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Essential Skills and the Ontario Skills Passport http://skills.edu.gov.on.ca. Ontario Skills Passport (OSP). Essential Skills … . are used in virtually all occupations and throughout daily life are transferable from school to work, job to job and sector to sector help people adapt to change

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essential skills and the ontario skills passport http skills edu gov on ca

Essential Skills and the Ontario Skills Passporthttp://skills.edu.gov.on.ca

essential skills
Essential Skills …
  • are used in virtually all occupations and throughout daily life
  • are transferable from school to work, job to job and sector to sector
  • help people adapt to change
  • provide people with a foundation for learning other skills, like technical skills and job/workplace specific skills.
why these skills are essential
Why These Skills Are Essential
  • Generic skillsused in virtually all occupations and throughout daily life in different forms and at different levels of complexity.
  • They are transferablefrom school to work, job to job and sector to sector.
  • They provide the foundation for learning other skills, such as technical skills and job/workplace specific skills.
  • Enablepeople to perform tasks required by their jobs as well as adapt to change.
tasks
TASKS

List 4 items that are on your WORK “to do” list that you have to attend to today.

skills
SKILLS

What skills do you have to use in order to complete each of those tasks?

reading text
Reading Text
  • Refers to the comprehension of text consisting of sentences and paragraphs.
    • Notes
    • Letters
    • Memos
    • Manuals
    • Books
    • Etc.
writing
Writing
  • Means the preparation of written materials for a variety of purposes.
    • Writing notes
    • Filling in forms
    • Writing an e-mail
    • Creating reports
document use
Document Use
  • Refers to tasks that use a variety of information displays
    • Pictures
    • Icons
    • Tables
    • Graphs
    • Lists
    • Blueprints
    • Maps
computer use
Computer Use
  • The use of any type of computerized technology. Applications of Computer Use include varying levels of interaction with:
    • Computer-controlled equipment
    • Software programs
    • Information technology systems
oral communication
Oral Communication
  • Pertains to the use of speech to give and exchange thoughts and information
    • Conversations
    • Seeking or obtaining information
    • Leading a group
    • Providing comfort or reassurance
recognize that essential skill
Recognize That Essential Skill?

In your groups:

  • Complete the Task
  • Decide which Essential Skill is being showcased.
task 1
Task 1

Essential Skill Demonstrated:

Document Use (2)

task 2
Task 2

Answers will vary. Possible answer:

Dear Erick,

On behalf of Project Read, we would sincerely like to thank you for participating in the Family Literacy Day event on January 27th. Your presence and songs inspired families to join the “Read In” and other activities throughout the day. We really appreciated your talents and support.

Thank you,

[name signed here]

Essential Skill Demonstrated:

Writing (2) Additional Skills: Document Use (2)

numeracy skills
Numeracy Skills
  • Money Math
  • Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting
  • Measurement and Calculation
  • Data Analysis
  • Numerical Estimation
money math
Money Math
  • Refers to the use of mathematical skills in making financial transactions
    • handling cash
    • preparing bills
    • making payments
scheduling or budgeting and accounting
Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting
  • Planning for the best use of time and money, as well as monitoring of the use of time and money.
measurement and calculation
Measurement and Calculation
  • The measurement and calculation of quantities, areas, volumes, and/or distances.
data analysis
Data Analysis
  • The collection and analysis of data in numerical form.
numerical estimation
Numerical Estimation
  • The production of estimates in numerical terms.
recognize that essential skill1
Recognize That Essential Skill?

In your groups:

  • Complete the Task
  • Decide which Essential Skill is being showcased.
task 11
Task 1

$8,243.95 savings

Essential Skills Demonstrated:

Measurement and Calculation (3)

Additional Skills: Document Use (2)

one way to get this answer
One way to get this answer...

1. Identify what is required: the cost savings to the client.

2. Find the number of square feet to be tiled.

3. Locate the column “Item or Description” in the Estimate Detail Form.

4. Scan the column for the key word “tile”.

5. Decide that 650 SQ’ is the number of square feet to be tiled.

6. Identify what is required: 10% for waste allowance on materials.

7. Set up the problem to find the total required including waste allowance: (square feet x waste percentage) + square feet = square feet to be tiled including waste allowance.

