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Valuing the Richness that Diversity Brings. Hanukkah Explained. Aims of the presentation. To provide information for employees around Hanukkah. Based on the organisations values and principles of valuing the richness that diversity brings.

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Valuing the richness that diversity brings

Valuing the Richness that Diversity Brings

Hanukkah Explained

this is one in a series of presentations for Information


Aims of the presentation

this is one in a series of presentations for Information

Aims of the presentation

  • To provide information for employees around Hanukkah.

  • Based on the organisations values and principles of valuing the richness that diversity brings.

  • We believe it is important that employees of the PCT understand the religious and cultural traditions of the people we serve and of those we work with in line with Employment Equality (Religion and Belief) Regulations 2003 and the Equality Act 2006.


What is hanukkah
What is Hanukkah?

  • Hanukkah also known as the Festival of Lights, is an eight-day Jewish Holiday commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd Century BCE. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maccabean_Revolt)‏

  • Hanukkah is observed for eight nights, starting on the 25th day of Kislev according to the Hebrew calendar, and may occur from late November to late December on the Gregorian calendar. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kislev)‏

  • In 2007 Hanukkah commenced at sunset on December 4th to sunset on December 12th.

  • The first Day of Hanukkah 2007 is December 5.

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Hanukkah
Hanukkah

  • The festival is observed by the kindling of the lights of a special candelabrum, the Hanukiah, or Hanukkah Menorah, one on each night of the holiday, progressing to eight on the final night.

  • An extra light called a shamash, which in Hebrew means "guard" or "servant“ is also lit each night, and is given a distinct location, usually higher or lower than the others. The purpose of the extra light is to adhere to the prohibition, specified in the Talmud which is a record of discussions pertaining to Jewish Law, ethics, customs, and history. This prohibition is against using the Hanukkah lights for anything other than publicizing and meditating on the Hanukkah story.

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Celebrations during hanukkah

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Celebrations during Hanukkah

  • Lighting candles each night in a Hanukkah menorah.

  • Singing special songs, such as Ma'oz Tzur (a Jewish poem written in Hebrew).

  • Reciting Hallel prayer which consists of six Psalms (113-118), which are said on joyous occasions such as Hanukkah.


Celebrations during hanukkah1

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Celebrations during Hanukkah

  • Eating festive meals and foods fried in oil, such as latkes (potato pancakes) and sufganiyot (ball shaped doughnuts).

  • The dreidel game is played by children on Hanukkah and consists of a four-sided spinning top which has each side is imprinted with a Hebrew letter.

  • Giving Hanukkah gelt – Yiddish for money is often distributed to children to enhance their enjoyment of the holiday period. The amount is usually in small coins, although grandparents or other relatives may give larger sums as an official Hanukkah gifts.


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  • It is hoped that this information will help colleagues to gain more understanding of what Hanukkah means to our Colleagues who are of the Jewish Faith.

  • Jules Wall

  • Diversity and Equality Manager

  • Blackburn with Darwen Teaching Primary Care Trust


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