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James Walkenhorst Solutions Architect Alliances and Solutions Marketing EMC Isilon Division PowerPoint Presentation
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James Walkenhorst Solutions Architect Alliances and Solutions Marketing EMC Isilon Division

James Walkenhorst Solutions Architect Alliances and Solutions Marketing EMC Isilon Division

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James Walkenhorst Solutions Architect Alliances and Solutions Marketing EMC Isilon Division

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  1. EMC ISILON vSphere 5 Best Practices James Walkenhorst Solutions Architect Alliances and Solutions Marketing EMC Isilon Division Cormac Hogan Technical Marketing Manager - Storage Cloud Infrastructure VMware

  2. Agenda • “Best Practices” FAQ • General Datastore Guidelines and Best Practices • Overview of NFS Datastores on Isilon • Isilon Best Practices for NFS Datastores • VMware Best Practices for NFS Datastores • Overview of iSCSI Datastores on Isilon • Isilon Best Practices for iSCSI Datastores • VMware Best Practices for iSCSI Datastores • VMware Best Practices for Optimal Network and Storage Access • Resources and Links • Q&A

  3. EMC-Isilon Storage Best-Practices FAQs • What is a Best Practice? A. An approach, validated through specific testing scenarios or observed frequently in customers’ environments, that produces an optimal outcome to a particular technical challenge. • Are Best Practices the same as Standards? • No. They simply represent an approach that is widely understood to produce the best possible outcome. • What are the benefits of observing Best Practices? • Reduced risk, faster root-cause analysis of issues, faster response times from support organizations, and the best chance of achieving optimal performance.

  4. General Best PracticesFor All Isilon-Based Datastores For optimal datastore performance and availability: • Network segmentation (e.g. VLANs) to separate VM network traffic from VMkernel storage traffic • Best practice for optimal performance • For optimal security, use an isolated (or trusted) network for all storage traffic • Test Jumbo frame (MTU=9000) performance in your environment • Fully supported by both VMware and EMC • Overall performance results depend on multiple variables • Use whichever configuration produces best overall performance • Use 10Gb/s Ethernet connections if possible for best performance • Use vSphere Storage I/O Control to manage VM storage utilization • Use Network I/O control to manage network bandwidth for storage traffic under heavy workloads

  5. General Best PracticesFor All Isilon-Based Datastores For optimal datastore performance and availability (continued): • Size your storage cluster first for performance, and then for capacity • Minimize the number of network hops between vSphere hosts and Isilon storage: • EMC recommends using the same subnet • Use the same switch, if possible • Ensure redundant network links exist between vSphere hosts and Isilon nodes for all datastores • HA path configuration and administration differs for each datastore type • Different workloads may require different storage configuration settings • Higher data protection levels vs. higher performance requirements • Analyze workload patterns for each application, if possible

  6. CDB CDB Data Data Jumbo Frames • Jumbo frames were not supported for NAS and iSCSI traffic on ESX 3.x. They were limited to data networking only (Virtual Machines and the VMotion network). • Jumbo frames are fully supportedfor NFS and iSCSI traffic on ESX 4 & 5. BHS • What do they do? • Jumbo frames allows for multiple PDUs to be combined into a single frame to improve throughput. CDB Data BHS CDB Data

  7. NFS Datastore Overview • VM data stored on file-based NFS mount, accessed using standard NFS v3.0 protocol • Datastore is automatically thin-provisioned • Advantages of NFS datastores: • Rapid, simple storage provisioning • No individual LUNs to manage • Datastore is immediately available upon creation • Multiple exports to the same mount point, using multiple interfaces, increase throughput and performance

  8. NFS Datastore Overview • VM data stored on file-based NFS mount, accessed using standard NFS v3.0 protocol • Datastore is automatically thin-provisioned • Advantages of NFS datastores: • Rapid, simple storage provisioning • Higher storage utilization rates • File system space not restricted to limitations of a single LUN • Larger storage pool for VMDK files to share

  9. NFS Datastore Overview • VM data stored on file-based NFS mount, accessed using standard NFS v3.0 protocol • Datastore is automatically thin-provisioned • Advantages of NFS datastores: • Rapid, simple storage provisioning • Higher storage utilization rates • Simplified management • No need to balance space usage across LUNs • VMs can be balanced across datastores based solely on bandwidth usage

