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Équipe #1 Prince Jean-Michel Saint-Pierre Charles-Philippe Savall Arnaud. Just say no to wall street by joseph fuller & michael c. jensen. Summary. An Overvalued Stock Damages A Company The Case Of Enron The Case Of Nortel Networks Restarting the conversation.

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quipe 1 prince jean michel saint pierre charles philippe savall arnaud
Équipe #1

Prince Jean-Michel

Saint-Pierre Charles-Philippe

Savall Arnaud

Just say no to wall streetby joseph fuller &michael c. jensen

summary
Summary

An Overvalued Stock Damages A Company

The Case Of Enron

The Case Of Nortel Networks

Restarting the conversation

an overvalued stock damages a company
An Overvalued Stock Damages A Company

Enron, Cisco, and Nortel: analysts pushed these

companies to reach for higher and higher growth

Targets; generated long-term damage.

managers must abandon the notion that a higher stock price is always better and recognize that an overvalued stock can be as dangerous to a company as an undervalued stock.

management of investor expectations means being

willing to take the necessary actions to eliminate such

overvaluation when it occurs.

an overvalued stock damages a company1
An Overvalued Stock Damages A Company

In his first meeting with analysts after taking over Gillette, James Kilts stood firm against the tide refusing to be forced into making predictions for his company.

By taking positions that we believe will benefit all the players in this game, Kilts and Diller have seized an important opportunity— even an obligation—to reshape and reframe the conversation for a new era.

an overvalued stock damages a company2
An Overvalued Stock Damages A Company

Over the last decade companies have struggled

more and more desperately to meet analysts’ expectations.

Caught up by a buoyant economy and the pace of value creation set by the market’s best performers, analysts challenged the companies they covered to reach for unprecedented earnings growth.

Executives often acquiesced to increasingly unrealistic projections and adopted them as a basis for setting goals for their organizations.

an overvalued stock damages a company3
An Overvalued Stock Damages A Company

Several reasons executives played this game: favorable market conditions in many industries, which enabled companies to exceed historical performance levels and, in the process, allowed executives and analysts alike to view unsustainable levels of growth as the norm.

A massive, broadbased shift in the philosophy of executive compensation, stock options became an increasing part of executive compensation.

High share prices and earnings multiples stoked endowed managerial egos.

an overvalued stock damages a company4
An Overvalued Stock Damages A Company

In recent times, analysts became media darlings

The views of celebrity analysts were accorded the same weight as the opinions of leading executives

Analysts shared in the bonus pools of their investment banking divisions and thus had incentives to issue reports favorable to their banks’ deals.

In sum, analysts had strong incentives to demand high growth and steady and predictable earnings performance, both to justify sky-high valuations for the companies they followed and to avoid damage to their own reputations from missed predictions

an overvalued stock damages a company5
An Overvalued Stock Damages A Company

What’s the harm?

Vicious cycle can impose real, lasting costs on companies when analyst expectations become unhinged from what is possible for firms to accomplish.

Companies participating in markets with 4% underlying growth in demand cannot register 15% growth in earnings quarter over quarter, year over year, indefinitely.

When the fiction finally becomes obvious, the result is massive adjustments in earnings and growth projections and, consequently, in equity valuations.

slide9

ENRON WAS IN MANY WAYS A EXTRAORDINARY COMPANY

    • - Genuine achievements
    • - dramatic innovations
    • - promising long-run future
    • - Taking advantage of deregulating market
    • Wall Street responded:
      • Positives reports
      • High valuations
      • But also set some very agressive targets.

The Case Of Enron

the case of enron

Peak valuation of $68 billion (Aug. 2001) required to grow its free cash flow at a 91% annually for the next 6 years.

  • “(...)to meet such expectations, it expanded
  • into areas, including water, broadband, and even
  • weather insurance, in which it had no specific assets,
  • expertise, or experience.”
The Case Of Enron
slide11

“[...]managers can refuse to collude with analysts’ expectations when they don’t fit with their strategies and the underlying realities of their markets.” - James Kilts, CEO Gillette

Consequences:

avoided questionable actions

a lower-valued company, but a stable and profitable

The Case Of Enron

the case of nortel networks

Nortel acquired 19 companies between 1997 and early 2001.

“[...] stock price soared (to reach a total capital value of $277 billion in July 2000), it came under pressure to do deals to satisfy the analysts’ growth expectations.”

The quest to transform Nortel clearly damaged

this former mainstay of the telecommunication sector.

The Case Of Nortel Networks
consequences

value-destroying investments

costs for the financial community

crisis of confidence

Questionable practices

“[...] potential conflict of interest between the investment banking and the security analysis sides of investment banks.”

Consequences
restarting the conversation
Restarting the conversation
  • Requirement for putting an end to this destructive cycle:
    • For manager :
      • Confront the capital market with courage and conviction
      • Don’t bow to analyst’demands for highly predectable earning
      • Be forthright and promise only promise reachable results
      • Dispel any air of unreality
      • Recognize that overvalued stock can be damaging to the long health of the compagny
      • Be transparent to investors and the markets
      • Address the « unexplained » part of their firm’s share price
      • Reconcile thier own compagny’s projection to those of the industry and their rivals’ projection
      • Remember that analysts are not always wrong
restarting the conversation1
Restarting the conversation
  • Requirement for putting an end to this destructive cycle:
    • For analysts :
      • Include the phenomena like seasonality, cycliclaty ,and ramdom events
      • Compagny can’t grow in a constant fashion
restarting the conversation2
Restarting the conversation
  • In response to such value destruction :
    • Wave of hostile acquisitions and LBOs
  • The price that WS puts on compagny’s securities affect :
    • The strategies of the firm
    • Cost of capital
    • Borrowing capacity
    • Ability to make acquisition
    • Ultimatly, the viability of the compagny
    • Wave of hostile acquisitions and LBOs