8. Calculate: (650 x 10%) + 650 = 715 square feet.

9. Identify what is required: the cost for porcelain and ceramic tiles to cover 715 square feet.

10. Set up the problem to find the cost for porcelain tiles: price / sq. ft. Coverage x 715 square feet = cost for porcelain tiles to cover 715 square feet.

11. Calculate: $16.25 x 715 = $11,618.75.

12. Set up problem to find the cost for ceramic tiles: price / sq. ft. Coverage x 715 square feet = cost for ceramic tiles to cover 715 square feet.

13. Calculate: $4.72 sq. ft. x 715 = $3,374.80.

14. Identify what is required: the cost savings to the client by using ceramic tiles.

15. Set up the problem to find the cost difference: Total porcelain price for coverage – Total ceramic price for coverage = cost savings.

16. Calculate: $11,618.75 - $3,374.80 = $8,243.95.

17. Decide the savings to the customer would be $8,243.95.

task 21
Task 2

At least 72 golfers are required to meet the target profit.

Essential Skills Demonstrated:

Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting (2)

one way to get this answer1
One way to get this answer...

1. Identify what is required: minimum number of golfers required to meet the target profit.

2. Scan the task statement for minimum profit required.

3. Locate $2,500.

4. Scan the task statement to find the cost that golfers will pay for the event.

5. Locate $90.

6. Scan the task statement to find the profit earned per golfer for the event.

7. Locate $35.

8. Set up problem: (minimum number of golfers x $35) = $2,500.

9. Calculate: (X x $35) = $2,500. 2,500 / 35 = X. 2,500 / 35 = 71.43.

10. Decide that at least 72 golfers are required to meet the target profit of $2,500.

thinking skills
Thinking Skills
  • Job Task Planning and Organizing
  • Decision Making
  • Problem Solving
  • Finding Information
job task planning and organizing
Job Task Planning and Organizing
  • The planning and organization of one’s own work.
decision making
Decision Making
  • The making of any type of decision, using appropriate information.
problem solving
Problem Solving
  • The identification and solving of problems.
finding information
Finding Information
  • The use of a variety of sources, including written text, people, computerized databases, and information systems.
choose that essential skill
Choose That Essential Skill...

Working in pairs, decide which Essential Skill is being demonstrated in each of these activities.

choose that essential skill1
Choose That Essential Skill...

Working in pairs, decide which Essential Skill is being demonstrated in each of these activities.

skills1
Skills
  • What skills do you have to use in order to complete each of those tasks?
  • For each task, prioritize the skills:
    • MOST important
    • Next important
    • Is there a 3rd critical skill?
essential skill levels
Essential Skill Levels
  • We use our Essential Skills everyday but we also use them at different levels of complexity or skill levels when performing tasks.
  • Skill levels indicate the level of complexity involved in the use of a skill in a particular task.
complexity rating scale
Complexity Rating Scale
  • The Complexity Rating Scale indicates the level of complexity involved in the use of a skill in a particular task.
  • The least complex tasks are classified at level 1; the most complex tasks are classified at level 5 or at level 4 if there are only 4 levels for a skill.

Skill levels are associated with workplace tasks and not the worker performing these tasks.

essential skill levels1
Essential Skill Levels

“Why is this so hard?” card game

card game part 1
Card Game (Part 1)
  • Shuffle the deck of cards.
  • Find the Ace of Spades.
  • Once you are done, think about the process.
card game part 1 locating
Card Game (Part 1)Locating
  • In Part 1 of the card game, there was a direct match between the visual of the card (Ace of Spades) and the card you needed to locate in the deck.
  • This strategy is known as “locating.”
card game part 2
Card Game (Part 2)
  • Shuffle the deck.
  • Locate all four aces.
  • Once you are done, think about the process.
card game part 2 cycling
Card Game (Part 2)Cycling
  • In Part 2 of the card game, you had to find the four aces (A♥, A♦, A♣, and A♠).
  • This strategy is known as “cycling.”
  • Increased time was required to complete the task.
card game part 3
Card Game (Part 3)
  • Put all the cards back in the deck and shuffle.
  • Find all the diamonds and place the cards in order from A (low) to K (high).
  • Once you are done, think about the process.
card game part 3 integrating
Card Game (Part 3)Integrating
  • In Part 3 of the card game, you were asked to find all the diamonds and place the cards in order from A (low) to K (high).
  • This task involves multiple “locates” but this time you also had to manipulate, or process, the cards by sequencing them.
  • This strategy is known as “integrate.”
card game part 4
Card Game (Part 4)
  • Put all the cards back in the deck and shuffle.
  • Identify the highest-scoring hand for each of the three most popular card games in North America.
  • Once you are done, think about the process.
card game part 4 generating
Card Game (Part 4)Generating
  • In Part 4 of the card game, you were asked to identify the highest-scoring hand for each of the three most popular card games in North America.
  • This task was the most challenging because it depended on using your prior knowledge to complete the task.
  • You had to “generate” the answer in your own head.
card game review
Card Game (Review)
  • The card game illustrates the strategies of locating, cycling, integrating and generating.
  • This demonstrates the kinds of analysis that went into determining the Essential Skills complexity levels.
  • Tasks that require only locating are considered easier than tasks that require cycling, integrating or generating.
task complexity
Task Complexity

