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ITT Course – Unit 2. Chapter 2 Windows Family. Learning Objectives. To know about basics of windows To discuss about icons, desktop, taskbar, start button, my computer, recycle bin To understand the concept of control panel. Windows Desktop.

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ITT Course – Unit 2


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  1. ITT Course – Unit 2 Chapter 2 Windows Family

  2. Learning Objectives • To know about basics of windows • To discuss about icons, desktop, taskbar, start button, my computer, recycle bin • To understand the concept of control panel

  3. Windows Desktop • The desktop is the main screen area that the user see after you turn on their computer and log on to Windows. • When the user opens programs or folders, they appear on the desktop. • The user can also put things on the desktop, such as files and folders, and arrange them as per choice.

  4. Desktop Components The desktop is sometimes defined more broadly to include the taskbar & Windows Sidebar.

  5. Desktop - Icons • Icons are small pictures that represent files, folders, programs, and other items. • When user first start Windows, they will see at least one icon on the desktop: • the Recycle Bin • Some examples of desktop icons are as follows:- • Double-clicking a desktop icon starts or opens the item it represents. For example, double-clicking the Internet Explorer icon starts Internet Explorer.

  6. Icons – Adding & Removing • The user can choose which icons appear on the desktop. The user can add or remove an icon at any time. • If the user wants to have an easy access from the desktop to your favorite files or programs, they, create shortcuts for them. • A shortcut is an icon that represents a link to an item, rather than the item itself. • When the user double-click a shortcut, the item opens. If the user deletes a shortcut, only the shortcut is removed, and not the original item. • The user can identify shortcuts by the arrow on their icon.

  7. Activities with Desktop Icons • To add a shortcut to the desktop • Locate the item that the user want to create a shortcut for. • Right-click the item, click Send To, and then click Desktop (create shortcut). The shortcut icon appears on the desktop. • To add or remove common desktop icons • Common desktop icons include Computer, user’s personal folder, Network, the Recycle Bin, Internet Explorer, and Control Panel. • Right-click an empty area of the desktop, and then click Personalize. • In the left pane, click Change desktop icons. • Under Desktop icons, select the check box for each icon that the user wants to add to the desktop, or clear the check box for each icon that the user wants to remove from the desktop, and then click OK. • To move a file from a folder to the desktop • Open the folder that contains the file. • Drag the file to the desktop. • To remove an icon from the desktop • Right-click the icon, and then click Delete. If the icon is a shortcut, only the shortcut is removed; the original item is not deleted.

  8. Personalize Right Click on Desktop  Personalize.

  9. Windows Color & Appearance • It fine tunes the color and style of your windows.

  10. Desktop Background • User can choose from available backgrounds or colors or use their own pictures for the said purpose.

  11. Screen Saver • A screen saver is a picture or animation that covers the desktop screen when the computer is idle for a set period of time.

  12. Sound • Apply a sound effect for various windows activities.

  13. Themes • Themes can change a wide variety of visual and auditory elements at one time including the appearance of menus, icons, backgrounds, screen savers, some computer sounds, and mouse pointer.

  14. Display Settings • This options lets the user adjust the monitor resolution, which changes the view so more or fewer items fit on the screen.

  15. Taskbar • The taskbar is the long horizontal bar at the bottom of the screen. Unlike the desktop, which can get obscured by the windows on top of it, the taskbar is visible almost all the time.

  16. Sections of Taskbar

  17. The Start Menu • The Start menu is the main gateway to your computer's programs, folders, and settings. • It is called a menu because it provides a list of choices, just as a restaurant menu does. Start Button

  18. The Start Menu Activities • The Start menu can be used to do the common activities as follows:- • Start programs • Open commonly used folders • Search for files, folders, and programs • Adjust computer settings • Get help with the Windows operating system • Turn off the computer • Log off from Windows or switch to a different user account

  19. Getting Started - Start Menu To open the Start menu, click the Start button     in the lower-left corner of the screen. Or, press the Windows logo key     on the keyboard. The Start menu appears as follows:- • The Start menu is divided into three basic parts: • The large left pane shows a short list of programs on the computer. The computer manufacturer can customize this list, so its exact appearance will vary. Clicking All Programs displays a complete list of programs. • In the lower left corner is the search box, which allows the user to look for programs and files on the computer by typing in search terms. • The right pane provides access to commonly used folders, files, settings, and features. It's also where the user go to log off from Windows or turn off the computer.

