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Web Services New Hype or Real Use? PowerPoint Presentation
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Web Services New Hype or Real Use?

Web Services New Hype or Real Use?

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Web Services New Hype or Real Use?

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  1. Web ServicesNew Hype or Real Use? Presented by Joseph J. Sarna Jr., MCSD JJS Systems, LLC

  2. Agenda • What are web services? • How Do We Create or Use Web Services? • Platform Comparisons • Web Services Security • Summary

  3. What are Web Services? • The next generation of applications designed for machine consumption • Applications that can be called remotely via HTTP requests • Language agnostic • Can be called from any platform or client type • Uses SOAP and XML as the transfer medium • Allows passing of data through firewalls

  4. Examples of Web Services • Stock price retrieval • Monetary Conversion • Credit Card Validations • Dictionary Service • Language Conversion • Purchase history retrieval • Current inventory Retrieval • Employee benefits updates

  5. Agenda • What are web services? • How Do We Create or Use Web Services? • Platform Comparisons • Web Services Security • Summary

  6. How Do We Create or Use Web Services? • What do we need as developers to: • Create a web service? • Consume a web service? • Especially if we need to communicate with different platforms and programming languages • Standards!

  7. World Wide Web Consortium Standards • W3C Standards - http://www.w3.org/ • W3C Web Services Group-http://www.w3.org/2002/ws/ • W3C SOAP Group - http://www.w3.org/2000/xp/Group/ • W3C XML Group - http://www.w3.org/XML/

  8. Requirements for Web Services Development • A standard way to represent data • A common, extensible, message format • A common, extensible, service description language • A way to discover services located on a particular Web site • A way to discover service providers

  9. Standard Representation of Data • XML 1.0 defines the universally supported transfer syntax • XML Schema defines XML's type system. • Plain text transferred in a relational format

  10. Common Message Format • SOAP – Simple Object Access Protocol • A protocol specification that defines a uniform way of passing XML-encoded data. (Wrapper around the XML Data) • Defines a way to perform remote procedure calls (RPCs) using HTTP as the underlying communication protocol. • Submitted in 2000 to the W3C as a Note by IBM, Microsoft, UserLand, and DevelopMentor

  11. Common Service Description Language • WSDL – Web Services Description Language • Provides a way for service providers to describe the basic format of web service requests over different protocols or encodings. • WSDL is a template for how web services should be described and bound to clients • Fed-Ex Tracking WSDL

  12. Method to Discover Services and Providers • UDDI – Universal Description, Discovery and Integration • Provides a mechanism for clients to dynamically find other web services. • A UDDI registry is established to allow: • Businesses to publish a service and its usage interfaces • Clients to obtain services and bind programmatically to them.

  13. Consuming Web Services

  14. Agenda • What are web services? • How Do We Create or Use Web Services? • Platform Comparisons • Web Services Security • Summary

  15. Platform Comparisons - Service Description • J2EE • Supports WSDL • Supports web services registries • .NET • Supports the WSDL 1.1 specification, however, an XML namespace is used within a WSDL document to uniquely identify the Web Service's endpoints. • Supports Web services registries

  16. Platform Comparisons - Service Implementation • J2EE • Existing Java classes and applications can be wrapped using the Java API for XML-based RPC (JAX-RPC) and exposed as Web Services. • With J2EE, business services written as Enterprise JavaBeans are wrapped and exposed as Web Services. • .NET • .NET applications are compiled to an intermediate binary code called the Microsoft Intermediate Language (MSIL). • This code is then compiled to native code using a Just In Time compiler (JIT) at run time and run in a virtual machine called the Common Language Runtime (CLR).

  17. Service Publishing, Discovery and Binding • J2EE • Java API for XML Registries (JAXR) is a single general purpose API for interoperating with multiple registry types. There are three types of JAXR providers: • The JAXR Pluggable Provider, which implements features of the JAXR specification that are independent of any specific registry type. • The JAXR Bridge Provider, which serves as a bridge to a class of registries such as ebXML or UDDI. • .NET • Discovery of Web Services with DISCO in the form of a discovery (DISCO) file, an XML document that contains links to other resources that describe the Web Service. • Supports UDDI • Provides a .NET UDDI server

  18. Service Invocation and Execution • J2EE • J2EE uses the Java API for XML-based RPC (JAX-RPC) to send SOAP method calls to remote parties and receive the results. • A Web Service client uses a JAX-RPC service by invoking remote methods on a service port described by a WSDL document. • .NET • Implementing a Web Service listener by: • Using the built in .NET SOAP message classes • Constructing a Web Service listener manually, using MSXML, ASP, or ISAPI, etc. • Using the Microsoft Soap Toolkit to build a Web Service listener that connects to a business application, implemented using COM.

  19. Agenda • What are web services? • How Do We Create or Use Web Services? • Platform Comparisons • Web Services Security • Summary

  20. Web Services Security • Three types of potential threats that need to be considered and addressed: • The SOAP message could be modified or read by hackers. • A hacker could send messages to a service that, while well-formed, lack appropriate security claims to carry on the processing. • Service theft • Addressed by the WS-Security Standards of W3C

  21. Message Security • The specification only indicates that security tokens may be bound to messages. • A claim can be either endorsed or unendorsed by a trusted authority with a signed security token that is digitally signed or encrypted by the authority. • An unendorsed claim, on the other hand, can be trusted if there is a trust relationship between the sender and the receiver. • One special type of unendorsed claim is Proof-of-Possession. For example, a username/password combination.

  22. Message Protection • WS-Security provides a means to protect messages by encrypting and/or digitally signing a body, a header, an attachment, or any combination of these items. • Message integrity is provided by using XML Signature in conjunction with security tokens to ensure that messages are transmitted without modifications. • Message confidentiality leverages XML Encryption in conjunction with security tokens to keep portions of a SOAP message confidential.

  23. Missing or Inappropriate Claims • The standards specify that a message receiver should reject a message with an invalid signature, or missing or inappropriate claims, as if it is an unauthorized (or malformed) message.

  24. Agenda • What are web services? • How Do We Create or Use Web Services? • Platform Comparisons • Web Services Security • Summary

  25. Summary • Hype? • Still a ways to go for mainstream use. • Security still needs work. • Real Use? • Informational services available now, some free, some fee. • Internal web services (Intranets) possible now. • Security via SSL or VPN available now.

  26. New Hampshire User Groups • Manchester Java User Group – Second Wednesday of the month – SNHU campus – http://www.manjug.org • NE C# User Group – Second Thursday of the month – SNHU campus – http://www.csharp.4square.us/ • NH .NET User Group – Third Thursday of the month – BU Training Center, Tyngsboro, MA - http://www.nhdnug.net/ • NH VB User Group – Fourth Wednesday of the month – SNHU campus – http://www.nhvbug.com