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  1. First-Future Webs E

  2. Part 3: Future Webs

  3. Initial Consequences

  4. Initial Consequences. 1We need to go beyond Warburg’s vision of Survival of the the Classics (Nachleben der Antike) to include the roots of these ideas (Vorleben de Antike).

  5. Initial Consequences. 2We need new systems that integrate knowledge at different levels and different scales of reality.

  6. Initial Consequences. 3Links to dictionaries in our own language are not enough. We need collaborative efforts on comparative etymological dictionaries.

  7. Initial Consequences. 4These links need to go to levels below full words to include the meanings of individual phonemes.

  8. Initial Consequences. 5The important links in culture are not just with single words but across different levels of reality.

  9. Initial Consequences. 6When we enter such levels of complexity, then Who? and What? Questions need to complemented with Where?, When?, How? And Why?

  10. The WWW is focussing on the logic and truth of born-digital links.This is important.

  11. Initial Consequences. 7A Semantic Web of the futureneeds to grow into aWide Worlds Web.

  12. In the past we made comments in the text: Justinianus, Digestum vetus (with the Glossa ordinaria of Accursius).Venice : Johannes and Gregorius de Gregoriis, de Forlivio and Jacobus Britannicus, 15 Dec. 1484. Folio. 349 leaves.427x285 mm. Bound in contemporary blind-stamped brown calf over wooden boards, with two metal clasps and coner and center metals.Prov.: Georg Altdorfer; Monastery of S. Mang, Fuessen. http://www.wul.waseda.ac.jp/TENJI/virtual/incunabla/incu02.html

  13. Source Footnotes pointed to things outside the text often requiring great effort to find the source in question. http://www.med.yale.edu/library/historical/Mandrake/mandrake1.htm

  14. With electronic hotlinks we can go directly back to the source. http://www.med.yale.edu/library/historical/Mandrake/mandrake1.htm http://www.polirom.ro/titluri.cgi?action=titluri&class=details&id=1549 http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0674993896?v=glance

  15. With electronic hotlinks we can check other editions. http://www.med.yale.edu/library/historical/Mandrake/mandrake1.htm http://www.polirom.ro/titluri.cgi?action=titluri&class=details&id=1549 http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0674993896?v=glance

  16. With polyfunctional omnilinks we can go to historical editions. http://www.med.yale.edu/library/historical/Mandrake/mandrake1.htm http://library.ulster.ac.uk/craine/davis7.gif

  17. With polyfunctional omnilinks we can go to historical manuscripts. http://www.med.yale.edu/library/historical/Mandrake/mandrake1.htm http://www.ibiblio.org/expo/vatican.exhibit/exhibit/g-nature/images/nature02.jpg

  18. Polyfunctional omnilinks canlink with other works on Historia Naturalis http://www.med.yale.edu/library/historical/Mandrake/mandrake1.htm http://twinsite2000.tripod.com/timeline/xviib.htm

  19. Desideratum 1 The principle of hotlinks can be extended to omnilinks whereby every word can be a multilayered set of connections.

  20. Desideratum 1 These omnilinks can take us to multiple sources.They can also take us via existing classing and ordering systems to arrive at multiple sources more systematically.

  21. Desideratum 2 This implies that URLs (URIs and URNs) alone are not enough for a web of trust. We need links back to the original object –or its official digital version by the owner. So a link to Mona Lisa in the Louvre is distinguished from the many Mona links.

  22. Desideratum 3 Professional cameras already record time and spatial co-ordinates of a picture. This needs to be incorporated into capture technology generally and become part of our web metadata.

  23. The US Military and Microsoft are working on a complete 3D scale model of the physical world. We are already tagging products and animals with Digital Object Identifiers (DOIS). If these are co-ordinated, then taking a snapshot can link us to knowledge bases about objects.

  24. In the past we used libraries to learn about the world. If we tag the virtual version of the world and link it with both our knowledge bases and the original then cameras which were passive can become active and we can use the physical world as a point of entry into libraries.

  25. Desideratum 4 Cross-Referencing our digital earth with knowledge bases means that our physical earth can effectively become a search engine when we focus a camera or sensor on some detail.

