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Lemonade Stand A Variables Lesson Written by Vicente Huerta

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  1. Lemonade Stand A Variables Lesson Written by Vicente Huerta

  2. Objectives: TEK Math 6th Grade (6.5)  Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses letters to represent an unknown in an equation. The student is expected to formulate equations from problem situations described by linear relationships.

  3. Day 1

  4. Howdy! How much for a cup of that lemonade you have there? Oh.. I don’t know. How about a dollar? A dollar? No thanks.. I suppose I’m not that thirsty

  5. <Larry>: Cousin! How was business!? <Stan>: Not so hot. I spent more on supplies than what I made…

  6. <Larry>: Wait.. Did you use variables like I told you? <Stan>: Not so hot. I spent more on supplies than what I made…

  7. <Larry>: Wait.. Did you use variables like I told you? <Stan>: I forgot to. Can you run it by me again?

  8. <Larry>: Sure thing! <Stan>: I forgot to. Can you run it by me again?

  9. <Larry>: A variable is a quantity or function that may assume any given value or set of values. <Larry>: That’s not all! You can set up variables with constants in an equation to figure out your cost and minimum price in order to cover cost! <Larry>: This can be a letter such as X or Y, any letter for that matter.

  10. <Larry>: Note that supply price is constant and total cost is a variable (X). Why? Because normally we do not know the total cost until we purchase our supplies. You can assign variables to unknowns. However, we do not control the price of our supplies and therefore it is a constant. <Larry>: So you spent $20.00 on (A) sugar, (B) cups, (C) ice, and (D) lemons. A(Price)+B(Price)+C(Price)+(Price)D=Total Cost

  11. <Stan>: I bought 60 cups, 4 bags of sugar, 20 lemons, and 2 bags of ice. 60($0.10)+4($2.00)+20($0.10)+2($2.00) = Total Cost = X =$20.00 This is easier than I thought!

  12. <Stan>: I get it! So let me apply variables to cost and price. I need to cover my cost so I will assign the letter Y as my minimum price, my variable since its unknown. (Total Cost)/(Number of Lemonade Cups I can make)= (Price) or $20.00/60 =Price=Y = $0.33!!!! I will try $0.40. My profit eq. is (Price)-(Minimum Price)= (Profit) or Z 0.40-0.33= .07 = Z

  13. Day 2

  14. Argh! How much for a cup of that lemonade you have there? Only 40 cents please! Hmm.. Sounds fair young lad! Thank you!

  15. Written by Vicente Huerta TEK Math 6th Grade (6.5)  Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses letters to represent an unknown in an equation. The student is expected to formulate equations from problem situations described by linear relationships. ClipArt by www.millan.net Music by www.freeplaymusic.com