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Launching the New Ship of State, 1789–1800

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  1. Chapter 10 (10 questions) Launching the New Ship of State, 1789–1800

  2. Question 1 The leading figure in drafting the Bill of Rights was • Thomas Jefferson. • John Adams. • James Monroe. • James Madison.

  3. Question 2 Hamilton’s Plan of Funding at Par meant • the federal government paying off all federal debts. • the federal government paying off all state debts. • balancing the federal budget by cancelling federal debt. • balancing the federal budget by cancelling state debt.

  4. Question 3 Hamilton’s Assumption Plan meant • the federal government paying off all federal debts. • the federal government paying off all state debts. • balancing the federal budget by cancelling federal debt. • balancing the federal budget by cancelling state debt.

  5. Question 4 All of the following were true of the Bank of the United States EXCEPT • Hamilton took as his model the Bank of England. • the government would be the major stockholder and the federal Treasury would deposit its surplus monies. • the bank would print urgently needed paper money and thus provide a sound and stable national currency. • it was a powerful public institution.

  6. Question 5 All of the following were true of the Whiskey Rebellion EXCEPT • Hamilton’s high excise tax was designed to protect the western pioneers. • they regarded it not as a luxury tax but as a burden on an economic necessity and a medium of exchange. • defiant distillers finally erected whiskey poles, similar to the liberty poles of anti–stamp tax days in 1765. • rye and corn crops, distilled into alcohol, were more cheaply transported to eastern markets than bales of grain.

  7. Question 6 Washington’s Neutrality Proclamation was aimed at keeping America out of the war between • revolutionary France and England. • the United States and France after the XYZ affair. • Napoleonic France and England. • England and Spain.

  8. Question 7 All of the following were true of Jay Treaty’s EXCEPT • the British promised to evacuate the chain of posts on U.S. soil. • Britain consented to pay damages for the recent seizures of American ships. • Britain pledged to stop future maritime seizures and impressments and cease supplying arms to Indians. • the United States promised to pay the debts still owed to British merchants on pre-Revolutionary accounts.

  9. Question 8 All of the following were true of Washington’s Farewell Address EXCEPT • it helped in establishing a two-term tradition for American presidents. • Washington strongly advised the avoidance of “permanent alliances.” • Washington opposed all alliances, including “temporary alliances” for “extraordinary emergencies.” • it was never delivered orally but printed in the newspapers.

  10. Question 9 All of the following were true of the XYZ Affair EXCEPT • it sent a wave of war hysteria sweeping through the United States. • the slogan of the hour became “Millions for defense, but not one cent for tribute.” • Jeffersonians redoubled their support of their French friends. • the Navy Department was created, the three-ship navy was expanded, and the United States Marine Corps was reestablished.

  11. Question 10 All of the following were true of the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions EXCEPT • they were a Jeffersonian reaction to the Alien and Sedition Laws. • Jefferson feared that if the Federalists eradicated free speech and free press, they would wipe out other constitutional guarantees. • Jefferson reacted strongly because he had no fear that his own political party might be stamped out of existence. • both Jefferson and Madison stressed the compact theory—a theory popular among English political philosophers in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

  12. Answer 1 The leading figure in drafting the Bill of Rights was • Thomas Jefferson. • John Adams. • James Monroe. • James Madison. (correct) Hint: See page 201.

  13. Answer 2 Hamilton’s Plan of Funding at Par meant • the federal government paying off all federal debts. (correct) • the federal government paying off all state debts. • balancing the federal budget by cancelling federal debt. • balancing the federal budget by cancelling state debt. Hint: See page 202.

  14. Answer 3 Hamilton’s Assumption Plan meant • the federal government paying off all federal debts. • the federal government paying off all state debts. (correct) • balancing the federal budget by cancelling federal debt. • balancing the federal budget by cancelling state debt. Hint: See page 203.

  15. Answer 4 All of the following were true of the Bank of the United States EXCEPT • Hamilton took as his model the Bank of England. • the government would be the major stockholder and the federal Treasury would deposit its surplus monies. • the bank would print urgently needed paper money and thus provide a sound and stable national currency. • it was a powerful public institution. (correct) Hint: See page 204.

  16. Answer 5 All of the following were true of the Whiskey Rebellion EXCEPT • Hamilton’s high excise tax was designed to protect the western pioneers. (correct) • they regarded it not as a luxury tax but as a burden on an economic necessity and a medium of exchange. • defiant distillers finally erected whiskey poles, similar to the liberty poles of anti–stamp tax days in 1765. • rye and corn crops, distilled into alcohol, were more cheaply transported to eastern markets than bales of grain. Hint: See page 204.

  17. Answer 6 Washington’s Neutrality Proclamation was aimed at keeping America out of the war between • revolutionary France and England. (correct) • the United States and France after the XYZ affair. • Napoleonic France and England. • England and Spain. Hint: See page 210.

  18. Answer 7 All of the following were true of Jay Treaty’s EXCEPT • the British promised to evacuate the chain of posts on U.S. soil. • Britain consented to pay damages for the recent seizures of American ships. • Britain pledged to stop future maritime seizures and impressments and cease supplying arms to Indians. (correct) • the United States promised to pay the debts still owed to British merchants on pre-Revolutionary accounts. Hint: See page 213.

  19. Answer 8 All of the following were true of Washington’s Farewell Address EXCEPT • it helped in establishing a two-term tradition for American presidents. • Washington strongly advised the avoidance of “permanent alliances.” • Washington opposed all alliances, including “temporary alliances” for “extraordinary emergencies.” (correct) • it was never delivered orally but printed in the newspapers. Hint: See page 213.

  20. Answer 9 All of the following were true of the XYZ Affair EXCEPT • it sent a wave of war hysteria sweeping through the United States. • the slogan of the hour became “Millions for defense, but not one cent for tribute.” • Jeffersonians redoubled their support of their French friends. (correct) • the Navy Department was created, the three-ship navy was expanded, and the United States Marine Corps was reestablished. Hint: See pages 215–216.

  21. Answer 10 All of the following were true of the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions EXCEPT • they were a Jeffersonian reaction to the Alien and Sedition Laws. • Jefferson feared that if the Federalists eradicated free speech and free press, they would wipe out other constitutional guarantees. • Jefferson reacted strongly because he had no fear that his own political party might be stamped out of existence. (correct) • both Jefferson and Madison stressed the compact theory—a theory popular among English political philosophers in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Hint: See page 218.