Collaborators: May Al Dabbagh, Linda Babcock, Julia Bear, Lei Lai, Kathleen McGinn, Bobbi Thomason - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  1. Gender in job negotiationsThree Things to rememberHannah Riley BowlesInternational Women’s day 2012The heller School, Brandeis university Collaborators: May Al Dabbagh, Linda Babcock, Julia Bear, Lei Lai, Kathleen McGinn, Bobbi Thomason

  2. International Women’s Day “It is an occasion for looking back on past struggles and accomplishments, and more importantly, for looking ahead to the untapped potential and opportunities that await future generations of women.” United Nations Womenwatch

  3. International Women’s Day “It is an occasion for looking back on past struggles and accomplishments, and more importantly, for looking ahead to the untapped potential and opportunities that await future generations of women.” United Nations Womenwatch

  4. Why Negotiation? • Negotiating the Path to Leadership • Negotiation is an essential process for gaining resources and opportunities for the attainment of leadership positions. • Potential leaders negotiate to… • Seize opportunities to expand their authority • Gain recognition and rewards • Overcome barriers or challenges

  5. Why Negotiation? • Negotiating the Path to Leadership • Negotiation is an essential process for gaining resources and opportunities for the attainment of leadership positions. • Potential leaders negotiate to… • Seize opportunities to expand their authority • Gain recognition and rewards • Overcome barriers or challenges

  6. Why Negotiation? • Negotiating the Path to Leadership • Negotiation is an essential process for gaining resources and opportunities for the attainment of leadership positions. • Potential leaders negotiate to… • Seize opportunities to expand their authority • Gain recognition and rewards • Overcome barriers or challenges

  7. Why Negotiation? • Negotiating the Path to Leadership • Negotiation is an essential process for gaining resources and opportunities for the attainment of leadership positions. • Potential leaders negotiate to… • Seize opportunities to expand their authority • Gain recognition and rewards • Overcome barriers or challenges

  8. Why Negotiation? • Negotiating the Path to Leadership • Negotiation is an essential process for gaining resources and opportunities for the attainment of leadership positions. • Potential leaders negotiate to… • Seize opportunities to expand their authority • Gain recognition and rewards • Overcome barriers or challenges

  9. Why Negotiation? • Negotiating the Path to Leadership • Negotiation is an essential process for gaining resources and opportunities for the attainment of leadership positions. • Potential leaders negotiate to… • Seize opportunities to expand their authority • Gain recognition and rewards • Overcome barriers or challenges

  10. 3 Ideas on Gender & Negotiation #1 Women have less opportunity than men #2 Ambiguity heightens potential for gender effects #3 Gender in negotiation is a two-level game

  11. 3 Ideas on Gender & Negotiation #1 Women have less opportunity than men #2 Ambiguity heightens potential for gender effects #3 Gender in negotiation is a two-level game

  12. 3 Ideas on Gender & Negotiation #1 Women have less opportunity than men #2 Ambiguity heightens potential for gender effects #3 Gender in negotiation is a two-level game

  13. 3 Ideas on Gender & Negotiation #1 Women have less opportunity than men #2 Ambiguity heightens potential for gender effects #3 Gender in negotiation is a two-level game

  14. 3 Ideas on Gender & Negotiation #1 Women have less opportunity than men #2 Ambiguity heightens potential for gender effects #3 Gender in negotiation is a two-level game

  15. Idea #1 • Women have less opportunity than men to negotiate for career advancement • Social Networks • Influence access to information and career support • Gender Stereotypes • Inhibit women more than men from self-advocating in negotiations

  16. Idea #1 • Women have less opportunity than men to negotiate for career advancement • Social Networks • Influence access to information and career support • Gender Stereotypes • Inhibit women more than men from self-advocating in negotiations

  17. Idea #1 • Women have less opportunity than men to negotiate for career advancement • Social Networks • Influence access to information and career support • Gender Stereotypes • Inhibit women more than men from self-advocating in negotiations

