Early Multi-level Supports for Implementing Early Mathematics Interventions: Successful and Unsuccessful Strategies - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Early Multi-level Supports for Implementing Early Mathematics Interventions: Successful and Unsuccessful Strategies

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  1. Early Multi-level Supports for Implementing Early Mathematics Interventions: Successful and Unsuccessful Strategies Douglas H. Clements, Julie Sarama, & Christopher Wolfe

  2. National Math Panel Children from low-income backgrounds enter school with far less knowledge… gap…progressively widens throughout their PreK-12 years”

  3. National Math Panel “Research that scales up early interventions capable of strengthening mathematical knowledge, evaluating their utility in Pre-K and K, and examining long term effects is urgently needed, with a particular focus on at-risk learners”

  4. TRIAD means…

  5. TRIAD Instruction

  6. Curriculum Research Framework • Clements, D. H. (2007). Curriculum research: Toward a framework for ‘research-based curricula’. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 38, 35–70.

  7. Clements, D. H. (2007). Curriculum research: Toward a framework for ‘research-based curricula’. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 38, 35–70

  8. Curriculum Research Framework • A Priori Foundation • General: Broad philosophies, theories, and empirical results • Subject Matter • substantive contribution, build from past, generative • Pedagogical (e.g., computer activities) • Consider phase 10—scale-up, as a related but distinct area to consider Clements, D. H. (2007). Curriculum research: Toward a framework for ‘research-based curricula’. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 38, 35–70.

  9. Learning Trajectories • Learning trajectories core of our Curriculum Research Framework • Core construct on which to base building, formatively evaluating, implementing, and summatively evaluating a curriculum

  10. Curriculum Research Framework • Market Research • Bane of research, unless it fits into CRF and is scientific • Teachers have to make sense of it—not “teacher proof” but communication lack. • Week organization: Whole, small, centers • Involved teachers in every phase (e.g., names of LT levels— “OK, that does make sense”)

  11. Curriculum Research Framework • Formative Evaluation • Small Group • Learning trajectory’s elements evaluated • Single Classroom • Meaning teachers and students give in progressively expanding social contexts • Intended and unintended outcomes; emergent in complex system • Multiple Classrooms • Diverse group of teachers • Support required

  12. Curriculum Research Framework • Summative • Small Scale • 4-10 classrooms • Large Scale • Scale up, studying moderators and mediators for explanatory power (contextual, implementation variables) • Fidelity of implementation and sustainability on a large scale (of effects and implementation) • Diffusion theory; overlapping spheres of influence models

  13. TRIAD (Professional) Development

  14. Teachers’ Representations of Learning Trajectories:Developed Simultaneously with BB

  15. TRIAD II:Large-Scale Evaluation

  16. TRIAD ES = 0.76 Control Rasch scores p < .0001

  17. Follow Through

  18. TRIAD Follow Through TRIAD Control TRIAD groups > Control, ES = .34 TRIAD FT > others, ES = .27

  19. Lessons Learned:Diverse Program Schedules Build flexibility into schedules: • half day programs, • 4 day per week programs • early schools, late schools • Other time constraints Help teachers to recognize and work with this flexibility.

  20. Lessons Learned:Difficulty of PD Material • Recognize that teachers, by self-report, have limited math content knowledge (although they report that this limited knowledge is adequate). • Recognize that teachers will find the LTs difficult at first (hate me in Nov. and Dec.); later, the LTs will make much more sense, and become a useful tool for the teachers (love me in Jan. and Feb.).

  21. Lessons Learned:Technological Problems • Recognize that some teachers have limited technological experience. • Provide a technical mentor • Use the “teach a person to fish” rather than the “give the person a fish” approach.

  22. Palatability by Design • Increased attention to this construct may lead to • more specific definition • deliberate inclusion at the design stage • development of specific measures of palatability, based on current scale-up efforts and experiences • Such work could contribute to the theoretical underpinnings of scale-up

  23. Web Sites (and article download) UBTRIAD.org UBBuildingBlocks.org