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Time-of-Flight and Position Resolution in Proposed Detectors
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  1. Time-of-Flight and Position Resolution in Proposed Detectors Dr. William Tireman Northern Michigan University Mr. Daniel Wilbern NMU Research Assistant

  2. Goals • Measure the dispersion in the time-of-flight of cosmic rays between two plastic scintillator detectors • Measure the position resolution for a cosmic ray hit on the test detector

  3. Neutron Research • Red – charged particle taggers • Green – Neutron Bars • Neutrons knock protons out and they scatter up and down into the detectors Picture from: Dr. Andrei Semenov, University of Regina, Canada

  4. Pictures from: Dr. Andrei Semenov, University of Regina, Canada

  5. General Detector Setup/Circuit

  6. Measurement Parameters • Vertical tracks selected by limiting energy deposited in small detector (1.0 cm width) via CFD lower level discriminator • Small detector was positioned over location on test detector with 5.0 cm axis in the vertical to give largest energy deposition in small detector • Coincidence requirement between mean-time signal in the test detector and the small detector was formed with LeCroy 465 unit • Two Ortec 566 TAC were then gated with the coincidence signal • Position spectrum was formed by starting the TAC with the ‘left’ PMT and stopping it with the ‘right’ PMT (converted to position via ) • Time-of-flight spectrum was formed by starting a second TAC with the mean-time signal from the small detector and stopping it with the mean-timed signal from the test detector • All TAC signals were then converted to histograms via Canberra multiport, multichannel analyzer and analyzed with MatLab code

  7. Typical Spectra

  8. Plan A – 120o Bend Configuration

  9. Plan B – 90o Configuration

  10. Conclusion • Assume detectors contribute to time dispersion in equally so time dispersion is divided by • The Plan B configuration (90o bend on 1-meter detector) has a better time dispersion and position resolution • Plan B will be easier to build and will be more robust • Plan B gives more segmentation • Plan A covers more acceptance • Plan A requires fewer electronics • Work Continues on using two detectors for defining vertical geometry

  11. References Madey, R. et al. (1983). Large volume neutron detectors with subnanosecond time dispersions. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, 214(2-3), 401-413 doi: 10.1016/0167-5087(83)90608-7

  12. Using Small Detector Energy to Limit Cosmic Ray Incident Angle

  13. Using Small Detector Energy to Limit Cosmic Ray Incident Angle

  14. Using Small Detector Energy to Limit Cosmic Ray Incident Angle

  15. Using Small Detector Energy to Limit Cosmic Ray Incident Angle