  10. NFS Best PracticesOptimal Configuration for High Availability • Network Redundancy Options • Static Link Aggregation using 802.3ad LAG • Requires compatible switch and NIC hardware • Protects against NIC/path failures • Does not increase performance • SmartConnect Dynamic IP Address Pools • Automatically assigns IP addresses to member interfaces on each node • Interface or node failure causes SmartConnect to reassign IP address(es) to remaining nodes in the cluster • Datastore mapping can be IP-addressed based, or use DNS round-robin

  11. NFS Best PracticesOptimal Configuration for Performance • Throughput limits of a single datastore • Two TCP connections per datastore • One connection for NFS data flow • One connection for NFS control information • Datastore throughput is dependent on the available bandwidth

  12. NFS Best PracticesOptimal Configuration for Performance (continued) • Creating multiple datastores increases throughput • Best design uses mesh topology • Every vSphere host connects to every datastore • VMs can be created on any datastore to balance the I/O workload between hosts and cluster nodes

  13. NFS Configuration Gotcha #1 • ESXi supports NFS, but more specifically: • NFS version 3 only, no support for v2 or v4. • Over TCP only, no support for UDP. • The UI and ESXi logs will inform you if you attempt to use a version or protocol other than version 3 over TCP: NasVsi: 107: Command: (mount) Server: (madpat) IP: (10.16.156.25) Path: (/cormac) Label: (demo) Options: (None) WARNING: NFS: 1007: Server (10.16.156.25) does not support NFS Program (100003) Version (3) Protocol (TCP)

  14. NFS Configuration Gotcha #2 • Ensure that the admin who is mounting the NFS datastore on the ESXi host has appropriate permissions to do so. • If an admin attempts to mount a datastore without the correct permissions, the mount may be successful, but the first attempt to deploy a VM will fail as follows:

  15. Increasing Maximum Number of NFS mounts • Default configuration only allows for 8 NFS mounts per ESXi Server. • To enable more, start the vSphere Client, select the host from the inventory, and click Advanced Settings on the Configuration tab. • In the Advanced Settings dialog box, Net.TcplpHeapSize needs to be adjusted if NFS.MaxVolumesis increased or you may deplete heap. Symptoms from running out of heap are documented here: http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1007332

  16. NIC Teaming – Failover, not Load Balancing • There is only one active connection between the ESXi server and a single storage target (mount point). • This means that although there may be alternate connections available for failover, the bandwidth for a single datastore and the underlying storage is limited to what a single connection can provide. • To leverage more available bandwidth, there must be multiple connections from the ESXi server to the storage targets. • One would need to configure multiple datastores, with each datastore using separate connections between the server and the storage, i.e. NFS shares presented on different IP addresses.

  17. VLANs for Isolation & Security of NFS Traffic • Storage traffic is transmitted as clear text across the LAN. • Since ESXi 5.0 continues to use NFS v3, there is no built-in encryption mechanism for the traffic. • A best practice would be to use trusted networks for NFS. • This may possibly entail using separate physical switches or leverage a private VLAN.

  18. iSCSI Datastore Overview • iSCSI LUNs are constructed and treated as files within OneFS • Mounted over Ethernet network using iSCSI Initiators • EMC supports both thin and thick provisioning • Advantages of iSCSI datastores: • Raw-device mapping supported for VMs that require it • May provide better throughput performance for some workload types • iSCSI LUNs can be cloned for certain VM management scenarios

  19. iSCSI Best PracticesOptimal Configuration for High Availability • Network Redundancy Options • Leverage vSphere multipath plug-ins instead of LAG or SmartConnect Advanced • Use dedicated IP pool for iSCSI target IP management and connectivity • Enables segmentation of traffic between iSCSI and NFS workloads across the cluster

  20. iSCSI Best PracticesOptimal Configuration for High Availability (continued) • Network Redundancy Options • Create multiple VMkernel ports on vSphere hosts, with a single active network interface, then use port binding to associate those groups with the iSCSI initiator* • Set Path Selection Policy (PSP) to Fixed, and configure all hosts to use the same preferred path for each datastore • *Requires storage nodes and vSphere hosts to be on the same subnet

