modal verbs n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
MODAL VERBS PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
MODAL VERBS

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 13

MODAL VERBS - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 128 Views
  • Uploaded on

MODAL VERBS. These verbs have the following characteristics: -They are followed by an infinitive without 'to'. -They do not need auxiliaries for the interrogative or negative. -They do not take -s in the third person singular.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'MODAL VERBS' - quana


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
modal verbs
MODAL VERBS

These verbs have the following characteristics:

-They are followed by an infinitive without 'to'.

-They do not need auxiliaries for the interrogative or negative.

-They do not take -s in the third person singular.

-The exceptions to some of these rules are the verbs: ought to/ have to/ need to

modal verbs1
MODAL VERBS

All modals (will/would/shall/should/can/could/may/might/must) and the semi-modals (ought to/ have to) have only one form.

-Modals are followed by the infinitive (without 'to'): You should go to the doctor.

-The semi-modals 'have to' 'need to' change their form depending on the person and tenses: He said I needed to/had to rest.

-Modal verbs have different meanings: ability/ permission/ advice/ criticism/obligation/necessity/degrees of certainty.

modals ability
MODALS: ABILITY

CAN: Expresses ability in the present or generally: I can run a kilometre in four minutes.

It is used for decisions made about future ability: We can meet at the gym tomorrow.

COULD: Expresses ability in the past.

In sentences (if only) it expresses ability in the present, future and in general hypothetical situations: If only you could come

COULD HAVE+ PAST PTC: Expresses ability in past hypothetical situations: I could have roasted the turkey.

For other tenses: BE ABLE TO+INFINITIVE

modals permission
MODALS- PERMISSION

MAY (more polite than 'could'): May I go out?

COULD(more polite than 'can'): Could you repeat, please?

CAN(informal use): Can I go to the toilet?

These modal verbs express giving permission now or for the future.

For the past we have 'could' or 'be allowed to': I could go out with my friends/ I was allowed to go out with my friends.

modals advice
MODALS- ADVICE

SHOULD+ INFINITIVE / SHOULDN'T+ INFINITIVE

OUGHT TO

These verbs are used for giving advice now, for the future or generally:

You should go to the doctor now.

He ought to study for the exam.

They shouldn't buy things if they have little money.

modals degrees of certainty
MODALS- DEGREES OF CERTAINTY

MUST/CAN'T/COULDN'T} Express certainty about now or the future: That must be the new manager/ She can't be so old. She looks very young.

MUST/CAN'T/COULDN'T HAVE + PAST PTC} Express certainty about the past: She must have been in a lot of pain/ They couldn't have been on holiday for so long.

SHOULD/OUGHT TO} Express probability about now, the future or generally: You ought to feel better in a few days.

SHOULD/OUGHT TO HAVE+ PAST PTC} Express probability about the past: They bruises ought to have disappeared in a few days.

modals degree of certainty cont
MODALS- DEGREE OF CERTAINTY (CONT.)

COULD/MAY/MIGHT} Express possibility about now, the future or generally: You should talk to your doctor because that diet might be dangerous.

COULD/MAY/MIGHT HAVE+ PAST PTC} Express possibility about the past: That might have been the doctor who rang while we were out.

COULD/MIGHT HAVE+ PAST PTC} Express possibility about a hypothetical past: If you didn't follow your doctor's advice, you could have become quite ill.

modals criticism
MODALS- CRITICISM

SHOULD HAVE+ PAST PTC.

OUGHT TO HAVE+ PAST PTC.

These forms express a criticism of past behaviour.

He ought to have made more effort.

He should have eaten more before going out.

modals obligation and necessity
MODALS- OBLIGATION AND NECESSITY

MUST/ HAVE TO/ NEED TO} Express an obligation or necessity: I must /have to/need to study for the exam.

NEEDN'T/DON'T HAVE TO/DON'T NEED TO} Express no obligation or necessity: You needn't/don't have to/don't need to go to the shop. There is a lot of food in the fridge.

HAD TO} Expresses a past obligation: He had to study hard for his exams.

NEEDN'T HAVE+ PAST PTC} Expresses a lack of past obligation (an action that happened): They needn't have gone to the shop. There was plenty of food in the fridge.

modals degrees of certainty1
MODALS- DEGREES OF CERTAINTY

MUST/CAN'T/COULDN'T} Express certainty about now or the future: That must be the new manager/ She can't be so old. She looks very young.

MUST/CAN'T/COULDN'T HAVE + PAST PTC} Express certainty about the past: She must have been in a lot of pain/ They couldn't have been on holiday for so long.

SHOULD/OUGHT TO} Express probability about now, the future or generally: You ought to feel better in a few days.

SHOULD/OUGHT TO HAVE+ PAST PTC} Express probability about the past: They bruises ought to have disappeared in a few days.

modals degree of certainty cont1
MODALS- DEGREE OF CERTAINTY (CONT.)

COULD/MAY/MIGHT} Express possibility about now, the future or generally: You should talk to your doctor because that diet might be dangerous.

COULD/MAY/MIGHT HAVE+ PAST PTC} Express possibility about the past: That might have been the doctor who rang while we were out.

COULD/MIGHT HAVE+ PAST PTC} Express possibility about a hypothetical past: If you didn't follow your doctor's advice, you could have become quite ill.

use a suitable modal verb in these sentences
Use a suitable modal verb in these sentences

I (not watch) the screen. You (take) off your hat, please?

Some dinosaurs (eat) a ton of meat a day.

You (do) the washing up. I've already done it.

He's a very good student. I'm sure he (pass) without difficulty.

Yesterday Peter (not get) to school in time for the exam.

He (solve) very hard mathematics problems. He (be) very clever.

I'm busy right now. You (phone) again later, please?

But you've jist had lunch. You (not be) hungry yet.

If you don't tell me the truth, you (stay) at home for the weekend.

continuation
Continuation.

Peter is very weak at English. He (study) harder.

When my father was a child, he (go) to bed at nine every evening.

Your car is a very old model. You (buy) a new one.

Mother to son: You (not eat) with your elbows on the table.

I (have) a word with you, sir?

Peter (persuade) his father to let him come with us.

If you travel abroad you (take) traveller's cheques with you.

If you go to London, you (visit) the British Museum.

I (not speak) German, but I (speak) English fluently.