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Teacher Effectiveness Performance Evaluation System. Student Growth Objectives 102. POP QUIZ! How much do you know about your trainer?. What is your trainer’s name? Kate Wolfe Leonard Nimoy Daffy Duck None of the above. POP QUIZ! How much do you know about your trainer?.

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Teacher Effectiveness Performance Evaluation System


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    pop quiz how much do you know about your trainer
    POP QUIZ! How much do you know about your trainer?

    What is your trainer’s name?

    • Kate Wolfe
    • Leonard Nimoy
    • Daffy Duck
    • None of the above
    pop quiz how much do you know about your trainer1
    POP QUIZ! How much do you know about your trainer?

    In her previous job as a teacher, what grade levels did your trainer teach?

    • Kindergarten
    • 8th grade
    • 3rd and 4th grade
    • Social Studies and English
    pop quiz how much do you know about your trainer2
    POP QUIZ! How much do you know about your trainer?

    Before becoming a consultant, what were your trainer’s previous educational occupations?

    • Teacher, technology coach, employee development supervisor
    • Reading specialist, assistant principal, principal
    • School counselor, Director of Counseling, Special Services Coordinator
    • All of the above
    correct answers
    Correct Answers
    • A
    • C
    • A

    How did you do?

    four organizing questions
    Four Organizing Questions
    • Why do we assess?
    • What do we assess?
    • How do we assess?
    • When and how do we implement assessments?
    question 1
    Question 1

    WHY do we assess?

    human graph
    Human Graph

    “Far more testing goes into our students’ hair gel and acne cream than into most of the curriculums or instructional methods teachers use.”

    (Robert E. Slavin, Educational Leadership, Feb 2003)

    Disagree

    Agree

    activity round and round
    Activity: Round and Round
    • Divide into groups of 3-4.
    • One blank sheet of chart paper per group.
    • Designate who starts. That person writes ONE reason that we assess students on the sheet of paper.
    • When the trainer calls “time” (after about 15 seconds) you pass it to the next person, who adds something.
    • You can “pass” if you can’t think of something within the 15 seconds.
    the many purposes of assessments
    The Many Purposes of Assessments
    • Find out what students already know and can do.
    • Help students improve their learning.
    • Let students, and their families, know how much they have learned within a prescribed period of time.

    Cooper, 2007

    why assessment and instruction are inseparable
    Why Assessment and Instruction are Inseparable

    Instruction

    Assessment

    Curriculum

    vocabulary time
    Vocabulary Time!

    Diagnostic Assessment

    Formative Assessment

    Summative Assessment

    formative assessment assessment for learning
    Formative Assessment:Assessment FOR Learning

    “Assessment for learning encompasses both diagnostic (initial) and formative assessment; it is assessment that occurs during the instructional process and is primarily intended to help students improve their learning.”

    Cooper, 2007

    for mative assessment
    Formative Assessment

    Any activity you do that helps you assess where your students currently are with their learning and understanding is “for” learning.

    for mative assessment examples
    Formative Assessment Examples
    • Human Graph
    • Round and Round
    • Question and Answer
    summative assessment assessment of learning
    Summative Assessment:Assessment OF Learning

    Any activity you do that provides feedback on what the students have learned in a chapter, unit, quarter, and/or semester is “of” learning.

    assessment of l earning examples
    Assessment OF Learning Examples
    • Quizzes
    • Tests
    • Performance Tasks
    • Projects
    • Etc.
    student growth objective process
    Student Growth Objective Process

    Diagnostic Formative Assessment

    Summative

    Assessment

    Step 2:

    Create specific SGOs using pre-assessment

    Step 4:

    Monitor progress through ongoing formative assessment

    Step 1:

    Determine needs

    Step 5:

    Determine whether students achieved the SGO

    Step 3:

    Create and implement teaching and learning strategies

    Ongoing Formative Assessment

    question 2
    Question 2

    WHAT do we assess?

    conducting a curriculum review
    Conducting a Curriculum Review
    • How many standards do we currently have?
    • How long do we have in the SGO period?
    vocabulary time1
    Vocabulary Time!

    Validity

    Reliability

    valid
    Valid
    • Is it measuring what we want it to measure?
    • Is it “on target?”
    valid reliable
    Valid & Reliable

    Is it consistently measuring what we want it to measure?

    vocabulary time three types of validity
    Vocabulary Time:Three Types of Validity

    Construct validity

    Content validity

    Criterion validity

    construct validity
    Construct Validity

    How accurately an assessment aligns with the theoretical framework of the intended learning outcomes, standards, or objectives of the instructional course

    Ask yourself: Can we infer a student’s knowledge and/or skills in this subject area from the assessment?

