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2011-12 CITYWIDE INSTRUCTIONAL EXPECTATIONS EXCELLENT STUDENT WORK THROUGH HIGHLY EFFECTIVE TEACHING. Principal Feedback Session May 2011. INSTRUCTIONAL EXPECTATIONS 2011-12 Principal Feedback Session. A NEW TRAJECTORY FOR COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS FOR ALL STUDENTS.

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slide1

2011-12 CITYWIDE INSTRUCTIONAL EXPECTATIONS

EXCELLENT STUDENT WORK THROUGH

HIGHLY EFFECTIVE TEACHING

Principal Feedback Session

May 2011

slide2

INSTRUCTIONAL EXPECTATIONS 2011-12

Principal Feedback Session

a new trajectory for college and career readiness for all students
A NEW TRAJECTORY FOR COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS FOR ALL STUDENTS
  • Today’s students live and will work in a different world
  • Students need to know how to think critically and apply their knowledge to solve non-routine problems
  • The Common Core standards outline a new definition and trajectory of college and career readiness that reflect the demands of the 21st century
  • The Common Core standards provide an opportunity to raise the bar and help us prepare our students to be more globally competitive
slide4

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?

  • Students
      • Engage in rigorous work aligned with new standards
  • Teachers
      • Work in teams to review student work and align curriculum & teacher practice with the Common Core
      • Create entry points into the curriculum for all students
  • School Leaders
      • Provide teachers with meaningful feedback tied to a clear standard of excellence
  • Networks
      • Provide ongoing support to school-based educators

4

slide5

STRENGTHENING STUDENT WORK ~ EXPECTATIONS

Fall 2011

Winter / Spring 2011-12

  • Schools analyze student work samples in relation to selected Common Core standards through existing teacher teams engaged in collaborative inquiry
  • As a result, schools understand the current state of teacher and student work and determine how to strengthen teacher and student work in relation to the Common Core
  • Schools engage all students in working toward college and career readiness by giving them the opportunity to try at least one literacy culminating task and one math culminating task
  • Tasks embedded in curricula aligned to the Common Core
  • Curricula are made accessible to ALL students through the use of Universal Design for Learning

5

winter spring 2011 12 literacy and math
Winter/Spring 2011-12 ~ Literacy and MATH

Expectations

  • Every student engages in a rigorous, Common Core-aligned literacy and math task embedded within a well-sequenced curricular unit. Specific expectation varies based on grade level, but generally, students will:
    • Read and analyze informational texts and write opinions and arguments in response to these texts.
    • Use modeling (Mathematical Practice #4) to solve a cognitively demanding math task in a given domain of focus at each grade level.
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STRENGTHENING TEACHER PRACTICE ~ EXPECTATIONS

2011-12

  • When teachers thrive, students thrive. In support of teachers’ efforts to integrate the Common Core into their planning and instruction, principals and school leaders will
    • Set clear, research-based expectations for pedagogy articulated in a rubric of practice (e.g., Danielson)
    • Engage in short, frequent cycles of classroom observations & collaborative examination of student work, followed by timely, specific, evidence-based feedback that teachers can act on to increase the effectiveness of their instruction
  • As a result, teachers have a deeper understanding of what they are trying to achieve with students, engage in ongoing reflection of their practice, and receive support to continually develop their effectiveness to increase students’ college and career readiness

7

teacher evaluation system multiple measures
Teacher Evaluation System ~ MULTIPLE MEASURES

Multiple Measures of Teacher Effectiveness

Measures of

Teacher Competencies

(60%)

Local Measures of

Student Learning

(20%)

State Measures of Student Learning

(20%)

  • Assessments that provide instructionally useful information about student progress on key skills, potentially including:
  • Performance tasks
  • Teacher/department- created assessments
  • Computer adaptive assessments
  • Group measures

Teacher growth measures in grades 4-8 ELA & Math

Teacher growth measures in additional grades & subjects with existing state tests

Professional skills, behavior, and knowledge that have the greatest impact on student learning

Observations, walkthroughs, reviews of lesson and unit plans, teacher reflection

Potentially includes student feedback

implementation timeline
IMPLEMENTATION TIMELINE
  • NYS adopts Common Core standards in literacy and math
  • NYS wins $170M RTTT assessment grant through PARCC consortium

New York State

Design of Common Core-aligned summative and formative assessments

PARCC summative assessments operational

  • PARCC assessments available for pilot use
  • NYS integrates Common Core into State tests

