device of alliteration, giving the line musical and onomatopoetic effects.

  34. AFTER YOU READ Interdisciplinary Activity: Music The rhythm and flow of the words in a poem can be very similar to the lyrics in a song or the steady rhythm and tone of a piece of music. Music or song can also convey many of the same emotions and thoughts as a poem.

  35. AFTER YOU READ Interdisciplinary Activity: Music Think of what kind of song and style of music would best depict the action and feeling of “A Storm in the Mountains.” Write song lyrics using your own words to express what the poem says. Then describe what type of music would best suit your song.

  36. AFTER YOU READ Visualizing Using visualizing allows the reader to connect to the poem and understand its tone and meaning.

  37. AFTER YOU READ Visualizing • Which sensory details particularly helped you understand or connect to the poem? Explain. Answer:You might cite specific passages and identify which details they visualized.

  38. AFTER YOU READ Visualizing • Which sensory details do you think best communicated the tone and meaning of the poem? Answer:You might cite the phrases “shattering like a living thing” or “the hugeness filling us with awe.”

  39. AFTER YOU READ Practice Practice with AnalogiesComplete the following analogies. Use a dictionary if you need help.

  40. AFTER YOU READ Practice • searing : hot :: freezing : • cold • temperature

  41. AFTER YOU READ Practice • chaos : disorder :: boisterous : • male • noise

  42. AFTER YOU READ Practice • gorge : land :: channel : • television • sea

  43. AFTER YOU READ Practice • serpentine : twisting :: circuitous : • circus-like • circular

  44. AFTER YOU READ Practice • primal : civilized :: puerile : • infant • adult

  45. SELECTION MENU Selection Menu (pages 563–568) Before You Read Reading the Selection After You Read

  46. BEFORE YOU READ Meet N. Scott Momaday Click the picture to learn about the author.

  47. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poems The following two poems express a deep appreciation for animals, including animals that most people would be afraid of. Looking at creatures with an unconventional or different perspective can change the way in which you relate to nature.