  20. Start Menu-Opening Programs • One of the most common uses of the Start menu is opening programs installed on your computer. To open a program shown in the left pane of the Start menu, click it. The program opens and the Start menu closes. • If you don't see the program the user wants to open, click All Programs at the bottom of the left pane. Instantly, the left pane displays a long list of programs in alphabetical order, followed by a list of folders.

  21. Start Menu-Opening Programs • Clicking one of the program icons launches the program, and the Start menu closes. So what's inside the folders? More programs. Click Accessories, for example, and a list of programs that are stored in that folder appears. Click any program to open it. To get back to the programs the user saw when they first opened the Start menu, click Back near the bottom of the menu.

  22. Start Menu-Opening Programs • If the user are unsure about what a program does, move the pointer over its icon or name. A box appears that often contains a description of the program. For example, pointing to Calculator displays this message: "Performs basic arithmetic tasks with an on-screen calculator." This trick works for items in the right pane of the Start menu, too. • The user might notice that over time, the lists of programs in your Start menu change. This happens for two reasons. First, when the user install new programs, they get added to the All Programs list. Second, the Start menu detects which programs the user use the most, and it places them in the left pane for quick access.

  23. Start Menu- Search Box • The Search box is one of the most convenient ways to find things on the computer. The exact location of the items doesn't matter—the Search box will scour the programs and all of the folders in the personal folder (which includes Documents, Pictures, Music, Desktop, and other common locations). It will also search e‑mail messages, saved instant messages, appointments, and contacts. • To use the Search box, open the Start menu and start typing. As the user type, the search results appear above the Search box in the left pane of the Start menu. • A program, file, or folder will appear as a search result if: • Any word in its title matches or begins with the search term. • Any text in the actual contents of the file—such as the text in a word- processing document—matches or begins with the search term. • Any word in a property of the file, such as the author, matches or begins with the search term. • Click any search result to open it.

  24. Start Menu- Right Pane • The right pane of the Start menu contains the following: • Personal folder: Opens the personal folder, which is named for whoever is currently logged on to Windows. • Documents: Opens the Documents folder, where user can store and open text files, spreadsheets, presentations, and other kinds of documents. • Pictures: Opens the Pictures folder, where user can store / view digital pictures & graphics files. • Music: Opens the Music folder, where user can store & play music & other audio files. • Games: Opens the Games folder, where user can access all of the stored games. • Search: Opens a window where user can search the computer with advanced options. • Recent Items: Opens a list of files user have opened recently. • Computer: Opens a window where user can access disk drives, cameras, printers, scanners, and other hardware connected to the computer. • Network: Opens a window where user can access the network computers & devices. • Connect To: Opens a window where user can connect to a new network. • Control Panel: Opens Control Panel, where user can customize the appearance & functionality of computer, add or remove programs, set up network connections, & manage user accounts. • Default Programs: Opens a window where user can choose which program the user you want Windows to use for activities like web browsing, editing pictures, etc. • Help and Support: Opens Windows Help and Support, where user can browse & search Help topics about using Windows and the computer.

  25. Start Menu- Right Pane • At the bottom of the right pane are two buttons: the Power button and the Lock button. Click the Power button to turn off the computer, or click the Lock button to lock the computer without turning it off. Once locked, the computer cannot be used until the user unlock it with their password. • Clicking the arrow next to the lock button displays a menu with additional options for switching users, logging off, restarting, or shutting down. Lock Button Shutdown Button

  26. Start Menu- Logging Off • Log off from Windows • When the user log off from Windows, all of the programs they were using closes, but the computer is not turned off. • Click the Start button, point to the arrow next to the Lock button, and then click Log Off. • Notes • After the user log off, another user can log on without needing to restart the computer. In addition, the user don't need to worry about losing their information if they turn off the computer. • When the user are done using Windows, they don't have to log off. The user can choose to lock the computer or to allow someone else to log on to the computer by using Fast User Switching. If user lock the computer, only the user or an administrator can unlock it. Fast User Switching is not included in Windows Vista Starter.

  27. Start Menu- Shutdown Shut down is used when the user must turn off the power of the computer.

  28. Start Menu- Sleep • It is an alternative to shut down process. • Windows provides a power-saving state called sleep. Like hibernation, sleep saves all of the work to the hard disk, including information about the programs the user were using, such as window location and size. After saving the work, sleep puts the user’s computer in a power-saving state.

  29. Start Menu - Views Classical View Default View

  30. Customizing Start Menu

  31. Customizing Start Menu • To pin a program icon to the Start menu • If the user uses a program regularly, they can create a shortcut to it by pinning the program icon to the Start menu. Pinned program icons appear on the left side of the Start menu, above the horizontal line. • Right-click the program icon that the user wants to pin to the Start menu, and then click Pin to Start Menu. • Notes • To unpin a program icon, right-click it, and then click Unpin from Start Menu. • To change the order of a pinned item, drag the program icon to a new position in the list.