  18. Idea #1 • Women have less opportunity than men to negotiate for career advancement • Social Networks • Influence access to information and career support • Gender Stereotypes • Inhibit women more than men from self-advocating in negotiations

  19. Idea #1 Unequal Opportunity Negotiating Pay *** * F(1, 111) = 4.80, p = .03 Bowles, Babcock & Lei (2007, Study 1)

  20. Idea #1 Unequal Opportunity Negotiating Pay *** * F(1, 111) = 4.80, p = .03 Bowles, Babcock & Lei (2007, Study 1)

  21. Idea #1 Unequal Opportunity Negotiating Pay *** * Social Cost for Men F(1, 111) = 4.80, p = .03 Bowles, Babcock & Lei (2007, Study 1)

  22. Idea #1 Unequal Opportunity Negotiating Pay *** * Social Cost for Men Social Cost for Women F(1, 111) = 4.80, p = .03 Bowles, Babcock & Lei (2007, Study 1)

  23. Global vs. Local Studies conducted in Arab Gulf—Saudi Arabia (KSA) and United Arab Emirates (UAE) • Rapidly globalizing region • Foreign workers >80% private-sector jobs (Arab Labor Organization, 2010) • Private-sector Lingua Franca is English • Mission of “reform universities” is to prepare local graduates for the global workplace (selected in KSA; nationwide in UAE)

  24. Global vs. Local Studies conducted in Arab Gulf—Saudi Arabia (KSA) and United Arab Emirates (UAE) • Rapidly globalizing region • Foreign workers >80% private-sector jobs (Arab Labor Organization, 2010) • Private-sector Lingua Franca is English • Mission of “reform universities” is to prepare local graduates for the global workplace (selected in KSA; nationwide in UAE)

  25. Global vs. Local Studies conducted in Arab Gulf—Saudi Arabia (KSA) and United Arab Emirates (UAE) • Rapidly globalizing region • Foreign workers >80% private-sector jobs (Arab Labor Organization, 2010) • Private-sector Lingua Franca is English • Mission of “reform universities” is to prepare local graduates for the global workplace (selected in KSA; nationwide in UAE)

  26. Global vs. Local Studies conducted in Arab Gulf—Saudi Arabia (KSA) and United Arab Emirates (UAE) • Rapidly globalizing region • Foreign workers >80% private-sector jobs (Arab Labor Organization, 2010) • Private-sector Lingua Franca is English • Mission of “reform universities” is to prepare local graduates for the global workplace (selected in KSA; nationwide in UAE)

  27. Global vs. Local Studies conducted in Arab Gulf—Saudi Arabia (KSA) and United Arab Emirates (UAE) • Rapidly globalizing region • Foreign workers >80% private-sector jobs (Arab Labor Organization, 2010) • Private-sector Lingua Franca is English • Mission of “reform universities” is to prepare local graduates for the global workplace (selected in KSA; nationwide in UAE)

  28. Global/Local Work Cultures

  29. Idea #1 Unequal Opportunity Negotiating Pay *** * Social Cost for Men F(1, 111) = 4.80, p = .03 Bowles, Babcock & Lei (2007, Study 1)

  30. Idea #1 Unequal Opportunity Negotiating Pay *** * Social Cost for Men Social Cost for Women F(1, 111) = 4.80, p = .03 Bowles, Babcock & Lei (2007, Study 1)

  31. Global/Local Work Cultures Social Cost for Men

  32. Global/Local Work Cultures Social Cost for Women Social Cost for Men

  33. Global/Local Work Cultures Social Cost for Women Social Cost for Men

  34. Global/Local Work Cultures Social Cost for Women Social Cost for Men

  35. Global/Local Work Cultures Social Cost for Women Social Cost for Men

  36. Global/Local Work Cultures Social Cost for Women Social Cost for Men

  37. Global/Local Work Cultures Social Cost for Women Social Cost for Men

  38. #1: Practical Implications • Individuals: Use your knowledge about gender stereotypes • “Relational Accounts” • Employ legitimate explanations that • Demonstrateconcern for organizational relationships • Organizations: Do men and women feel equally comfortable negotiating? Bowles & Babcock (2011)