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    content validity
    Content Validity

    How adequately an assessment samples the intended learning outcomes, standards, and objectives of an instructional unit

    Ask yourself: Does the assessment adequately sample the intended learning outcomes? Are there items on the assessment with no corresponding intended learning outcomes?

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    criterion validity
    Criterion Validity

    How accurately an assessment equates with another assessment that is intended to measure the same learning outcomes, standards, or measures

    Ask yourself: Does the assessment measure intended outcomes of learning that are also measured on some other assessment?

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    unpacking a standard
    Unpacking a Standard
    • Determine the content.
    • Determine the cognitive level. (Bloom’s Taxonomy, Revised)
    bloom s taxonomy revised
    Bloom’s Taxonomy (Revised)

    Remember

    Recalling previously learned information

    Understand

    Demonstrate and understanding of the facts; explaining ideas or concepts

    Apply

    Using information in another familiar situation

    Analyze

    Breaking information into parts to explore understandings and relationships

    Evaluate

    Justifying a decision or course of action

    Create

    Generating new ideas, products, or ways of viewing things

    bloom s taxonomy revised1
    Bloom’s Taxonomy (Revised)

    Remember

    arrange, define, describe, duplicate, identify, label, list, match, memorize, name, order, recall, relate, recognize, repeat, select, state

    Understand

    classify, convert, defend, describe, discuss, distinguish, estimate, explain, give examples, identify, locate, paraphrase, predict, summarize

    Apply

    change, choose, compute, demonstrate, employ, illustrate, interpret, manipulate, modify, practice, prepare, show, sketch, solve, use

    Analyze

    appraise, breakdown, calculate, categorize, compare, contrast, diagram, differentiate, distinguish, examine, infer, model, question, test

    Evaluate

    appraise, argue, assess, attach, choose, conclude, defend, discriminate, estimate, judge, justify, interpret, rate, support, value

    Create

    assemble, combine, compose, construct, design, develop, devise, formulate, generate, plan, set up, synthesize, tell, write

    example unpacking a standard
    Example: Unpacking a Standard

    For each learning objective, underline the content, circle the word(s) that provide(s) information regarding cognitive level, and finally, classify the word(s) into one of Bloom’s six cognitive levels.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.1.2 Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

    example unpacking a standard1
    Example: Unpacking a Standard

    For each learning objective, underline the content, circle the word(s) that provide information regarding cognitive level, and finally, classify the word into one of Bloom’s six cognitive levels.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.1.2 Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

    Understand

    example unpacking a standard2
    Example: Unpacking a Standard

    For each learning objective, underline the content, circle the word(s) that provide(s) information regarding cognitive level, and finally, classify the word into one of Bloom’s six cognitive levels.

    US History 6.1.8.D.1.a: Compare and contrast gender roles, religion, values, cultural practices, and political systems of Native American groups.

    example unpacking a standard3
    Example: Unpacking a Standard

    For each learning objective, underline the content, circle the word(s) that provide(s) information regarding cognitive level, and finally, classify the word into one of Bloom’s six cognitive levels.

    US History 6.1.8.D.1.a: Compare and contrast gender roles, religion, values, cultural practices, and political systems of Native American groups.

    Analyze

    why is cognitive level so important
    Why is cognitive level so important?

    Teacher A needs to assess the standard from the previous slide. During class, she has students copy a chart and fill in the gender roles, religion, values, cultural practices, and political systems of the appropriate Native American groups while they read the accompanying chapter in their textbook. On the unit test, she randomly chooses two Native American groups and they must fill out the same chart with the information.

    What’s wrong with the instructional and the assessment activity?

    activity unpack your standards
    Activity: Unpack Your Standards
    • Use an example from your own curriculum.
    • Choose 3-5 standards and unpack them. What levels do you find?
    • What conclusions can you draw about the instruction and assessments that will be needed?
    how much will you assess
    How much will you assess?
    • Remember that you cannot assess everything in any curriculum.
    • Either choose a variety of content (for instance, a few strands from each standard), course-long skills, or some of each.
    questions to ask to narrow down the standards
    Questions to Ask to Narrow Down the Standards:
    • What content/skills must the student master to be successful in either real-life or future levels in this subject?
    • How much is developmentally appropriate for the age/grade level?
    • How much time do I have to assess?
    activity create a table of specifications
    Activity: Create a Table of Specifications
    • Review your curriculum.
    • Determine which content and/or skills should/will be assessed.
    • Create a Table of Specifications either using paper/pencil or the electronic version provided.
    question 3
    Question 3