  32. Customizing Start Menu • To remove a program icon from the Start menu • Removing a program icon from the Start menu doesn't remove it from the All Programs list or uninstall the program. • Click the Start button . • Right-click the program icon the user want to remove from the Start menu, and then click Remove from this list. • To move the Start button • The Start button is located on the taskbar. Although the user can't remove the Start button from the taskbar, the user can move the taskbar—and the Start button along with it. • Right-click an empty space on the taskbar. If Lock the Taskbar has a check mark beside it, click it to remove the check mark. • Click an empty space on the taskbar, and then hold down the mouse button as the user drag the taskbar to one of the four edges of the desktop. When the taskbar is where the user wants it to be, release the mouse button. • Note • To lock the taskbar into place, right-click an empty space on the taskbar, and then click Lock the Taskbar so that the check mark reappears.

  33. Customizing Start Menu • To clear recent items from the Start menu • Clearing the Recent Items list does not delete the items from the computer. • Click the Start button . • Right-click Recent Items, and then click Clear Recent Items List. • To adjust the number of shortcuts for frequently used programs • Click to open Taskbar and Start Menu Properties. • Click the Start Menu tab, and then click Customize. • In the Customize Start Menu dialog box, in the Number of recent programs to display box, enter the number of programs the user wants to display on the Start menu, and then click OK. • To customize the right pane of the Start menu • The user can add or remove items, such as Computer, Control Panel, and Pictures, that appear on the right side of the Start menu. The user can also change some items so that they appear as links or menus. • Click to open Taskbar and Start Menu Properties. • Click the Start Menu tab, and then click Customize. • In the Customize Start Menu dialog box, select the options in the list that the user want, and then click OK.

  34. Customizing Start Menu • To restore Start menu default settings • The user can restore the Start menu to its original, default settings. • Click to open Taskbar and Start Menu Properties. • Click the Start Menu tab, and then click Customize. • In the Customize Start Menu dialog box, click Use Default Settings, and then click OK. • To search for programs from the Start menu • Click the Start button and then type a word or phrase in the Search box. • To add the Run command to the Start menu • Click to open Taskbar and Start Menu Properties. • Click the Start Menu tab, and then click Customize. • In the Customize Start Menu dialog box, scroll through the list of options to find the Run command check box, select it, and then click OK.

  35. The Quick Launch Toolbar • To the immediate right of the Start button is the Quick Launch toolbar. As its name implies, it lets you launch (start) programs with a single click. For example, click the Internet Explorer icon to start Internet Explorer. • The user can customize the Quick Launch toolbar by adding their favorite programs to it. Locate the program in the Start menu, right- click it, and then click Add to Quick Launch. The program's icon now appears in the toolbar. To remove an icon from the Quick Launch toolbar, right-click it, click Delete, and then click Yes.

  36. The Notification Area • The notification area, on the far right side of the taskbar, includes a clock and a group of icons. It looks like this: • These icons communicate the status of something on the computer or provide access to certain settings. The set of icons the user see depends on which programs or services they have installed and how they computer manufacturer set up their computer. • Double-clicking an icon in the notification area usually opens the program or setting associated with it. For example, double-clicking the volume icon opens the volume controls. Double-clicking the network icon opens Network and Sharing Center. • Occasionally, an icon in the notification area will display a small pop-up window (called a notification) to notify the user about something.

  37. Windows Slidebar & Gadgets • Windows Sidebar is a long, vertical bar that is displayed on the side of the desktop. • It contains mini-programs called gadgets, which offer information at a glance and provide easy access to frequently used tools. • For example, the user can use gadgets to display a picture slide show, view continuously updated headlines, or look up contacts.

  38. Customizing Taskbar • To modify the Taskbar – right Click on the Taskbar and choose Properties

  39. Customizing Taskbar • To hide the taskbar • Click to open Taskbar and Start Menu Properties. • On the Taskbar tab, select Auto-hide the taskbar, and then click OK. The taskbar is hidden from view but reappears when you point to it. • To show the taskbar • Click to open Taskbar and Start Menu Properties. • On the Taskbar tab, clear the Auto-hide the taskbar check box, and then click OK. • To lock or unlock the taskbar • Right-click an empty space on the taskbar, and then click Lock the Taskbar so that it has a check mark next to it. • To unlock the taskbar, click Lock the Taskbar to clear the check mark. • To move the taskbar • Right-click an empty space on the taskbar. • If Lock the Taskbar has a check mark next to it, the taskbar is locked. Unlock it by clicking Lock the Taskbar, which removes the check mark. • Click an empty space on the taskbar, and then hold down the mouse button as the user drags the taskbar to the top, bottom, or side of the desktop. • When the taskbar is where the user want it to be, release the mouse button.