  21. iSCSI Best PracticesOptimal Configuration for Performance • Highly randomized workloads within a large LUN may benefit from setting the LUN’s access pattern to Streaming within OneFS • Consider using 2x mirroring protection to minimize parity calculation overhead on iSCSI write operations • If multiple storage pools are used, create iSCSI LUNs on each pool and assign VM data to tiered pools based on each VM’s performance requirements

  22. iSCSI Gotcha #1 - Routing • iSCSI traffic can be routed between an initiator and target only when iSCSI binding is not implemented. • If iSCSI binding is implemented, then you cannot route between an initiator and target; they must be on the same subnet. • This has been the cause of many Service Requests.

  23. iSCSI Gotcha #2 – Slow Boot on ESXi 5.0 • An issue was uncovered soon after ESXi 5.0 was released. • For hosts that used iSCSI, but where some initiators could not see all configured targets, the slow boot time was observed. • This was due to all initiators trying to login to every target, and retrying multiple times when it failed to do so. • The symptoms of the slow boot, and the patch resolution are described in this KB article – http://kb.vmware.com/kb/2007108

  24. Multipathing - Overview • Pluggable Storage Architecture - PSA • Native Multipathing Plugin – NMP • Storage Array Type Plugin – SATP • Path Selection Policy – PSP (follow vendor recommendations) • Some vendors provide their own plugin to the PSA, e.g. EMC’s PowerPath. Third-Party PSP

  25. iSCSI Multipathing – Best Practices • iSCSI binding ties a VMkernel port to a physical adapter and allows the PSA to implement multipathing on VMware’s Software iSCSI Adapter. • If you use iSCSI binding, then you cannot route between initiator and target; they must co-exist on the same subnet. • Do not create a NIC team when implementing iSCSI binding. • We want customers to consider storage resiliency based on multiple paths to the storage, rather than basing it on the number of networks available to a single storage path.

  26. Gotcha – Improper Device Removal • Improper removal of a physical device containing a VMFS or RDM could result in an APD (All Paths Dead) state. • Improvements have been made to ESX 4.x & 5.0. • Follow steps outlined in http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1015084 for ESX 4.x & http://kb.vmware.com/kb/2004605 for ESXi 5.0 when removing a datastore. RDM VMFS VMFS

  27. Storage I/O Control - Overview • Storage I/O Control is supported with both block & NFS datastores • Monitors I/O latency to both block (iSCSI, FC, FCoE) datastores & NFS datastores at each ESXi host sharing a physical device. • When the average normalized latency exceeds a set threshold (30ms by default), the datastore is considered to be congested. • If congested, SIOC distributes available storage resources to virtual machines in proportion to their configured shares. • Used to determine migration needs with Storage DRS in ESXi 5.0 • Troubleshooting Storage I/O Control: http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1022091

  28. Storage I/O Control Usage Scenario What you see What you want to see MicrosoftExchange MicrosoftExchange online store online store data mining data mining NFS / VMFS Datastore NFS / VMFS Datastore

  29. Network I/O Control - Overview • With converged networks, network traffic with different patterns and needs will merge together on the same network. • This may directly impact performance and predictability due to lack of isolation, scheduling & arbitration. • Network I/O Control can be used to prioritize different network traffic on the same pipe. • Network I/O Control also introduces the concept of user defined network groups. • This is quite useful for Virtual Machines, whereby an administrator can select which VM or group of VMs has the higher priority on the network. • Network I/O Control can be used on both NFS & iSCSI.

  30. Network I/O Control – Configuration UI NFS traffic can be given a higher priority than other traffic if contention arises

  31. Resources Links and Contact information • Everything VMware at EMC Community: http://emc.com/vmwarecommunity • VMware Storage blog: http://blogs.vmware.com/vSphere/Storage/ • EMC’s Best Practices for vSphere5 on Isilon storage white paper : http://www.isilon.com/file-handler/1729/library-emc-isilon-storage-and-vmware-vsphere-5.pdf • Additional questions james.walkenhorst@emc.com Thank you for attending!

  32. Q&A