    HOW do we assess?

    activity abc summative assessment
    Activity: ABC Summative Assessment
    • Sort into groups of 3-4.
    • Use your ABC chart.
    • How many different types of assessments can you name in 2 minutes? Example: T is for True/False; P is for Performance Assessment.
    • You do NOT have to go in ABC order.
    main types of assessment select response
    Main Types of Assessment: Select Response
    • Objective—right or wrong answers
    • Usually “paper and pencil”
    • Examples
      • Multiple choice
      • True/false
      • Matching
    main types of assessment supply response
    Main Types of Assessment: Supply Response
    • Written or oral
    • React to and use information
    • Generally graded with a rubric
    • Examples
      • Fill-in-the-Blank
      • Short Answer
      • Essay
    main types of assessment performance task
    Main Types of Assessment: Performance Task
    • Apply knowledge
    • Usually “real life” situations
    • Generally graded with a rubric
    • Examples:
      • Role-play (debates, skits)
      • Model/Simulation
      • Performance/Product
    vocabulary time types of error that interfere with reliability
    Vocabulary Time!Types of Error That Interfere with Reliability

    Random Error

    Systematic Error

    random error
    Random Error
    • Error that influences assessment results but is NOT controllable
      • Illness
      • Carelessness
      • Luck
      • Unhappiness
      • Momentary distractedness
      • Fire alarm
      • Wobbly desk
      • Etc.

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    systematic error
    Systematic Error
    • Unintentionally built into an assessment but CAN be controlled
      • Culturally biased language and expressions
      • Developmentally inappropriate reading level
      • Mechanical or grammatical mistakes in assessment items
      • Insufficient or unclear directions
      • Poor layout, causing uncertainty or mistakes in reading the assessment
      • Insufficient number of assessment items
      • Subjective scoring
      • Cheating

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    decreasing systematic error rules for overall test construction
    Decreasing Systematic Error: Rules for Overall Test Construction
    • Make sure one item does not give away the answer to another item (cluing).
    • Provide clear directions to each portion of the test.
    • Place individual test items on one full page.
    • Make sure the test is neat and error-free.
    • Provide clear and adequate response spaces.
    • Provide point values for older students.
    • Organize the test by item type format.

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    select response true false
    Select Response: True/False
    • Amount of Time Each Items Takes to Answer: 15 seconds
    • Cognitive level it best evaluates: Remembering, Understanding
    select response rules true false
    Select Response Rules: True/False
    • Place only one idea in the true/false statement.
    • Make sure the statement is absolutely true or absolutely false.
    • Avoid qualifiers such as “always” and “never.”
    • Avoid opinion statements.
    • Avoid using negatives in the statement.

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    evaluate this item
    Evaluate this Item

    TRUE/FALSE:

    The Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Continental Congress in 1776, and it proclaimed to the King of France that the American colonies considered themselves free.

    better item
    Better Item

    TRUE/FALSE:

    1. The Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Continental Congress in 1776.

    2. The Declaration of Independence proclaimed to the King of France that the American colonies considered themselves free.

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    select response matching
    Select Response: Matching
    • Amount of Time Each Items Takes to Answer: 60-90 seconds (depending on number of matching items)
    • Cognitive level it best evaluates: Remembering, Understanding

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    select response rules matching
    Select Response Rules: Matching
    • Use homogenous content in a matching set.
    • Place items to be matched on the right with the longer responses on the left.
    • Keep the matching set short.
    • Use an uneven number of items to match or allow responses to be used more than once.
    • Order items in a logical manner (ABC, chronological, etc.).

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    evaluate this item matching
    Evaluate this Item: Matching
    • George Washington
    • Bald eagle
    • Independence Day
    • Rosa Parks

    ___ First President of the United States

    ___ Refused to give up her seat on a bus

    ___ The day Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence

    ___ A symbol of our country

    better item1
    Better Item
    • George Washington
    • Thomas Jefferson
    • Patrick Henry
    • Paul Revere

    ___ First President of the United States

    ___ Wrote the Declaration of Independence

    ___ Said, “Give me liberty of give me death.”

    ___ Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army

    ___ Alerted Colonial militia of coming British forces

    select response multiple choice
    Select Response: Multiple Choice
    • Amount of Time Each Items Takes to Answer: 30-60seconds (depending on level of cognitive demand)
    • Cognitive level it best evaluates: Remembering, Understanding, Applying, Analyzing

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    select response rules multiple choice
    Select Response Rules: Multiple Choice

    Item Stem

    Lee surrendered to Grant at the—

    • Appomattox Court House
    • Yorktown Victory Center
    • Fredericksburg Pike
    • Cumberland Gap

    Correct Answer

    Answer choices

    Distractors

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    select response rules multiple choice stem
    Select Response Rules:Multiple Choice Stem
    • Make the problem clear the student in the item stem.
    • State the item in the positive whenever possible.
    • Make sure the item stem does not give away the correct answer.
    • Emphasize qualifiers such as most likely and best in the item stem.
    • Make sure the answer choices are plausible.
    • Develop answer choices that are parallel in grammar and length.

