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Ready-to-Use Strategies for Improving Students’ Writing Skills. 9 th Annual Title Programs Conference Atlanta, Georgia June 15, 2011. Making Education Work for All Georgians. Rationale. Written expression is part of high stakes state and national assessments.

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ready to use strategies for improving students writing skills

Ready-to-Use Strategies for Improving Students’ Writing Skills

9th Annual Title Programs Conference

Atlanta, Georgia

June 15, 2011

rationale
Rationale

Written expression is part of high stakes state and national assessments.

Third, 5th, 8th, and 11th graders must pass a writing proficiency test.

Literacy, including writing, is a major focus of the CCGPS.

the teaching of writing process
The [Teaching of] Writing Process

Building written expression skills in an on-going process that involves:

  • Preteaching vocabulary
  • Sequencing instruction
  • Providing structured writing tasks
  • Scaffolding instruction
writing not handwriting
Writing, NOT HANDWRITING!

Take the pencil out of the process:

  • Make use of manipulatives
  • Allow word processors
  • Consider voice to written text
  • Use a scribe
preteach vocabulary
Preteach Vocabulary
  • Start with the concrete
    • Match words with pictures
    • Model actions
  • Organize vocabulary into synonym groups
    • Fast, quick, speedy, rapid, swift, brisk, sudden
preteach vocabulary7
Preteach Vocabulary
  • Teacher selects 3-5 academic vocabulary words from a reading selection.
  • Students use a Vocabulary Knowledge Rating Chart* to self-assess their familiarity with the words.
  • Teacher facilitates as students engage in accountable, structured responses.

*Used with permission of Kate Kinsella, Ed.D

what is academic vocabulary
What is Academic Vocabulary?

determine, decide, resolve, conclude, establish, find out

significant, important, underlying, core, major, primary

conclude, infer, imply, interpret, assume, deduce, construe

vocabulary knowledge rating discussion questions
Vocabulary Knowledge RatingDiscussion Questions*

Important academic vocabulary used as part of the instruction!!!

Questions to Prompt Partner Interactions:

  • Do you know what __ means?
  • Are you familiar with the word __?

Questions to Prompt Group Interactions:

  • Who knows what __ means?
  • Who is familiar with the word __?

*Used with permission of Kate Kinsella, Ed.D

teaching academic vocabulary
Teaching Academic Vocabulary

Kate Kinsella, Ed.D

San Francisco State University, Center for Teacher Efficacy

katek@sfsu.edu 707.473.9030

*Videos and other materials used with permission of Kate Kinsella, Ed.D

why preteach vocabulary
Why Preteach Vocabulary?

By the time the children were 3 years old, parents in less economically favored circumstances had said fewer different words in their cumulative monthly vocabularies than the children in the most economically advantaged families in the same period of time.

Hart, B., & Risley, R. T. (1995). Meaningful differences in the everyday experience of young American children. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

why preteach vocabulary12
Why Preteach Vocabulary

Hart, B., & Risley, R. T. (1995). Meaningful differences in the everyday experience of young American children. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

beginning with structured writing
Beginning with Structured Writing
  • First, work out sentence(s) aloud with the student.
  • Next, write out sentence(s) for the student.
  • Finally, have student copy sentence(s)[using a word processor].
moving from speaking to writing
Moving from Speaking to Writing

Vocabulary Notebook, Example 1

Vocabulary Notebook, Example 2

Vocabulary Notebook, Example 3

scaffold the writing tasks
Scaffold the Writing Tasks
  • Graphic organizers
  • Picture writing
  • Framed paragraphs
  • Models
  • Formula writing
focus on interests
Focus on Interests

Let me tell you about Sam.

teach writing tricks
Teach Writing “Tricks”
  • How to beat the writing test
  • Analyzing prompts
  • Planning ahead
write not right
WRITE, not right
  • ALWAYS separate drafting and revising from editing.
  • Use the multiple draft approach.
practice strategies to increase fluency decrease fatigue
Practice Strategies to Increase Fluency & Decrease Fatigue
  • Fluency drills
  • All pens are not equal
  • Eliminating the internal editor
  • Automaticity
overcome obstacles barriers
Overcome Obstacles/Barriers

Let me tell you about Kate.

slide24

Utilize consistent strategies, processes, and organizers across the curriculum and throughout the school.

don t give up or give in
Don’t Give Up or Give In
  • Be persistent (firm but gentle)
  • Begin with what’s doable
  • Develop writing routines
contact information
Contact Information

Cynde Snider, PhD, NBCT

Division for Special Education Services and Supports

Georgia Department of Education

csnider@doe.k12.ga.us

404-657-9971