climate change extreme weather tribal energy sector vulnerabilities n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Climate Change & Extreme Weather: Tribal -Energy Sector Vulnerabilities PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Climate Change & Extreme Weather: Tribal -Energy Sector Vulnerabilities

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 8

Climate Change & Extreme Weather: Tribal -Energy Sector Vulnerabilities - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 169 Views
  • Uploaded on

Climate Change & Extreme Weather: Tribal -Energy Sector Vulnerabilities . Climate Change Task Force Webinar Series: Built Systems and Other Infrastructure April 10, 2014 Craig Zamuda, Ph.D. Senior Policy Advisor Office of Climate and Environmental Analysis

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Climate Change & Extreme Weather: Tribal -Energy Sector Vulnerabilities' - raina


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
climate change extreme weather tribal energy sector vulnerabilities
Climate Change & Extreme Weather: Tribal -Energy Sector Vulnerabilities

Climate Change Task Force Webinar Series:

Built Systems and Other Infrastructure

April 10, 2014

Craig Zamuda, Ph.D.

Senior Policy Advisor

Office of Climate and Environmental Analysis

Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis

U.S. Department of Energy

recent events illustrate u s energy sector vulnerability to climatic conditions
Recent Events Illustrate U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerability to Climatic Conditions
  • Thawing permafrost & melting sea ice: Damaged oil and gas infrastructure
  • Intense storms and sea level rise: Disrupted power generation and oil and gas operations
  • Lower water levels: Reduced hydropower
  • Cooling water intake or discharge too hot: Shutdown and reduced generation from power plants
  • Lower river levels: Restricted barge transportation of coal and petroleum products
  • Water restrictions due to drought: Limited shale gas and power production
  • Wildfires: Damaged transmission lines
  • Flooding: Impacts on inland power plants
impacts of increasing air and water temperatures
Impacts of Increasing Air and Water Temperatures
  • Climate Trends
  • Average temperatures have increased across the U.S. over the past 100 years
  • Heat waves have become more frequent and intense
  • Wildfire season and size of fires have increased
  • Sea ice cover has decreased in the Alaskan Arctic, and permafrost has thawed
  • Key Energy Sector Impacts
  • Increasing temperatures will likely increase electricity demand
  • Increasing air and water temperatures could decrease available thermoelectric generation capacity and efficiency
  • Increasing temperatures reduce transmission efficiency
  • Severe wildfires will increase the risk of physical damage
  • Thawing permafrost could damage oil and gas infrastructure and impact operations in Arctic Alaska, while decreasing sea ice could generate benefits

Rate of warming in the United States by region, 1901–2011

(EPA 2012a)

.

Changes in cooling degree days and heating degree days in the United States by 2080–2099 (USGCRP 2009)

impacts of decreasing water availability
Impacts of Decreasing Water Availability
  • Climate Trends
  • Precipitation patterns have changed, causing regional (“wet areas wetter & dry areas drier”) and seasonal changes with more frequent and severe droughts
  • Snowpack levels have decreased, resulting in lower summer streamflows
  • Ground and surface water levels have declined
  • Key Energy Sector Impacts
  • Lack of cooling water at thermoelectric facilities could reduce available generation capacity
  • Decreasing water availability could impact oil and gas and bioenergy production
  • Changes in precipitation/decreasing snowpack could decrease available hydropower generation capacity
  • Reductions in river levels could impede barge transport of crude oil, petroleum products, and coal
impacts of increasing storms flooding and sea level rise
Impacts of Increasing Storms, Flooding and Sea Level Rise
  • Climate Trends
  • Relative sea levels rose more than 8 inches in some regions over the past 50 years
  • Hurricanes and tropical storms have become more intense
    • A larger fraction of precipitation has fallen during intense precipitation events, which has increased flood magnitudes
  • Hurricane storm paths and locations of U.S. energy infrastructure 1980-2012 (NOAA 2013a,NOAA 2013d, NOAA 2013h, EIA 2013b)
  • Key Energy Sector Impacts
  • Coastal and offshore energy infrastructure at increased risk of damage or disruption
  • Increasing intensity of storm events increases risk of damage to electric transmission and distribution lines
  • Increasing intensity and frequency of flooding increases the risk to inland thermoelectric facilities, and to rail and barge transport of crude oil, petroleum products, and coal
climate preparedness and resiliency actions
Climate Preparedness and Resiliency Actions

Effective Actions are Underway

  • Development and Deployment of Climate Resilient Energy Technologies and Practices
    • Water capture/reuse, nontraditional cooling waters and dry cooling for thermoelectric power plants
    • Storm hardening for energy infrastructure
    • Backup Generation, Distributed Generation and Microgrids
  • Information and Assessment of Vulnerabilities from Global to Local
    • Improved data, tools, and models for characterizing vulnerabilities
      • Updated National Climate Assessment regional scenarios: http://scenarios.globalchange.gov/
      • Draft National Climate Assessment Report: http://ncadac.globalchange.gov/download/NCAJan11-2013-publicreviewdraft-fulldraft.pdf
      • Sea Level Planning Tool: www.climate.data.gov
      • DOE will soon issue the “Water- Energy Nexus Report: Challenges and Opportunities”
    • Federal Vulnerability Assessments including DOE’s “Vulnerability Report” and
      • Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower: Report to Congress
      • Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Strategy
      • Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages
climate preparedness and resiliency actions continued
Climate Preparedness and Resiliency Actions (Continued)
  • Assisting in developing actionable climate science, the climate data initiative and continuing to assess climate-change impacts to the energy sector
    • On March 19, the White House launched https://www.data.gov/climate
    • DOE is leading an interagency team to identify models, data and tools for assessing climate vulnerabilities and developing resilience strategies
  • Supporting the White House Council on Climate Preparedness and Resilience, including:
    • DOE Co-Chairs the Infrastructure Resilience Working Group: identify infrastructure vulnerabilities; relevant federal policies and programs affecting resilience; metric for success, and best practices and lessons learned
    • Collaborate with State, Local and Tribal Leaders Task Force (e.g. Built systems subgroup)
for additional information
For Additional Information

U.S. Department of Energy Contact:

Craig Zamuda, Ph.D., Craig.Zamuda@hq.doe.gov

Senior Policy Advisor

Office of Climate and Environmental Analysis

Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis

U.S. Department of Energy

Report available at :

http://energy.gov/downloads/us-energy-sector-vulnerabilities-climate-change-and-extreme-weather