  26. Today search engines search for URLs, (URNs or URIs).Systems such as Google tell us nothing about the level of reality of the findings.

  27. A search for Mona Lisa gives us:1. Image of Original in Louvre2. Many copies of Image 3. Many versions of Image4. Many texts about Mona Lisa 5. Many objects adapting Mona Lisa.

  28. Who What Where When How Why Metaphysical Mental Natural Man-Made Social It is possible to distinguish five basic levels of reality.

  29. Who What Where When How Why Religion Philosophy 7 Liberal Arts Dialectic(Logic) Grammar Arithmetic Geometry Medicine Music Astronomy Architecture Law Geography Chronicle History Rhetoric Metaphysical Mental Natural Man-Made Social This principle can be applied to traditional disciplines.

  30. Who What Where When How Why Religion Philosophy 7 Liberal Arts Dialectic(Logic) Grammar Arithmetic Geometry Medicine Music Astronomy Architecture Law Geography Chronicle History Rhetoric Metaphysical Mental Natural Man-Made Social The semantic web has focussed thus far on Logic (in Black Box).

  31. Who What Where When How Why Liberal Arts Medicine Nat. Sciences Environment Tourism Architecture Engineering Social Science Entertainment Geography Chronicle History Politics Psychiatry Religion Philosophy Psychology Metaphysical Mental Natural Man-Made Social The same principle applied to basic disciplines of knowledge.

  32. Who What Where When How Why Medicine Anatomy Public Health Medical Law Medical Sociology History of Medicine Quality Assurance in Medicine Physiology Nursing Ethics in Medicine Psychiatry Psychology Metaphysical Mental Natural Man-Made Social Appendix 4. The same principle applied to branches of medicine. The same principle applied to branches of medicine.

  33. Desideratum 5We can use the ordered knowledge of traditional disciplines to distinguish between different levels of reality of our searches. We can then search specifically for literary references to Mona Lisa.

  34. Today search engines search with no idea of why we are searching. If our goal is leisure then a search for Florence should lead to different information than if our goal is research.

  35. Who What Where When How Why Religion Education Everyday Health Environment Business Law Government Leisure Metaphysical Mental Natural Man-Made Social The principle of different worlds applied to basic goals of searching.

  36. Desideratum 6We can also use levels of reality to help distinguish different goals in searching for information and knowledge.

  37. One of the seminal problems of searching is that we do not have the technical vocabulary (authority files) to find it in various systems.

  38. We can use the specialized vocabularies of classification systems and thesauri to provide users with the vocabulary to find what they want. In short, even before we do searching we give users the words they require to search with proper terms.

  39. This applies equally to the categories we need to begin a search. Hence, if our goal is education and our subject is religion, the system gives a series of prompts.

  40. Who What Where When How Why Popes Cardinals Archbishops Bishops Priests Nuns Monks Lay Brothers Saints Religion Metaphysical Mental Natural Man-Made Social Cathedral Basilica Church Monastery Sacraments Festivals Feasts Novenas Vigils Appendix 4. The same principle applied to branches of medicine. The same principle applied to branches of religion.

  41. Desideratum 7The specialized vocabularies of classification systems and thesauri can provide users with controlled vocabulary to find what they want.

  42. Today there is a great emphasis on ontologies as new systems to replace existing ones. This is valuable.

  43. Desideratum 8We also need to use multilingual, historical classifications, and thesauri to give us access methods into the knowledge systems of other places and times.

  44. Thus far the web has focussed on verbal searches. Exceptions have been experiments such as QBIC, Excalibur.

  45. Here alphabets and historical versions can provide us with technical concepts for searching.

  46. Here product catalogues, visual dictionaries and historical versions can be extremely valuable in providing us with technical vocabularies for searching.

  47. Desideratum 9We can extend the concept of omnilinks to include visual images from alphabets and visual dictionaries and use these as an aid to navigation.

  48. There are great potentials in further distinguishing scales of reality and using images as orientation tools.

  49. Cosmic Scale: Map of Heavens as an entry point.

  50. Cosmic Scale: World trees as entry points into different cultural systems