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Assessing the Effectiveness of Restoration Technologies. Elise Striz and Joe Williams. Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division. Condition of Streams, Estuaries and Landscapes. Assessment. DESIRED ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITION. Restoration. Diagnosis. Assessment. Assessment.

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slide1

Assessing the Effectiveness of Restoration Technologies

Elise Striz and Joe Williams

Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division

slide2

Condition of Streams,

Estuaries and Landscapes

Assessment

DESIRED

ENVIRONMENTAL

CONDITION

Restoration

Diagnosis

Assessment

Assessment

Assessment

Forecasting

ORD Ecological Research Approach

Effectiveness ?

slide3

Restoration Plus

Research to translate ecosystem benefits into economic benefits

Watershed Managers and Partners

NRMRL GWERD

NRMRL STD

MAHA Region

The “Plus”

sustainable economies

flood reduction

carbon sequestration

species diversity

recreation

timber/wood production

safe water supply

liveability

tourism

Research to evaluate ecosystem benefits of restoration actions

Ecosystem Restoration Actions

slide5

How can we evaluate the effectiveness of stream restoration?

  • Metrics
        • Index of Biological Integrity (IBI)
        • Ecosystem Services (denitrification, carbon sequestration,etc.)
        • Stream Geomorphic Stability
        • Stream Flow
        • Sediment Transport
        • Water Quality
slide6

Impacts of Stream Restoration on Nitrate Processing, Hydrology, Biology and Sediment Transport at Mine Bank Run in Baltimore, MD

US EPA NRMRL GWERD

Maryland District USGS Water Resources Division

Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Baltimore County Department of Environmental Protection and Resource Management

Baltimore County Parks Department

slide8

Comparison of restoration technologies to be employed at Minebank Run

  • AFTER
  • Bank stabilization techniques
  • Energy dissipating structures
  • Stream channel relocation
  • BEFORE
  • Point Bars
  • Pools
  • Riffles
  • Relative effects on:
  • Water Quality ( nutrient processing)
  • IBI
  • Sediment Transport
slide9

Bank Stabilization: Re-shaping

Organic

Soils

Saturated

Zone

Organic

Soils?

Saturated

Zone?

Stream Corridor Restoration Handbook

slide10

Shallow/deep

monitoring wells

Shallow/deep

monitoring wells

Piezometer well

nests

Mine Bank Run Transect Design

slide11

Mine Bank Run Stream restoration plans

and selected transect locations

slide12

Hypothetical relationship between carbon and denitrification among stream features

Before

After

Wing

Vane

Riffle

Pool

Increasing Organic Matter

Point Bar

RipRap

Re-shaping Slope

Increasing Denitrification Activity

slide13

Hydrologic and Geomorphic Controls

on Riparian Ecosystems in the

Great Basin of Central Nevada

David G. Jewett, U.S. EPA, ORD, NRMRL, Ada, OK

Mark L. Lord, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC

Jerry R. Miller, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC

Jeanne C. Chambers, USDA Forest Service, Reno, NV

slide15

Riparian and wet meadow ecosystems

  • Comprise less than 2% of land area in the Great Basin
  • Contain a large percentage of the region’s biodiversity
  • Impacted by stream entrenchment and loss of valuable habitat
slide18

Factors to consider when evaluating management/restoration alternatives

Hydrogeological conditions leading to meadow formation

Sensitivity of existing vegetation to changes in water table depth

Challenge traditional restoration approaches because of unique groundwater/surface water dependency.

What techniques will work? What metrics can be applied?

slide20

How can we estimate the costs/benefits of stream restoration?

Costs :Accessible and Defined

  • Benefits: Existing Metrics-Can we value the change?
  • Index of Biological Integrity (IBI) – Benthic and Fish communities improve
  • Ecosystem Services (denitrification,etc.)-Water quality improvements, lower pollutant load downstream
  • Stream Geomorphic Stability-Protect infrastructure, land, maintain aquatic environment
  • Sediment Transport-Protect in stream and downstream habitats
slide22

Partnerships between ORD and Canaan Valley Institute

The Highlands Action Program model for implementing sustainable resource management decisions in the

MAHA.

  • Research to develop tools for cost/benefit analysis of restoration
  • Develop restoration prioritization methodologies including cost/benefit
slide23

We are here

Our Destination

Stable Channel

Good IBI

Balanced Sediment Transport

Improved Water Quality

Benefit>Cost

Unstable Channel

Poor IBI

Sediment Transport

Poor Water Quality

Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division