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    select response rules multiple choice answers
    Select Response Rules:Multiple Choice Answers
    • Avoid using “All of the above” and “None of the above.”
    • Place the answer choices in a logical order (ABC, numeric)
    • Avoid clues in the answer choices that give away the correct response.
    • Make sure that the correct response is the ONLY correct response.

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    evaluate this item1
    Evaluate this Item

    An object that does not conduct electricity well is called an—

    A insulator

    B circuit

    C magnet

    D none of the above

    better item2
    Better Item

    An object that does not conduct electricity well is called—

    A an insulator

    B a circuit

    C a magnet

    D an electromagnet

    evaluate this item2
    Evaluate this Item

    Which of these is the best way to ensure that chicken is safe to eat?

    A Wash it before cooking

    B Cook to a temperature of 165 degrees as measured by a meat thermometer

    C Look at the color

    D Serve it cold

    better item3
    Better Item

    Which of these is the best way to ensure that chicken is safe to eat?

    A Wash it before cooking

    B Cook to 165 degrees

    C Look at the color

    D Serve it cold

    evaluate this item3
    Evaluate this Item

    Good citizens—

    A kick their friends

    B cheat on tests

    C help clean the classroom

    D make fun of others

    better item4
    Better Item

    Which of the following is something that good citizens do?

    AKick their friends

    BCheat on tests

    CHelp clean the classroom

    DMake fun of others

    supply response fill in the blank
    Supply Response: Fill-in-the-Blank
    • Amount of Time Each Items Takes to Answer: 30 seconds
    • Cognitive level it best evaluates: Remember, Understand, Apply, Analyze

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    supply response rules fill in the blank
    Supply Response Rules: Fill-in-the-Blank
    • Position the blank at the end of the statement.
    • Limit the number of blanks in a statement.
    • Keep blanks the same length.

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    evaluate this item4
    Evaluate this Item

    __________________ allow plants to satisfy _____ needs and __________ to the _________________.

    better item5
    Better Item

    Qualities that allow plants to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment are called ___________________.

    supply response short answer
    Supply Response: Short Answer
    • Amount of Time Each Items Takes to Answer: 30-45 seconds
    • Cognitive level it best evaluates: Remembering, Understanding, Applying, Analyzing, Evaluating, Creating

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    supply response rules short answer
    Supply Response Rules: Short Answer
    • Make the question and the nature of the response clear to the student.
    • Develop a scoring rubric to accompany each item.
    • Provide adequate space for a response.

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    evaluate this item5
    Evaluate this Item
    • Discuss plant cells and animal cells.
    better item6
    Better Item

    Explain one way that plant and animal cells are the same and one way they are different.

    better item7
    Better Item

    EVEN BETTER:

    Explain one way that plant and animal cells are the same.

    Explain one way that plant and animal cells are different.

    supply response essay
    Supply Response: Essay
    • Amount of Time Each Items Takes to Answer: At least 60 seconds for each individual point; significant additional time may be needed
    • Cognitive level it best evaluates: Remembering, Understanding, Applying, Analyzing, Evaluating, Creating

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    supply response rules essay
    Supply Response Rules: Essay
    • Make the question and nature of the response clear to the student.
    • Avoid options within the question.
    • Develop a scoring rubric to accompany each essay item.

    Gareis & Grant (2008)

    evaluate this item essay
    Evaluate this Item: Essay

    Compare and contrast Queen Elizabeth I and Queen Mary I.

    better item8
    Better Item

    In a five paragraph essay, compare and contrast the reigns of Queen Elizabeth I and Queen Mary I in terms of: religious tolerance, public popularity, and foreign relations policy. Include specific historical events in your response to support your ideas.

    activity evaluating our assessment
    Activity: Evaluating Our Assessment
    • Use an assessment that you already have (either for an entire course or a unit).
    • Use the assessment checklist to analyze your assessment.
    question 4
    Question 4

    When and how do we implement

    assessments?

    3 2 1 feedback form
    3-2-1 Feedback Form

    Please fill out the feedback form and leave with your trainer.