Section 16-3 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

section 16 3 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Section 16-3 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Section 16-3

play fullscreen
1 / 11
Section 16-3
165 Views
Download Presentation
remy
Download Presentation

Section 16-3

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Section 16-3 Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion

  2. Friction • Friction- force that opposes motion between two surfaces that are touching

  3. The Source of Friction • Friction occurs because the surface of any object is rough. • Friction is caused by 2 rough surfaces coming in contact with each other. • Factors that cause amounts of friction to change • Roughness of the surfaces • Force pushing the surfaces together.

  4. Rougher Surfaces Create More Friction • Rough surface- greater the friction. • Smooth surface- less the friction.

  5. Greater Force Creates More Friction • If the force is increased, the friction between the surfaces increases • Less massive objects exert less force on surfaces than more massive objects do.

  6. Sliding Friction • Sliding friction is very effective at opposing the movement of objects • You must exert a lot of force to overcome sliding friction • Examples: • pushing a dresser across the floor • sledding • applying brakes on a bicycle or car

  7. Rolling Friction • The force of rolling friction is usually less than the force of sliding friction. • Therefore, it is generally easier to move objects on wheels than it is to slide them along the floor. • Rolling friction is an important part of almost all means of transportation. • Anything with wheels uses rolling friction between the wheels and the ground to move forward.

  8. Fluid Friction • Fluid friction is less than sliding friction. • The term fluid includes liquids, such as water and milk, and gases, such as air and helium. • Fluid friction opposes the motion of objects traveling through a fluid.

  9. Static Friction • When a force is applied to an object but does not cause the object to move, static friction occurs. • When static friction balances the force applied, no movement occurs. • Static friction disappears as soon as an object starts moving, and then another type of friction immediately occurs.

  10. Some Ways to Reduce Friction • One way to reduce friction is to use lubricants. • Lubricants are substances that are applied to surfaces to reduce friction between them. • Some examples of common lubricants are motor oil, wax, and grease. • Friction can also be reduced by switching from sliding friction to rolling friction. • Ball bearings help reduce friction. • Another way to reduce friction is to make surfaces that rub against each other smoother.

  11. Some Ways to Increase Friction • One way to increase friction is to make surfaces rougher. • Examples: • sand on icy roads • baseball players wear textured batting glove • Another way to increase friction is to increase the force pushing the surfaces together. • Examples: • add weight to an object • sand wood faster by pressing harder on the sandpaper