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  1. Introduction to Library Research Doug Way wayd@gvsu.edu 331-2863

  2. Today we will talk about… • Introduction to GVSU Libraries • Research Strategies & Common Problems • Reference Publications • Categories of Journals • Introduction to Searching the Online Catalog • Introduction to Database Searching • Which databases should you use? • What are some general features of most databases? • How do you know if GVSU owns what you need? • What do you do when GVSU doesn’t?

  3. Introduction to GVSU Libraries • Seven different libraries at GVSU • One MAIN library and six branches

  4. Introduction to GVSU Libraries • Allendale Libraries • Zumberge • The University’s MAIN Library • KCRC (K-12 Curriculum Resource Center) • Located in Au Sable Hall • Seidman House • Archives, Rare and Special Collections

  5. Introduction to GVSU Libraries • Grand Rapids Libraries • Steelcase • Located in the DeVos Center on the Pew Campus (near the clock tower) • Contains business, law, criminal justice, social work and engineering books • Frey Foundation Learning Center • Located in the Center for Health Sciences • Recent health science periodicals and health science reference books

  6. Introduction to GVSU Libraries • Other GVSU Libraries • Holland Campus • Van Andel Research Center

  7. Introduction to GVSU Libraries • Librarian’s Role • Acquire resources for students and faculty • Assist Students and Faculty in finding and using these resources • Our job is to help!

  8. Research Strategies • Common Research Problems • Confusion on where to begin • Library/Research Anxiety • Unrealistic expectations • Research is not easy • Close, but no cigar • I can’t find an article on my exact topic… • Research Question v. Thesis • Ill-defined Topic • Topic too vague • Topic too specific

  9. Reference Books • Provide basic information on a topic • Background information • Often a source of statistical information • Provide references to other sources • Helpful in narrowing down topics

  10. Reference Books Look at your group’s reference book. Be prepared to share with the class: • A description of the book • How would you use it? How do you find the information inside the book? • What kind of information does it provide? • How long are the articles? • Does it provide you with a bibliography? • When you would want to use it? • Would it be helpful in narrowing down a topic?

  11. Narrowing Down Topics • Other sources for narrowing down your topics • CQ Researcher • Websites • NY Times College (www.nytimes.com/college) • ACLU (www.aclu.org) • More on handout

  12. Research Strategies • Turning research question into search terms • Keys to Success • Well-defined research question or topic • Identifying Keywords • Alternative Terms

  13. Research Strategies • Developing Search Terms (identifying keywords and alternatives) • Research Question/Topic: Information on anorexia among female college students

  14. Research Strategies • Developing Search Terms • Connecting Terms • Boolean Operators • And (narrows search) • Not (narrows search) • Or (broadens search)

  15. Evaluating Journals • Three categories of journals • Popular (Time, Rolling Stone, Sports Illustrated) • Trade (Library Journal, Automotive News) • Scholarly (Journal of the American Medical Association, Nature)

  16. Evaluating Journals • Each category of journals has its own characteristics

  17. Evaluating Journals • Look at the article that you have been given. Based on the criteria on the chart, decide whether the article is from a scholarly, trade or popular journal. • An article will not necessarily meet all of the criteria for any one type of journal.

  18. Evaluating Journals • Peer Reviewed or Refereed Journals • Editorial Process • Articles are submitted for review • Articles are reviewed in a “blind” review process by experts in that field • Reviewers decide whether articles meet criteria for publication • Considered a more rigorous and less-biased review process

  19. Evaluating Journals • Scholarly v. Peer Reviewed • Two terms are often used interchangeably, but are not the same • The designation “scholarly” is subjective • Can be debated • Peer Review is an editorial process • Not open for debate • Is either peer reviewed or not

  20. Evaluating Journals (and more) • When using other resources—books, websites, etc.—you will also need to evaluate. • Criteria may differ somewhat, but basics still stand • Who’s the author? • What are they using to back up their argument

  21. Finding Journal Articles • Where do you find Journal Articles? • Online Catalog?

  22. Finding Journal Articles • What do you find in the Online Catalog? • Items we own • Books • Music • Videos • Journals • Issues we own, what format they are in (online, in paper, on microfilm or microfiche), where they are located

  23. Finding Journal Articles • You use a database to find what articles are in a given journal title. • Databases index journal articles

  24. Finding Journal Articles • Types of Databases • Multi-Disciplinary • ProQuest Databases (all) • Expanded Academic • Wilson Select Plus • News Oriented • LexisNexis Academic • InfoTrac Onefile • Electric Library

  25. Finding Journal Articles • Types of Databases • Subject Specific • History (Historical Abstracts; America History and Life) • Psychology (PsycArticles; PsycInfo) • Health Science (Medline; Health Reference Center-Academic; Health and Wellness Resource Center) • If you don’t know which database to use, ask!