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Unit 6 Text Analysis Workshop

Unit 6 Text Analysis Workshop

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Unit 6 Text Analysis Workshop

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  1. Unit 6 Text Analysis Workshop • Grab CNBs!

  2. Strong arguments include a claim, support, and a counterargument… • Claim: writer’s position on issue • Support: reasons & evidence to support claim • Counterargument: acknowledges objections the “other side” might make and negates them

  3. Steps to Evaluating an Argument • 1. Identify the claim • Read through the whole article • Determine the claim, or their opinion • Claim is often stated in form of a generalization, a broad statement covering many situations • Ex of generalization: “Every eligible citizen should be required to vote”

  4. Steps to Evaluating an Argument • 2. Examine the evidence (how the author supports claim) • Logical Appeals use convincing reasons and evidence to appeal to a person’s logic • Reasons explain why the author holds the opinion, ex: “Citizens should be required to vote because only then will elected officials represent all the people.” • Evidence is specific info that is used to back up a reason. • Types of evidence: facts, statistics (number facts), examples, and quotes by experts • Watch for errors in logic such as hasty generalizations, or conclusions drawn from too little evidence • Ex: Our student body president is doing a terrible job and he is a guy. Boys should not be allowed to run for student council.

  5. Steps to Evaluating an Argument 2. Examine the evidence cont. • Emotional Appeals stir feelings, though are not necessarily fact based. Authors use emotional appeal because they know it might override reason • Loaded words-words with strong emotional connotations or associations) • Anecdotes- brief stories or personal accounts of an event.

  6. Steps to Evaluating an Argument • 3. Consider the counterargument • Has the writer dealt with objections? • Turn to pg. 633 • Complete the Close Read questions for Model 1 and Model 2 • I MIGHT collect them (Muwhahahaha)

  7. Persuasive Techniques PROPAGANDA: techniques used to influence opinions, emotions, attitudes or behavior. (Otherwise known as: PROPAGANDA)

  8. Who uses propaganda? • Military • Media • Advertisers • Politicians • You and I!!!

  9. Propaganda Techniques • Bandwagon Technique • Testimonial • Loaded Word • Misuse of statistics • Appeal to fear • Appeal to pity • Ethical appeal • Plain Folks • Snob Appeal • Transfer

  10. Bandwagon Technique • Everyone is doing it! You should too!!!

  11. Testimonial • A famous person endorses a product

  12. Loaded Word • Use “loaded” words like . . . • new • improved • best • super

  13. Misuse of Statistics When the statistics are based on a falsehood.

  14. Appeal to Fear • Motivates by fear

  15. Appeal to pity • Uses strong emotions of sympathy or pity to motivate

  16. Ethical Appeal • Taps into value’s or moral standards • “If you believe in education, vote against cutting after-school programs. With your help, we can keep these programs going strong.”

  17. Plain Folks • Makes the leaders look like • common people (mom and pop style).

  18. Transfer -Feelings (good or bad) are transferredto something else. Transfer tries to make you view something in the same way as they view something else. In the Kerry vs. Bush campaign, an internet email circulated showing similar physical characteristics between John Kerry and a Frankenstein monster. Another example: “Take pride in being an American. Vote for John Doe!”

  19. PRACTICE:What type of propaganda technique is used in the following ad? • Bandwagon • Loaded Words • Testimonial • Name-Calling • Plain Folks • Snob Appeal • Misuse of Statistics • Transfer B. Loaded words

  20. What type of propaganda technique is used in the following ad? • Bandwagon • Loaded Words • Testimonial • Name-Calling • Plain Folks • Snob Appeal • Misuse of Statistics • Transfer C. Testimonial

  21. Loaded Word

  22. What type of propaganda technique is used in the following ad? • Bandwagon • Loaded Words • Testimonial • Name-Calling • Plain Folks • Snob Appeal • Misuse of Statistics • Transfer A. Bandwagon

  23. What type of propaganda technique is used in the following ad? • Bandwagon • Loaded Words • Testimonial • Name-Calling • Plain Folks • Snob Appeal • Misuse of Statistics • Transfer C. Testimonial

  24. What type of propaganda technique is used in the following ad? • Bandwagon • Loaded Words • Testimonial • Name-Calling • Plain Folks • Snob Appeal • Misuse of Statistics • Transfer Loaded Word

  25. What type of propaganda technique is used in the following ad? • Bandwagon • Loaded Words • Testimonial • Name-Calling • Plain Folks • Snob Appeal • Misuse of Statistics • Transfer Bandwagon

  26. What type of propaganda is this? • Bandwagon • Loaded Words • Testimonial • Name-Calling • Plain Folks • Snob Appeal • Misuse of Statistics • Transfer • Misuse of Statistics 4 out of 5 vets recommend Iams to help your dog live healthier, longer.

  27. What type of propaganda is this? • Bandwagon • Loaded Words • Testimonial • Name-Calling • Plain Folks • Snob Appeal • Misuse of Statistics • Transfer Testimonial

  28. Turn to page 635 • Complete the Close Read questions for Model 1 and Model 2

  29. Rhetorical Devices • Rhetoric- powerful language • Rhetorical devices: • Repetition • Parallelism • Analogies • Rhetorical questions

  30. Repetition • Use same word or words more than once for emphasis • Ex: “Freedom leads to prosperity. Freedom replaces the ancient hatreds among the nations with comity and peace. Freedom is the victor.” ---Ronald Regan

  31. Parallelism • Uses similar grammatical constructions to express ideas that are related or equal in importance • Often creates a rhythm

  32. Analogy • Comparison between two things • The captain is to his ship as the chief is to his tribe • Pupils are more like oysters than sausages. The job of teaching is not to stuff them and then seal them up, but to help them open and reveal the riches within. There are pearls in each of us, if only we knew how to cultivate them with ardor and persistence.(Sydney J. Harris, "What True Education Should Do," 1964)

  33. Rhetorical Questions • Questions asked to make a point with no expectation of an answer • Ex: • "If your friend jumped off the bridge would you do it too?" • "You don't think I'm that stupid, do you?" • "Is the sky blue?" • "Is the Pope Catholic?"

  34. Turn to pg. 636 • Answer the 2 Close Read Questions for the sample reading