smart coatings materiel program l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
SMART COATINGS ™ MATERIEL PROGRAM PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
SMART COATINGS ™ MATERIEL PROGRAM

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 19

SMART COATINGS ™ MATERIEL PROGRAM - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 187 Views
  • Uploaded on

SMART COATINGS ™ MATERIEL PROGRAM. Nelson Colon US Army ARDEC Industrial Ecology Center Picatinny Arsenal, NJ ncolon@pica.army.mil. Presentation Outline. Objective Problem Statement Technology Driver Research Management Team Nanotechnology Background

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'SMART COATINGS ™ MATERIEL PROGRAM' - ostinmannual


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
smart coatings materiel program

SMART COATINGS ™MATERIEL PROGRAM

Nelson Colon

US Army ARDEC

Industrial Ecology Center

Picatinny Arsenal, NJ

ncolon@pica.army.mil

presentation outline
Presentation Outline
  • Objective
  • Problem Statement
  • Technology Driver
  • Research Management Team
  • Nanotechnology Background
  • Coating Characteristics / Example Research Tasks
  • Program Benefits
  • Summary
objective
Objective
  • To develop & demonstrate “leap-ahead” coatings technologies for Army weapon systems.
  • To provide Current, Interim Force and Objective Force with greater performance and survivability capabilities at lower total ownership costs
  • Establish effective cooperative agreements & partnering networks with academia, industry and OGAs for technology development of dual interest.
problem statement
Problem Statement
  • Coatings applied to weapon systems today are “dumb”
  • Estimated total cost for DOD corrosion related problems is $20 billion per year
    • $4 billion of which is related to painting/ depainting
    • $1.2 billion of which is related to helicoptor maintenance Center for Army Analysis (CAA) Study
  • Current coatings are unable to self-heal or alert user of anomalies thereby decreasing materiel survivability
  • Current coating application and removal is labor intensive and hazardous to people working with them
slide6

Corrosion Costs

CH-47D

B Co 24th AVN

1998

CH-47D BIWEEKLY

*CH-47D COST

$18.2 MILLION

PartsM/H

Floor Corrosion (5 Aircraft) $14,883 3500

Component Corrosion $1,047,951600

1998 Cost $1,078,451 4100

technology driver
Technology Driver
  • In October 1999, Army leadership unveiled The ArmyVision (2010):- to transform the Army into a strategically responsive force that is dominant across the full spectrum of operations
  • Impact- A series of new and modernized weapons systems that will be fielded globally with challenges in materials and corrosion technologies
research management team
Research Management Team
  • Industrial Ecology Center, U.S. Army TACOM-ARDEC
  • New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), NJ
  • Clemson University, SC / Wake Forest University, NC
  • U.S. Army Research Lab (Adelphi & APG)
slide9

Nanotechnology Background

The ability to work at the molecular level, atom by atom, to create large structures with fundamentally new molecular organization

Nanostructured materials yield extraordinary differences in rates and control of chemical reactions, electrical conductivity, magnetic properties, thermal conductivity, strength, and fire safety

smart coatings characteristics
Smart Coatings™ Characteristics

Possible Coating Structure:

Smart Coatings ™ Functions:

  • Preserve items from corrosion
  • Incorporate nanomachines
  • Self-heal
  • Permit easy removal when giventhe proper “orders”
  • Protect items from harsh environmentsendured because of mission requirements
  • Alert sustainment community of potential coating/substrate problems

Substrate

Nanocrystalline cladding

Sensing

TBD

Non-chromate inhibitor

slide13

Self-healing Coating example:

University of Illinois researcher Scott White’s team has developed a synthetic composite material that can automatically heal itself when ruptured or cracked. The graphic image manipulated from a scanning electron microscope (left) shows a ruptured capsule (red) on a fracture plane (light blue) with the catalyst (multicolored). The chemical structure coming out of the capsule is the polymerized healing agent.

In the optical microscope images (left), a crack passes through a microcapsule, which releases the healing agent into the crack

smart coatings task iv
Smart Coatings ™Task IV

Title:R&D of Smart Coatings™ Materiel through Noble Metal Nanoparticles

PrincipalInvestigator:Clemson University, SC

Objective:To develop coatings that inhibit corrosion, sense failure and self heal with minimal environmental impact

Status:

  • Developed nano-engineered, organicmetals incorporating carbon nanotubes
  • Nanotubes shown to act as charge sourceto enhance electrical characteristics
  • Able to monitor stresses within film viachanges in absorption characteristics
slide15

Absorption (arbitrary units)

Wavelength (nm)

Work Performed / Past Success

  • Clemson Univ. (CU) has shown that dispersing nanometals within the electrochromic host can result in a change of the overall reflectivity characteristics
  • By controlling the particle shape (length, aspect ratio, etc) one can control its optical response to incident light.
  • Figure to right shows Color Changes with Nanorods of Silver as the Length to Diameter Ratio is Changed from 1(ball) to 6 (rod).

CU has achieved excellent control over the particle morphology and can now create any light scatter they would like. This translates into COLORS!

smart coatings task ii
Smart Coatings ™Task II

Title: R&D on Large Area Flexible Circuits

Principal Investigator: New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ

Objective(s):

  • To develop large area array of sensors on flexible substrates to detect temp, stress, damage, sound, and light as required by needs of the Army.
  • Information to be transferred to a monitoring site with alarms for preprogrammed dangerous conditions.

Status:

  • Fabricated and characterized prototype pressure and temperature sensors on flexible substrates
program benefits
Program Benefits
  • Decrease life-cycle costs
  • Reduce maintenance and liability costs
  • Increase Army readiness by reducing equipment downtime
  • Reduce potential hazards associated with depainting operations
  • Correspond with Army’s Transformation Strategy to help safeguard our national and international interests
summary
Summary
  • Current coatings on weapon systems are not “smart”
  • Army Transformation will result in new and modernized weapons systems requiring protection
  • Smart Coatings ™ materiel for future weapon systems will increase survivability & readiness while decreasing life-cycle costs, maintenance & potential hazards
slide19

CONTACT INFORMATION

Nelson Colon

US Army Industrial Ecology Center

Picatinny Arsenal, NJ

973-724-2482

ncolon@pica.army.mil

Laura Battista

US Army Industrial Ecology Center

Picatinny Arsenal, NJ

973-724-5650

battista@pica.army.mil