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Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons

Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons

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Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons

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  1. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons One of the most powerful ways for students to learn science is through questions grounded in their own curiosity.

  2. Ice Balloons The Cold Hard Facts: Student Questions in Inquiry

  3. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons Presenters Laurie Jenkins Supervisor, MCPS, OEEP Bill Kraegel OEEP Coordinator, MCPS

  4. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons By the end of this session, participants will: • develop techniques which encourage students to ask questions • identify questions which promote inquiry • use strategies to transform questions into testable questions

  5. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons Let’s start! • Make observations and brainstorm questions…lots! • Write one question on each card • Try to create 20 or 25 questions!

  6. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons Next step: • Select one question to investigate right here! • Do the investigation!

  7. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons Reflection Time: • Newsprint: Identify the characteristics that made this question a good one to investigate. • Reporter: Share out the groups’ question, findings and the characteristics that made this a good question.

  8. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons Now that we know what a testable question is: • Divide the question cards into ones that are testable and ones that are not. • Are there any additional characteristics that these testable questions have in common that we missed?

  9. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons Turning a question into a Testable Question! • Choose one of the non-testable questions • Convert it into a testable question

  10. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons So, how did you do it? • Newsprint: List strategies that were used to turn the non-testable question into a testable question • Share strategies

  11. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons Examples of Testable and Non-Testable Questions • What is the affect of different light intensities on the temperature of soil? • Why do leaves turn red? • Why do ducks face the same direction on ponds? • What soil types absorb water the best? • Do caterpillars prefer new or old leaves? • Why do puddles disappear? • Does moss really only grow on the North side of a tree?

  12. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons Summary Outcome 1: develop techniques which encourage students to ask questions To encourage inquiry, allow students to observe and brainstorm questions – any and all! I wonder…

  13. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons Summary Outcome 2: identify questions which promote inquiry Testable questions have one variable that can be manipulated by the scientist and another that can be measured. Resources are important!

  14. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons Summary Outcome 3: use strategies to transform questions into testable questions Non-testable questions can be converted into testable questions by scanning the question/topic for two variables: one that can be manipulated and one that can be measured. Quick starts: change the why’s into how’s, or what is the affect of ….

  15. Inquiry in OEEP • How can you use these skills with your students to encourage inquiry in outdoor environmental learning? What are the challenges? • How can you use these skills with our students to incorporate STEM subjects?

  16. Questioning in Inquiry: Ice Balloons Integration of the 5 E’s: The cycle Engage Explore Explain Elaborate Evaluate

  17. References on Inquiry • Exploratorium Institute for Inquiry http://www.exploratorium.edu/IFI/docs/Raising_Questions.pdf • Wolf, Dennis Palmer. The Art of Questioning. Academic Connections, Winter 1987 p. 1-7. • The 5 E’s – Resource:http://faculty.mwsu.edu/west/maryann.coe/coe/inquire/inquiry.htm

  18. That’s All Folks! Thank you for your participation!

  19. How can we use this skill with our students to encourage inquiry? Three kinds of inquiry: • Structured • Guided • Open