  40. Customizing Taskbar • To resize the taskbar • Right-click an empty space on the taskbar. If Lock the Taskbar has a check mark next to it, the taskbar is locked. Unlock it by clicking Lock the Taskbar, which removes the check mark. • Point to the edge of the taskbar until the pointer changes into a double-headed arrow, and then drag the border up or down. • To stop grouping similar taskbar buttons on the taskbar • Click to open Taskbar and Start Menu Properties. • If the Group similar taskbar buttons check box is selected, the buttons will automatically stack on top of each other. To turn off grouping, clear the Group similar taskbar buttons check box. • To show or hide icons in the notification area • Click the arrow next to the notification area to show more or hide more icons the notification area.

  41. Customizing Taskbar • To add a toolbar to the taskbar • A toolbar is a row, column, or block of buttons or icons representing tasks the user can do within a program. Some toolbars, such as the Quick Launch toolbar, can appear on the taskbar. • Right-click an empty area on the taskbar and point to Toolbars. • Items with check marks beside them are already on the taskbar. Click any item in the list to add or remove it. • To add or remove the Quick Launch toolbar • The Quick Launch toolbar contains shortcuts to frequently used programs. • Right-click an empty area on the taskbar and point to Toolbars. To add the Quick Launch toolbar to the taskbar, click Quick Launch. A check mark should appear. To remove the Quick Launch toolbar, click the check mark.

  42. Customizing Taskbar • To show or hide icons in the Quick Launch toolbar • Right-click an empty space on the taskbar. If Lock the Taskbar has a check mark next to it, the taskbar is locked. Unlock it by clicking Lock the Taskbar, which removes the check mark. • Point to the Quick Launch toolbar. • Click the toolbar sizing handle, and then drag it to show or hide the Quick Launch toolbar. If the user you don't see the toolbar sizing handle, there's probably not enough room on the taskbar to expand it further. • To add a program to the Quick Launch toolbar • Locate the program the user want to add on the Start menu or on the desktop. • Click the program icon, and then drag it to the Quick Launch toolbar. • To remove a program from the Quick Launch toolbar • On the Quick Launch toolbar, right-click the program icon, and then click Delete.

  43. Versions of Taskbar The taskbar in Windows 7 allows large task icons and pinning icons to the taskbar, and hides titles when set to always combine. A standard Windows Vista (with Aero) taskbar with two tasks running. A standard Windows XP taskbar with two tasks running. The original implementation of the Windows taskbar in Windows 95, with one task running.

  44. Application Window

  45. Document Window

  46. Minimize Button Maximize Button Close Button Window Buttons

  47. Dialog Box • A Dialog box looks like a window but it is different in that a window is to display information and a Dialog Box is to gather information. • The Parts of the Dialog Box:- • 1. The Title Bar • 2. Tabs • 3. A Drop Down List Box • 4. Option Buttons • 5. A Text Box • 6. Command Buttons • 7. A Spinner • 8. A Slider

  48. Using Menu • Most programs contain dozens or even hundreds of commands (actions) that are organized under menus. • Like a restaurant menu, a program menu shows the user a list of choices. • To keep the screen uncluttered, menus are hidden until the user click their titles in the menu bar, located just underneath the title bar. • For example, clicking "Image" in Paint's menu bar displays the Image menu:

  49. Using Menu • To choose one of the commands listed in a menu, click it. Sometimes a dialog box appears, in which the user can select further options. If a command is unavailable and cannot be clicked, it is shown in gray, like the Crop command in the picture. • Some menu items are not commands at all. Instead, they open other menus. In the following picture, pointing to "Zoom" opens a submenu. Pointing to "Custom" in the submenu would open yet another submenu.

  50. Using Menu • If the user don't see the command they want, try looking at another menu. Move the mouse pointer along the menu bar and its menus open automatically; the user don't need to click the menu bar again. To close a menu without selecting any commands, click the menu bar or any other part of the window. • Recognizing menus isn't always easy, because not all menu controls look alike or even appear on a menu bar. So how can the user spot them? When the user see an arrow next to a word or picture, they are probably looking at a menu control. Here are some examples as follows:-