powerpoint pointers n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
PowerPoint Pointers PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
PowerPoint Pointers

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 24

PowerPoint Pointers - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 117 Views
  • Uploaded on

PowerPoint Pointers. Or Public Speaking: A Fear Worse than Death Jennifer Cline and Daniel Linzer Spring 2009 Freshman Seminar. Today’s Agenda. Your upcoming presentations What we expect Why so many days Writing PowerPoint presentations Public speaking basics.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Pointers


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
powerpoint pointers

PowerPoint Pointers

Or

Public Speaking:

A Fear Worse than Death

Jennifer Cline and Daniel Linzer

Spring 2009

Freshman Seminar

today s agenda
Today’s Agenda
  • Your upcoming presentations
    • What we expect
    • Why so many days
  • Writing PowerPoint presentations
  • Public speaking basics
how to get an a on your presentation
How to Get an A on Your Presentation
  • Your assignment
    • In 7-10 minutes, present
      • Compelling claim
      • Distinctive example
      • Context
  • Do these things very well
1 compelling claims news
1. Compelling Claims = News
  • “So what, who cares, what’s in it for me?”
  • Here’s how scientists think
    • State significance of topic
    • Tell what we already know
      • Keep it relevant
    • Point out gap
    • Outline current research
2 examples are your data
2. Examples are Your Data
  • Claim = conclusion you draw based on data
  • Show us how to interpret your results
  • Make us trust your data; we’ll buy the claim
3 context puts you in the debate
3. Context Puts You in the Debate
  • Professional researcher’s work adds to the body of knowledge
    • Remember how scientist’s think …

How does yours?

writing presentations designing a talk
Writing PresentationsDesigning a Talk
  • Planning
  • writing
  • Revising
  • Editing

Practice, practice, practice!

planning the talk it s not about you
Planning the TalkIt’s Not about YOU
  • What does your audience need?
    • What it is to not know
    • Talk to them before
    • List their questions
  • Move from what’s known to what’s new
take command of the tools

Well-Lit Rooms

Dimly-Lit Rooms

Take Command of the Tools
  • Don’t be a slave to software!
    • Reset “auto fit,” etc.
    • Excel defaults ≠ best practices
  • Pick a design template carefully
    • What image do I want to portray?
    • What is the room like?
writing slides practical tips for success
Writing SlidesPractical Tips for Success

Five Rules to Prevent PowerPoint Overload

  • Signal with clear headlines
  • Segment into logical chunks
  • Move narrative ↓ so you can talk and show
  • Make images and words do double duty
  • Tell one story
    • Intro, body, and conclusion Atkinson and Mayer 2004
write a story board not a script or outline
Write a Story Board, Not a Script or Outline
  • Use headlines
    • Clearly signal what is important
    • Outline
    • Preview
    • Repeat
plan in chunks
Plan in Chunks
  • Segments help the learner
    • Bite sized chunks of info
  • Use the slide sorter
moving toward revising editing reduce visual overload
Moving toward revising, editing … Reduce Visual Overload
  • Use many modes
    • Talk to the audience
    • Move narrative to notes pages
  • Make slides do double duty
    • Work for speaker with cues
      • Words and images
    • Work for audience
      • Having both increases learning
edit ruthlessly murder your darlings
Edit RuthlesslyMurder Your Darlings!
  • Too much info overwhelms
    • On each slide
    • In each talk
  • Tell one story
    • Keep only what supports key message
does your draft measure up
Does Your Draft Measure Up?

Five Rules to Prevent PowerPoint Overload

  • Signal with clear headlines
  • Segment into logical chunks
  • Move narrative ↓ so you can talk and show
  • Make images and words do double duty
  • Tell one story
    • Intro, body, and conclusion

Atkinson and Mayer 2004

practice practice practice public speaking basics
Practice, Practice, Practice!Public Speaking Basics

A presentation is a speech

  • Opening
    • Get attention, preview, perspective
  • Body
    • Simple, not simplistic
    • Tell a story
  • Conclusions
    • Don’t just stop
research is persuasive rhetoric
Research is Persuasive Rhetoric
  • Aristotle’s three forms of persuasion
    • Ethos
    • Pathos
    • Logos
aristotle on ethos
Aristotle on Ethos

Persuasion is achieved by the speaker's personal character when the speech is so spoken as to make us think him credible

We believe good men more fully and more readily than others: this is true generally whatever the question is, and absolutely true where exact certainty is impossible and opinions are divided. . .

[C]haracter may almost be called the most effective means of persuasion he possesses

Aristotle, Rhetoric 1.2.1356a.4-2

ethos is
Ethos is . . .
  • Developed in the message
  • Dynamic
  • A caused response
eliciting positive ethos
Eliciting Positive Ethos
  • Be prepared
    • Know the logistics and message
  • Be natural
  • Be honest
  • Be lively
  • Be appropriate
appropriate non verbal communication
Appropriate Non-Verbal Communication
  • Appropriate dress and demeanor
  • Eye contact = trust
  • Good posture enhances breathing and voice
  • Move or gesture to underscore meaning
  • Contained energy
let s practice
Let’s Practice!
  • In 5 minutes, construct a 1-2 minute talk
    • Opening
      • Get attention, outline, why “important”
    • Body
      • Supporting evidence, detail
    • Conclusion
      • Highlight take home message
      • Strong finish
  • Peers keep time, provide 2-3 minutes of positive feedback on content and style
if you learn only 3 things
If You Learn Only 3 Things …

1. Planning is key

  • Know your message, logistics, and what the audience needs

2. End strong

3. Practice, practice, practice!

  • It helps overcome nerves
  • Hearing it out loud helps revise and edit
  • Ask a colleague to listen to and critique your talk