What makes tasks more or less difficult?

The difficulty level of a task depends on how easy or hard it is to find the answer.

task complexity1

Task Complexity

Task Complexity

Straightforward tasks (Level 1, 2)

Learner finds key words in the question and matches those words with the exact same words in the workplace document.

Learner does not need to have a strong understanding of the document format to find the answer.

task complexity2
Task Complexity

Examples:

  • What is the patient’s name?Tim Aalto
  • What is the nutrition diet?Minced Diabetic
task complexity3
Task Complexity

More difficult tasks

Learner must

  • locate multiple pieces of information
  • compare information from different areas of the same document
  • integrate information from different areas of the same document
  • generate information

Learner needs to understand the document type or format.

task complexity4
Task Complexity

Level 1, 2 :

Locating multiple pieces of information

Example:

Which floor coverings can be installed 16 to 24 hours after application?

carpet, vinyl sheet goods…

task complexity5
Task Complexity

Level 2:

Comparing information from different areas of the same document

Making inferences

Example:

What salads were ordered?

house caesar

house greens

task complexity6
Task Complexity

Level 2, 3:

Integrating information from different areas of the same document or two documents

Example:

Greg Raymond is a driver who has lost his CVOR Certificate. His RIN is 349 445 234. He is paying for a replacement using his credit card. Complete the application.

exercise
Exercise

Put the tasks in order of complexity from 1 to 5.

  • Read a short email to find out what time a meeting is
  • Read and critique technical reports, research papers and journal articles written by co-workers and colleagues.
  • Proofread and edit a friend’s résumé and cover letter for correct grammar and content.
  • Read an article in a newsletter to learn about upcoming or past events.
  • Read consumer product reviews from various websites and magazines to make purchasing decisions.
essential skills profiles
Essential Skills Profiles
  • Essential Skills Profiles describe how each skill is used in an occupation.
  • Researchers asked workers:

- What do you do in your job?

- Why do you do it?

- How do you do it?

- What resources and materials do you use?

  • There are presently 385 profiles on the OSP Website.
components of an essential skills profile
Components of an Essential Skills Profile
  • Brief description of the occupation
  • List of the most important Essential Skills
  • Typical tasks grouped by skill and skill level
  • Physical aspects of performing the job and the attitudes that workers feel are needed to do the job well
  • Future trends affecting Essential Skill requirements for the occupation
  • Links to sites with information on this occupation, such as the National Occupational Classification Matrix (NOC) and Job Futures
small group exercise
Small Group Exercise
  • Review the OSP Occupational Profile
  • What are the 3 most important Essential Skills for this occupation?
  • What three components are common throughout the profile in describing each of the Essential Skills?
  • What is the range of skill level required?
  • What measuring instruments would they use?
  • What computer skills would they need?
  • What attitudes are required?
essential skills are transferable
Essential Skills are transferable

Essential Skills are called transferable skills because you can transfer them (or take them with you) from school to work, further education or training, and to your everyday life; they are also transferable from job to job.

review
Review
  • There are 14 Essential Skills in the OSP.
  • Essential Skills have skill levels.
  • Essential Skills Profiles.
  • Essential Skills are the foundation for learning other skills, like technical skills and job/workplace specific skills.
  • Essential Skills are also called transferable skills.