So, You Want To Be An Animal Owner - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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So, You Want To Be An Animal Owner

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  1. So, You Want To Be An Animal Owner Developed by : Holly George, University of California Extension ServiceSusie Kocher, University of California Extension Service Bruce Miller, Utah State University Melody Hefner, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension NRCS, Bozeman, MT

  2. We’ll be covering: • What are the legal considerations? • Why have animals? • What do animals cost, in terms of time and money? • What do animals need? • What can your land support? www.farmphoto.com

  3. What are my legal limitations?

  4. Legal considerations • Zoning • Special use permits • Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions – CC&Rs • Local ordinances

  5. Zoning • Imposed by local government. • Agricultural, urban, rural, commercial. • Each zone has regulations on animals, some may require a permit.

  6. Special use permits • Required in some zones • Require application and environmental review • Require information about your property • May be denied or granted with special conditions

  7. Covenants, Conditions, & Restrictions (CC&Rs) • Some neighborhoods restrict animals through CC&Rs

  8. Local ordinances • Right-to-farm ordinances • Open range ordinances www.farmphoto.com

  9. Your property • Zoning • CC&Rs • Grazing NRCS, Bozeman, MT

  10. Why have animals? www.farmphoto.com

  11. Animal OwnershipPros Cons

  12. Balancing pros and cons

  13. Is it worth it? UNCE, Reno, NV

  14. Articulating your goals • Why do I want a …? • What kind of ….? • How much time do I have to spend with a …..? • Where would I keep a …? • Other options?

  15. What does it cost to keep an animal? USU, Logan, UT

  16. Animal costs: Horse • Initial costs • Operational costs NRCS, Bozeman, MT

  17. Horse Costs

  18. Horse time costs • Maintaining animals • Maintaining facilities www.freeyellow.com

  19. Maintaining animals • Feeding • Exercising • Handling www.farmphoto.com www.mmfarms.com

  20. Horse Care Time Requirements

  21. Maintaining facilities • Fence maintenance • Pasture • Irrigation • Trailers and trucks • Barn/shelter www.agry.purdue.edu/ext

  22. How else can your goals for horse ownership be satisfied? Alternatives to ownership

  23. Example: Riding Lessons

  24. Balance the pros and cons before deciding UNCE, Reno, NV www.farmphoto.com

  25. What do animals need? USU, Logan UT

  26. Animal needs and resources • Food • Water • Space • Shelter • Health care • TLC www.farmphoto.com

  27. Feed/forage costs • How much forage will my land provide? www.farmphoto.com

  28. Forage production depends on: • Climate and moisture • Soil type • Your management system • Irrigation availability NRCS, Bozeman, MT

  29. Annualforage production estimates

  30. Forage production estimation • Use previous table • Use soil survey crop yield report • Use local production figures (USFS, NRCS, County Ag Reports, etc.)

  31. Animal needs and resources • Food • Water • Space • Shelter • Health care • TLC www.farmphoto.com

  32. All animals need water • Water needs will vary by animal size, reproductive status and weather • Average animal needs: • Beef cow or horse– 12 gallons/day • Pig – 8 gallons/day • Llama – 5 gallons/day • Sheep or goat – 4 gallons/day • These needs may double on hot days

  33. How will you get water to your animals? UCES

  34. Animal watering considerations • Type and location of available water source(s) • Site location and condition • Type of grazing system • Number of livestock • Access to power source • Pumping system • Flexibility and portability • Reliability and maintenance • Temporary or seasonal water storage • Cost – including maintenance • Personal preference

  35. Where should I put my animals’ water? • Water source should be located away from shade, food and minerals • Water systems may be subject to local regulations • Stock watering source should be at least 100 feet or more away from open water sources, wellheads and septic systems

  36. What are my stock watering options? • Stream or pond water gaps • Springs • Water hauling • Water troughs or tanks – with or without automated pumps • Nose pumps • Automatic waterers - Swine

  37. Stream or pond access ramps

  38. Stream or pond access ramps Stream or pond access ramps Adapted from www.agric.gov.ab.ca

  39. Stream or pond access ramps NRCS, Bozeman, MT

  40. Springs NRCS, Bozeman, MT www.rwrp.umt.edu

  41. Water hauling USU, Logan, UT www.agry.purdue.edu/ext

  42. Water troughs or tanks www.agry.purdue.edu/ext www.farmphoto.com

  43. Pipeline systems www.agry.purdue.edu/ext Buried line Surface line

  44. Pipeline system pumping options • Gravity feed systems • Solar powered pumps • Windmill pumping systems • Gas or diesel powered pumps

  45. Gravity feed pumping systems www.agry.purdue.edu/ext www.agry.purdue.edu/ext www.agric.gov.ab.ca

  46. Solar powered pumps www.agric.gov.ag.ca www.agry.purdue.edu/ext

  47. Windmill pumping systems www.agric.gov.ab.ca www.farmphoto.com

  48. Gas or diesel powered pumps www.agric.gov.ab.ca www.agry.purdue.edu/ex/

  49. Nose pumps www.agry.purdue.edu/ext www.agry.purdue.edu/ext/ www.agric.gov.ab.ca

  50. Automatic waterers - swine www.agry.purdue.edu/ext www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu www.edstrom.com