  39. #1: Practical Implications • Individuals: How can you use your knowledge about stereotypes? • “Relational Accounts” • Employ legitimate explanations that • Demonstrateconcern for organizational relationships • Organizations: Do men and women feel equally comfortable negotiating? Bowles & Babcock (2011)

  40. #1: Practical Implications • Individuals: How can you use your knowledge about stereotypes? • “Relational Accounts” • Employ legitimate explanations that • Demonstrateconcern for organizational relationships • Organizations: Do men and women feel equally comfortable negotiating? Bowles & Babcock (2011)

  41. #1: Practical Implications • Individuals: How can you use your knowledge about stereotypes? • “Relational Accounts” • Employ legitimate explanations that also • Demonstrateconcern for organizational relationships • Organizations: Do men and women feel equally comfortable negotiating? Bowles & Babcock (2011)

  42. #1: Practical Implications • Individuals: How can you use your knowledge about stereotypes? • “Relational Accounts” • Employ legitimate explanations that also • Demonstrateconcern for organizational relationships • Organizations: Do men and women feel equally comfortable negotiating? Bowles & Babcock (2011)

  43. Relational Accounts Research Examples • Supervisor Excuse Account • “My team leader during the training program told me that I should talk with you about my compensation. It wasn’t clear to us whether this salary offer represents the top of the pay range. My team leader told me there’s a range in term of how much managers are paid in their first placement. He thought I should ask to be paid at the top of that range and to explain that I would also like to be eligible for an end of year bonus.”

  44. Relational Accounts Research Examples • Supervisor Excuse Account • “My team leader during the training program told me that I should talk with you about my compensation. It wasn’t clear to us whether this salary offer represents the top of the pay range. My team leader told me there’s a range in term of how much managers are paid in their first placement. He thought I should ask to be paid at the top of that range and to explain that I would also like to be eligible for an end of year bonus.”

  45. Relational Accounts Research Examples • Skill Contribution Account • [Negotiation Request] “I don’t know how typical it is for people at my level to negotiate, but I’m hopeful you’ll see my skill at negotiating as something important that I bring to the job.”

  46. Relational Accounts Executive Examples: • Sheryl Sandberg strategy: • “This is the last time you and I are going to be negotiating across the table from one another, and you want a head of sales who negotiates…” Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg

  47. Relational Accounts Executive Examples • Senior executive finds for second time that a male subordinate is paid more than she is. • “I am confident this is just a mistake. The company does not want subordinates paid higher than their managers.” • Woman is asked to lead a diversity initiative • “How will be measure this initiative’s contribution to the bottom line?” • “If you want this position to have the authority you describe, then I think the compensation should be set at [X] level.”

  48. Relational Accounts Executive Examples • Senior executive finds for second time that a male subordinate is paid more than she is • “I am confident this is just a mistake. The company does not want subordinates paid higher than their managers.” • Woman is asked to lead a diversity initiative • “How will be measure this initiative’s contribution to the bottom line?” • “If you want this position to have the authority you describe, then I think the compensation should be set at [X] level.”

  49. Relational Accounts Executive Examples • Senior executive finds for second time that a male subordinate is paid more than she is • “I am confident this is just a mistake. The company does not want subordinates paid higher than their managers.” • Woman is asked to lead a diversity initiative • “How will be measure this initiative’s contribution to the bottom line?” • “If you want this position to have the authority you describe, then I think the compensation should be set at [X] level.”

  50. Relational Accounts Executive Examples • Senior executive finds for second time that a male subordinate is paid more than she is • “I am confident this is just a mistake. The company does not want subordinates paid higher than their managers.” • Senior woman is asked to lead a diversity initiative • “How will be measure this initiative’s contribution to the bottom line?” • “If you want this position to have the authority you describe, then I think the compensation should be set at [X] level.”