New teacher evaluation system operational statewide*

  • NYS adopts EdLaw 3012-c
  • 3012-c begins to phase in

New York City

Ongoing capacity-building for clusters, networks and schools

  • Common Core Library launches for resource sharing

Common Core & Teacher Effectiveness Pilots

125 schools

Talent Management Pilot

5 networks

Periodic Assessment portfolio integrates principles of PARCC

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resources to support implementation
RESOURCES TO SUPPORT IMPLEMENTATION
  • Central will provide schools with
    • Sample Common Core-aligned tasks and units, with student work exemplars, and guidance for development including points of entry for SWDs and ELLs
    • Protocols for reviewing student work in teams
    • Case studies illustrating what strengthening teacher and student work looks like in action
    • Videos of exemplary teaching practice
    • Templates, samples, protocols for giving effective feedback
    • Financial supports for implementation
  • Networks and clusters will provide schools with
    • Structured professional learning opportunities to build capacity within each school to strengthen the instructional core
    • Structured professional learning opportunities to understand and apply Charlotte Danielson’s Framework for Teaching
    • Ongoing push-in support to practice and refine the implementation of these processes
    • Additional network instructional support staff to work with school leaders
time as a resource
TIME AS A RESOURCE
  • In a climate of budget challenges and/or contract parameters, one of our greatest assets is time. Schools can
    • Create an innovative school schedule* that allows teacher teams to meet regularly during the school day to
      • Share/plan curriculum
      • Review student work
      • Engage in professional development conversations
    • Structure Circular 6 activities to provide teacher teams with additional time for professional collaboration*
    • Use the SBO process to allow for longer extended time sessions (i.e. 50 minutes versus 37.5 minutes)
    • Use the SBO process to allow use of one extended time session a week for collaborative inquiry meetings

*This may require an SBO.

collaborative inquiry as a process to strengthen student work and teacher practice
COLLABORATIVE INQUIRY AS A PROCESS TO STRENGTHEN STUDENT WORK AND TEACHER PRACTICE

Examine

teacher work

(including

classroom

visits)

Examine

student

work/

data

Revise and

repeat inquiry

cycle

Define gaps,

instructional

strategy and

set goals

Monitor student progress

with common assessments

Engage

external

resources

Take action:

implement

instructional

strategy

  • Teachers and Teacher Teams:
  • Look at student work, curriculum and assessments.
  • Assess gaps and strengths represented in that work
  • Reflect, learn and plan how to strengthen their practice to help students better meet the standards (curriculum, assessment, and pedagogy)

Extending collaborative inquiry to include a focus on Instruction for all learners

  • Principals and School Administrators:
  • Look at student work, curriculum, assessments in the context of teacher practice
  • Regularly visit classrooms
  • Provide timely, specific, evidence-based feedback for teachers to assist teachers in improving their practice

Network teams help coach school leaders to facilitate this process.

12

slide14

As a result of these efforts, by JUNE 2012, we will have…

  • 1.1 million students engaging in rigorous, Common Core-aligned, curriculum-embedded tasks
  • Nearly 50,000 of our teachers implementing these new tasks in classrooms
  • 10,000+ educators trained and either leading or ready to lead instructional change at the school level
  • 1,700 principals ready to support and hold their teachers accountable towards a higher standard for student work
  • A significant portion of our Race to the Top dollars deployed strategically to support the vision
  • A city organized and engaged around the pursuit of a common goal:
  • College and career readiness for all our students
feedback discussion
FEEDBACK/DISCUSSION
  • Connections
    • How are these expectations connected to the work your school has done in 2010-11?
    • How are these expectations connected to your plans for 2011-12?
  • Warm and cool feedback
    • What are you excited about?
    • What are you concerned about?
  • Challenges and support
    • What challenges do you foresee in implementation of the expectations?
    • What additional supports might you need?
if you have questions or additional feedback
IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS OR ADDITIONAL FEEDBACK
  • Contact CFI@schools.nyc.gov
  • For Common Core resources, visit the Common Core Library
  • http://schools.nyc.gov/Academics/CommonCoreLibrary
  • For Teacher Effectiveness resources, visit ARIS Learn
  • https://learn.arisnyc.org
slide18

WHICHEVER WAY YOU MEASURE IT, GRADUATION RATES HAVE GONE UP

  • BY NYC MEASUREMENTS, 33% SINCE 2002

Percent of Students in a Cohort Graduating from High School in 4 Years

1986-1992: + 9%

1992-2002: + 0%

2002-2009: + 33%

63 (includes August graduates)

Class of

NY State Calculation Method

(Including August Grads)

NYC Calculation Method

NY State Calculation Method

Notes: NYC traditional calculation includes Local and Regents Diplomas, GEDs, Special Education diplomas, and August graduates. It does not include disabled students in self-contained classrooms or District 75 students. The NYS calculation, used since 2005, includes Local and Regents Diplomas and all disabled students. It does not include GEDs and Special Education diplomas. Discharge rate does not include dropouts.

slide19
How the demand for skills has changedEconomy-wide measures of routine and non-routine task input (U.S.)

Mean task input as percentiles of the 1960 task distribution

(Levy and Murnane)

slide20

RIGOROUS AND ENGAGING STUDENT WORK

Sample Math Task*

Sample Literacy Task

  • Grade 8 example: The Aussie Fir Tree
  • Grades 9-10 students will:
    • Read and comprehend informational texts in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently AND
    • Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence, including the development of claims and counterclaims.
  • XXX

Draw and describe Stage 5 of the pattern in terms of its shape & number of unit squares needed to construct the fir tree.

How many unit squares are needed to build a Stage 10 Aussie Fir Tree? Show your work.

Given any stage number, n, determine a closed-form equation to determine the number of unit squares needed to build the tree.

* MARS University of Nottingham, 2011

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